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In this installment of NPR's series Inside Alzheimer's, we hear from Greg O'Brien about his decision to sell the home where he and his wife raised their three children. O'Brien, a longtime journalist in Cape Cod, Mass., was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease in 2009.

Greg and Mary Catherine O'Brien have lived in their house on Cape Cod for more than 30 years. It's their dream house. They used to imagine growing old there.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump took an ongoing feud with Sen. John McCain to a new level today, mocking the former GOP nominee for having been a prisoner of war and calling him a "loser" for failing to win the White House in 2008.

"He was a war hero because he was captured," Trump said at the 2015 Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa.

"I like people who weren't captured," the current Republican front-runner told political consultant Frank Luntz, who hosted the event.

"He lost and let us down," Trump said. "I've never liked him as much after that."

Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, signaled his all-important approval of a historic nuclear deal forged with the West, but he portrayed the agreement as having been on Tehran's terms.

"Our policy toward the arrogant U.S. government won't change at all," Khamenei said in televised a speech in Tehran marking Eid, the end of Ramadan.

Former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis, who was forced out of his job as part of a new bailout deal to keep Athens in the euro zone, tells the BBC that the austerity measures that come with the agreement are "going to fail."

The financial reforms, imposed in exchange for an 86 billion euro ($93.6 billion) lifeline will "go down in history as the greatest disaster of macroeconomic management ever," Varoufakis tells the BBC.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

The U.S. Navy has confirmed that a fifth service member has died of wounds sustained in this week's shooting rampage at two military sites in Chattanooga.

According to a statement released by the Navy Office of Information:

"A male Navy Petty Officer succumbed to wounds received in the July 16 shooting at the Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) in Chattanooga, Tennessee July 18 at 2:17 a.m.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

In the deadliest single attack in a decade in Iraq, a truck bomb exploded at a crowded marketplace in eastern Diyala province, killing at least 115 people celebrating the end of the Muslim Holy month of Ramadan. The self-declared Islamic State reportedly has claimed responsibility.

All summer, Weekend Edition has been traveling the country in search of local flavor. The Midwest marks the latest stop on that trip of taste, down in Springfield, Mo. But the spot we found sports a distinctly tropical vibe.

It's called Pineapple Whip — both the beloved frozen dessert, and the series of roadside stands that sling them to long lines of eager eaters. And the treat is simple, too: a nondairy, juice-based soft serve. Something so simple, and so distinctive, it's tough to label it with any readily recognizable category, any name but its own.

The U.S. and Europe are in the midst of negotiating a historic trade deal that will create the world's largest consumer market: some 800 million people. Despite promises that the agreement will create thousands of new jobs, there's fierce resistance to it in Europe, especially when it comes to food.

Many Europeans say they want to preserve a way of life and eating that they say America's industrial farming and multinational corporations threaten. A smaller version of that battle is being fought in one Paris neighborhood known as "the belly of Paris."

Just hours after 24-year-old Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez opened fire on two military facilities in Chattanooga, Tenn., and killed four Marines, U.S. Attorney Bill Killian said authorities were treating the case as an "act of domestic terrorism."

Minutes later, authorities softened those words, saying all angles were being pursued — that they had not yet established a motive in the case.

What happens when you drop a regulation Spalding basketball from a 415-foot-high dam? It depends.

For a group from the trick basketball team How Ridiculous who sank a basket from atop the Gordon Dam in Tasmania, it meant landing a spot in the Guinness World Records book.

To be a lead in a Hollywood romance — especially a female lead — is to be told what's wrong with you. A lot. There's always an assistant or a best friend or, of course, the guy himself to fix you or coach you, because you are broken.

The fact that Amy Schumer's character in Trainwreck — also named Amy — is the reason it's called Trainwreck would make you think she's in for similar treatment. But that's not as much the case as it might seem.

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

Chattanooga, Tenn., shooter Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez was dismissed from his job at an Ohio nuclear plant because he didn't pass a background check, a person familiar with his employment history at at the company that operates the plant tells NPR.

Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET

Their experience levels ranged from multiple deployments in war zones to one year in the service with no deployments. Their homes ranged from Georgia to Wisconsin, but their lives converged in Thursday's deadly attack in Tennessee.

The Marine Corps has formally identified the victims as Gunnery Sgt. Thomas J. Sullivan, Staff Sgt. David A. Wyatt, Sgt. Carson A. Holmquist, and Lance Cpl. Squire K. Wells.

UCLA Health says it was a victim of a criminal cyberattack that affected as many as 4.5 million people.

UCLA Health, in a statement Friday, said attackers accessed parts of the computer network that contain personal and medical information, but there is no evidence they "actually accessed or acquired any individual's personal or medical information." The statement said UCLA Health is working with the FBI and has hired private computer forensic experts to help in the investigation.

It's a bird! It's a plane! It's ... actually, just birds. More specifically, seagulls that have gone on the attack in Cornwall, England, causing a public outcry that has gone all the way up to 10 Downing Street.

For centuries, cooks around the world have been tapping a powerful secret ingredient. It can bind casseroles, tenderize meats, meld with vegetables and spices as a cooling dip or blend with fruits for a tangy drink.

We're talking, of course, about yogurt.

Pluto looks to be a far cry from the dead body that many scientists had long presumed. As the New Horizons probe continues to report back from the fringes of the solar system, a word that Mr. Spock might have used sums up the reaction: fascinating.

On July 22, 2011, Anders Breivik set off a bomb in the center of the Norwegian capital, Oslo, killing eight people, then traveled to a nearby island where the then-ruling Labour Party was holding a summer camp and shot dead 69 people. Today, Breivik, who is serving a 21-year prison term for his actions, gained admission into Oslo University to study political science.

Breivik, who holds far-right views, has never expressed remorse for his actions, which he said were spurred by a Marxist-Islamic takeover of Europe.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you four reads.

From Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, an NPR international correspondent who covers South America:

Its cost had swollen to more than $2 billion; its design sparked an unflattering meme. And now Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has ordered organizers of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics to start over with their plan to build a centerpiece stadium.

"I have decided to bring the current (building) plan for the new National Stadium back to the drawing board and review the plan from scratch," Abe said, according to Kyodo News.

A year after a Malaysian airliner was shot down over eastern Ukraine by what is widely believed to have been a rebel-operated, Russian made surface-to-air missile, ceremonies were held to remember the 298 people killed in the disaster.

Meanwhile, the Kremlin has rebuffed calls for a United Nations tribunal to prosecute the suspects behind the July 17, 2014, downing of the Boeing 777 en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur.

This week's show brings back into the studio — well, remotely anyway — our original producer and music director Mike Katzif, now ensconced in New York working for the lovely people at NPR's Ask Me Another. Mike joins us for a talk about the Netflix comedy BoJack Horseman, which just made its second season available this week. It's an adult-oriented cartoon with a sometimes startling undercurrent of sadness, and you might want to give it a shot.

Our Robot Servants

Jul 17, 2015

Industrial robots are big machines capable of merciless speed and power. In a recent report in Time, a robot "grabbed and pushed" a man against a metal plate at a Volkswagen production plant, crushing him.

In Court, Your Face Could Determine Your Fate

Jul 17, 2015

Your face has a profound effect on the people around you. Its expression can prompt assumptions about how kind, mean or trustworthy you are. And for some people, a study finds, it could help determine their fate in court.

The German parliament has approved the latest bailout for Greece, voting overwhelmingly for the 86 billion euro ($93.65 billion) package aimed at keeping Athens in the eurozone.

Ahead of the vote in the Bundestag, German Chancellor Angela Merkel warned lawmakers of "predictable chaos" if they failed to OK the deal. The final vote was 439 in favor, 119 opposed and 40 abstentions.

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

Back in the 1940s, turning Americans onto the tangy taste of yogurt wasn't an easy sell.

It seems many of our grandparents turned their noses up at the idea of sour, fermented milk.

"The tart taste was totally unfamiliar to Americans, and that was really the biggest hurdle," says Michael Neuwirth, a spokesman for the Dannon Co.

Some of Kenya's most famous marathon runners tied on their shoes Wednesday — this time, to walk.

The group, including former world record holders Wilson Kipsang and Tegla Loroupe, began a "walk for peace" on Wednesday to raise awareness of armed ethnic violence in Northern Kenya, according to The Guardian. The walk was organized by John Kelai, an international marathon champion. Ethiopian marathoner Haile Gebrselassie is expected to join the final portion of the walk.

A jury in Colorado has found Aurora theater shooter James Holmes guilty of first-degree murder in the 2012 mass shooting that killed 12 people and injured 70 others. Holmes could now face the death penalty.

The jury of nine women and three men, who heard nearly three months of testimony in the case, deliberated for a day and a half before arriving at a decision on Thursday.

The verdict comes nearly three years to the day after the mass shooting on July 20, 2012, at the Century Aurora 16 theater.

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