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Pennsylvania Attorney General Convicted In Grand Jury Leak

6 minutes ago

Pennsylvania's top prosecutor has herself been found guilty of perjury, criminal conspiracy and other charges in a leak of grand jury material.

A jury found that Attorney General Kathleen Kane leaked confidential investigative material to a Philadelphia newspaper to get revenge on a political enemy and lied about it under oath, reports Katie Colaneri of member station WHYY.

Colaneri adds, "Once seen as a Democratic rising star, Pennsylvania law requires Kane to step down from the attorney general's office when she is sentenced within the next three months."

A New York City man was charged Monday in Saturday's shooting deaths of an imam and his associate as they left a mosque in Queens. Police say the suspect, Oscar Morel, 35, of Brooklyn, is charged with two counts of second-degree murder and criminal possession of a weapon.

Police Deputy Inspector Henry Sautner describes how the crime occurred:

Vanderbilt University will pay more than a million dollars, returning a donation made 83 years ago, so that it can remove an inscription with the word "Confederate" from a campus dorm.

The building in the heart of the freshman commons is officially called Confederate Memorial Hall, but since 2002 it's been referred to as simply Memorial Hall. It opened in 1935 thanks to a $50,000 gift from the United Daughters of the Confederacy two years earlier.

The children of Martin Luther King Jr. have agreed to end a legal battle over his Nobel Peace Prize and travel Bible, which pitted the civil rights leader's heirs against each other.

A judge in Georgia signed an order Monday releasing the items to Martin Luther King III who serves with his siblings, Dexter Scott King and Bernice King, as the sole directors of their father's estate.

Comedian Bill Cosby's attempt to have his deposition testimony about alleged sexual assaults resealed was rejected by a federal appeals court, which decided that the issue is moot because the details have already been published.

The 3rd U.S. Court of Appeals in Philadelphia ruled:

It came as a surprise this June when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended against using the nasal flu vaccine for the 2016-2017 flu season, citing a lack of evidence that it works.

Comedy Central is canceling The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore after Thursday's episode.

The announcement came as a surprise Monday with the network cutting loose the politically conscious show a few months before the presidential election.

In a statement, Comedy Central credited Wilmore and his staff with generating conversations "by addressing social issues of great importance to the country, always challenging people's attitudes, perceptions and bias."

Do people think about food more in times of scarcity than in times of plenty? Married culinary historians Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe think so. Ziegelman and Coe are the authors of A Square Meal, which examines the impact of the country's decade-long Great Depression on American diets.

Ziegelman tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that the Depression was one of the "most important food moments" in U.S. history. Coe agrees: "The Great Depression was a time when Americans had food front and foremost in their minds and were worrying about it every day."

Dozens of journal articles cross our desks at NPR each week and, like nurses in the emergency room, we need to do rapid triage.

First we scan for those in critical need of attention (they aren't all that frequent). Next we look for studies that are interesting but not essential. Finally, we ask ourselves whether articles that are iffy need some attention anyway, since other news organizations are going to run with them. We figure Shots readers would like to see our take.

Devastating floods in southern Louisiana have killed at least five people and pushed tens of thousands from their homes.

As the Two-Way reported Sunday, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency over the weekend, describing the flooding as "unprecedented and historic."

Three student leaders avoided jail time for their part in weeks-long demonstrations that brought Hong Kong to a standstill nearly two years ago.

Joshua Wong and Nathan Law were sentenced on Monday to community service for their part in the Umbrella Movement demonstrations. A third activist, Alex Chow, received a suspended prison sentence so he could embark on graduate studies, The Associated Press reports.

Now, you can love your seafood and eat it, too. But first, you'll have to catch it. Fisherman Kirk Lombard's new book, The Sea Forager's Guide to the Northern California Coast, teaches the art, science, ethics and wisdom of fishing for your next meal in the ocean. Through wit, poetry and anecdotes, Lombard makes the case that the sincerest stewards of wild sea creatures are often those who intend to have them for dinner.

A South African woman has been sentenced to 10 years in jail for kidnapping a 3-day-old baby and raising her as her own child.

The 52-year-old Cape Town woman remains anonymous, Peter Granitz reports for NPR, and continues to deny that she committed any crime.

Zephany Nurse was kidnapped from her mother's hospital room in 1997. She was given a new name by her kidnapper, which – like her abductor's name — has not been made public, to protect Zephany's privacy. She was raised as the kidnapper's own daughter.

Milwaukee saw a second night of unrest on Sunday following a fatal police shooting this weekend. Sunday's protests were smaller and less destructive than the previous night's, although some violence continued and one person was shot and wounded under unknown circumstances.

The weekend's demonstrations and rioting were prompted by the police killing of a 23-year-old black man, identified by police as Sylville Smith, on Saturday. Smith ran from police during a traffic stop. Police say he was carrying a gun.

You've heard of the San Francisco gold rush. But that rush spurred another, lesser-known event: the egg rush. The legions of miners who swept into the region in the 1850s hoping to strike gold all had to be fed. And they needed protein to stay strong. But when food shortages hit, wily entrepreneurs looked for eggs in an unlikely source: the Farallon Islands.

The battle continues to rage between drug companies that are trying to make as much money as possible and insurers trying to drive down drug prices. And consumers are squarely in the middle.

That's because, increasingly, prescription insurers are threatening to kick drugs off their lists of approved medications if the manufacturers won't give them big discounts.

Last November, a provocative result made the rounds on social media and assorted blogs: A paper with data from over 1,000 participants across six countries reported that children from Christian and Muslim households behaved less altruistically than their peers from non-religious homes.

But a new analysis of the same data set calls this conclusion into question.

Boko Haram, the Nigeria-based militant group, has purportedly released a new video claiming that some of the Chibok schoolgirls were killed during Nigerian military airstrikes.

The extremist group abducted the girls in April 2014, and most are still missing. The case spurred an international outcry and prompted the "Bring Back Our Girls" campaign.

New York police are working to track down the gunman who fatally shot the leader of a mosque in Queens and his associate on Saturday as they were walking home from afternoon prayers.

Meanwhile, members of the Bangladeshi Muslim community are mourning the death of Imam Maulama Akonjee, 55, and his friend Thara Uddin, 64. They're calling on the police to investigate the killings as a hate crime.

The federal state of emergency in Flint, Mich. expires today, as the city continues to navigate a public health crisis caused by lead-laced water.

Officials are trying to reassure Flint residents that they will still have access to free bottled water, filters and cartridges, as Michigan Radio reported.

Rescue efforts are underway in Southeast Louisiana as the state is drenched and battered by what the governor has called an "unprecedented and historic flooding event." He has declared a state of emergency and three people have been killed by the floods.

How The Placebo Effect Could Boost An Olympic Performance

Aug 14, 2016

Olympic medals are won by margins of tenths or even hundredths of a second. So, it's no surprise that athletes want any edge they can get — even methods not backed by a lot of scientific evidence.

Riots Follow Fatal Police Shooting In Milwaukee

Aug 14, 2016

Riots erupted in Milwaukee's north side late Saturday night, in the same neighborhood a police officer fatally shot a 23-year-old man earlier in the day.

Milwaukee police said in a statement that at approximately 3:30 p.m., two uniformed officers stopped two male occupants in a car, who proceeded to flee the scene on foot.

Khaled Omar Harrah, a volunteer rescuer who spent nearly three years rushing to the scenes of airstrikes and barrel bombs to save lives, has been killed in the embattled city of Aleppo.

Rarely has an actor not seen or heard made such a big impact.

Kenny Baker, the actor who played R2-D2 in six of the Star Wars films, died Saturday, his agent confirms to NPR.

Standing at 3 feet 8 inches tall, the British actor also appeared in The Elephant Man, Time Bandits and Flash Gordon, among other films.

"He was just a lovely guy," said agent Johnny Mans, "and I shall miss him terribly."

Newborn conjoined twins have been evacuated out of one of Syria's most embattled areas for urgent medical treatment, following an international appeal to save their lives.

Baby boys Moaz and Nawras were born in the besieged rebel stronghold of Eastern Ghouta in July 23. As the BBC reported, the twins "are joined at the chest with protruding intestines."

Virginia State Police say at least six people were killed when a private airplane caught fire as it was attempting to land at an airport in Fredericksburg, Va. on Friday afternoon.

The police have identified the victims, who are from Indiana, Kentucky and Germany.

"A 1969 Beech 95-B55 twin-engine, fixed-wing aircraft was attempting to land at the Shannon Airport," state police spokesperson Corinne Geller said in an email to NPR.

A federal judge in Wisconsin has overturned the conviction of Brendan Dassey, who was found guilty of helping his uncle kill a young woman in 2005. The story rose to national prominence when it was chronicled on the Netflix documentary series "Making a Murderer."

Now, U.S. Magistrate Judge William E. Duffin has ordered that Dassey should be released from custody within 90 days, unless prosecutors file an appeal against him.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Newsdesk Editor Barbara Campbell:

This essay by Sarah Gailey is a hoot. It also feels true, delving into cartoon characters to ask why the women have to be villains to be bold, to seek power, to act now.

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