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Summarizing its investigation of Edward Snowden, the House Intelligence Committee says the former National Security Agency contractor did tremendous damage to the U.S.

The Committee published the summary findings of a two-year investigation today as a new film about Snowden opens across the country.

Snowden stole 1.5 million classified government documents that he had access to as an NSA contractor. He then fled to Russia via Hong Kong.

As NPR's David Welna reports,

News that late librarian Robert Morin left the University of New Hampshire $4 million has been hailed as a symbol of Morin's dedication and generosity. But the school's decision to spend $1 million of that money on a new video scoreboard for the football stadium is being criticized.

Days after the Florida mosque that had been attended by the Orlando Pulse nightclub gunman was set on fire, the sheriff's department of St. Lucie County says it has arrested Joseph Michael Schreiber, 32. Officers cited tips from the public and Schreiber owning a motorcycle like one seen on surveillance video.

"An examination of Schreiber's social media account also shows multiple anti-Islamic posts and comments," Major David Thompson of the sheriff's office says.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a formal recall of 1 million Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones on Thursday.

During a press conference, Chairman Elliot Kaye said consumers should "take advantage of this recall right away" because the phone represents such a "serious fire hazard."

Kaye said consumers should check the identifying number on the back of the phone at Samsung.com to determine whether their phone has a defective battery.

Jack Daniel's is a historic brand built on stories and legend. To this day, all of the whiskey is made in the hills of little Lynchburg, Tenn. And as part of its 150th anniversary, the company is highlighting a lesser-known part of its story: how a former slave played a key role in its founding.

Museum-goers, prepare yourselves for "unprecedented intimacy with a work of art."

Starting Friday, visitors to the Guggenheim are encouraged to relieve themselves in a fully functional toilet cast in 18-karat gold called America, which will be on display indefinitely. The installation by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan replaced the toilet in a small, single-unit museum restroom with a far flashier model.

An admitted former assassin has accused Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte of personally ordering extrajudicial killings — and, in one case, pulling the trigger.

Government officials have forcefully rejected the allegations, with Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre calling the man's testimony "lies, fabrications and a product of a fertile and a coached imagination," Reuters reports.

You're at a cafeteria, you've got your lunch ... and then you just don't know where to sit. You don't want to sit alone, but you also don't know who would be friendly and let you sit with them. Sixteen-year-old Natalie Hampton has been there. She's an 11th grader from Sherman Oaks, Calif., and the creator of a new app called Sit With Us.

Hampton spoke about the app with All Things Considered Host Audie Cornish. A transcript of their conversation follows, edited for clarity.

An undercover FBI agent who impersonated a journalist to find out who was making bomb threats to a high school near Seattle did not violate federal policy at the time, a Justice Department watchdog says. Since the 2007 incident, the policy has been stiffened but could still allow such a ploy.

In England's Northumberland area, at the Alnwick Castle, you can tour a locked patch of ground where killers reside.

This is the section of Alnwick Gardens dedicated to poisonous or narcotic plants. Once you find a garden keeper to let you through the locked gates, plants — some so toxic they are caged — come into view. They range from strychnine to poppies and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

Cat-scratch disease, as the name suggests, is spread by cats. It has long been considered a mild illness, but a study finds that people are getting more serious complications, which can be fatal.

And kissing kittens increases the risk of being infected.

Tim Page is no longer afraid of death. That's the one positive takeaway for him after surviving a traumatic brain injury.

Last year, the University of Southern California music and journalism professor — who was also a child prodigy filmmaker, Pulitzer-winning critic, person with Asperger's and father of three — collapsed at a train station. He woke up in an ambulance speeding to the hospital. He's still recovering, still fumbling a bit with the jigsaw pieces of a life a now a little more puzzling, a little more amazing.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The family of Sandra Bland, who was found dead in a Texas jail cell in July 2015, has reached a $1.9 million settlement in a wrongful-death lawsuit, according to one of the family's lawyers.

Waller County will pay $1.8 million and the Texas Department of Public Safety will pay $100,000, attorney Tom Rhodes tells The Two-Way. He says the settlement also includes changes to procedures at the Waller County jail and de-escalation training for state troopers.

Mornings on NPR will sound a little different, thanks to a cascade of host changes triggered by Renee Montagne's departure as Morning Edition co-host.

Rachel Martin, currently host of Weekend Edition Sunday, will be joining David Greene and Steve Inskeep as co-host on weekday mornings.

Lulu Garcia-Navarro, NPR's South America correspondent, will be picking up the mantle at Weekend Edition Sunday.

Police in Columbus, Ohio, say that officers who responded to a reported armed robbery Wednesday night located and pursued young suspects — and when one pulled what looked like a gun, an officer shot him multiple times, killing him. That suspect, Tyree King, 13, had a BB gun with a laser site, police say.

"This is very realistic," Sgt. Rich Weiner said of the BB gun, according to member station WOSU.

And so the opening salvo of the National Book Awards has been launched ... gradually.

Over the past four days, the National Book Foundation has been rolling out the lists of nominees for its prestigious literary prize in waves — beginning the week by revealing the nominees for its young people's literature, nonfiction and poetry prizes. On Thursday, the foundation capped the multiday rollout with the release of its longlist of 10 nominees for the fiction prize.

After a Marine Corps report found a pattern of abuse at the Parris Island training facility in South Carolina, 20 officers and enlisted leaders could face punishment, including potential criminal charges or court-martial.

The investigative report linked the hazing activities at Parris Island to the March 18 death of one young recruit, Raheel Siddiqui. Military officials say Siddiqui killed himself, but this week Siddiqui's family released a statement through their lawyer challenging that idea.

When Lanarion Norwood Jr. was 9 years old, he opened his family's refrigerator to find it almost empty. His grandmother, unemployed because of disability, had run out of food for the month. So Norwood did what many young children adamantly resist: He went to bed early. Sleeping, he reasoned, would help him suppress hunger, and he knew the next day he could eat at his Atlanta school.

During the Our Ocean conference in Washington, D.C., President Obama announced the creation of the first national marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean.

Yes, It Is Possible To Get Your Flu Shot Too Soon

20 hours ago

The pitches from pharmacy chains started in August: Come in and get your flu shot.

Convenience is touted. So are incentives. CVS offers a 20-percent-off shopping pass for everyone who gets a shot, while Walgreens donates toward international vaccination efforts.

The start of flu season is still weeks, if not months, away. Yet marketing of the vaccine has become an almost year-round effort that starts when the shots become available in August and is hyped as long as the supply lasts — often into April or May.

Saying it wants to make football safer for current and future athletes, the NFL is pledging to spend $100 million for "independent medical research and engineering advancements." A main goal will be to prevent and treat head injuries.

Announcing the pledge Wednesday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said it is in addition to the $100 million the league already committed toward medical research of brain injuries and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the progressive degenerative disease that has been found in football players.

There's no question that running changes your heart.

The issue is whether these changes are good or bad. I don't mean the occasional 3 miles once or twice a week, although even this minimal amount of exercise seems to have positive health benefits.

Sugar shocked.

That describes the reaction of many Americans this week following revelations that, 50 years ago, the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists for research that shifted the focus away from sugar's role in heart disease — and put the spotlight squarely on dietary fat.

What might surprise consumers is just how many present-day nutrition studies are still funded by the food industry.

This week, the U.K. introduced a 5-pound note that's designed to be waterproof, tear-resistant and chewable.

The new polymer bills, which were first released on Tuesday and will gradually be entering circulation over the next few weeks, feature Winston Churchill on the back, with a quotation: "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat."

My mother swears I learned to read by watching The Electric Company on TV, so maybe that's why I was initially a bit lax when it came to my daughter and screen time.

But after realizing she would be perfectly content to spend every free minute switching between the PBS Kids app and toy unboxing videos on YouTube, my husband and I drew several lines in the sand and drastically limited her screen use by both time and content.

In a move that mirrors the NCAA's decision to pull championship events from North Carolina, the Atlantic Coast Conference says it is relocating all upcoming major championships, citing the state's HB2 law that limits civil rights protections for LGBT people.

With the move, the Greensboro, N.C.-based ACC is taking its marquee events out of the state in which it was founded back in the 1950s.

President Obama has announced that the U.S. is ready to lift economic sanctions against Myanmar in light of political reforms in the Southeast Asian nation.

It's going to happen "soon," Obama said, but he did not indicate a specific timeline during a joint news conference Wednesday at the White House with Myanmar's de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

Lifting sanctions "is the right thing to do in order to ensure that the people of Burma see the rewards from a new way of doing business, and a new government," Obama said. (The country is also known as Burma.)

A powerful typhoon in North Korea has caused devastating floods, killing more than 130 people and displacing at least 100,000, according to United Nations agencies.

Typhoon Lionrock struck North Korea about two weeks ago. It triggered floods that have left at least 138 people dead and some 400 others missing, the U.N. resident coordinator's office says.

The 10th named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season was an odd one: When the National Weather Service announced the formation of Tropical Storm Julia in northeastern Florida on Tuesday night, it marked one of the few known instances of such a storm developing over land rather than open water.

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