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The Two-Way
7:23 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Jordan Spieth, 21, Cruises To Masters Victory, 18 Under Par

Jordan Spieth celebrates winning the 79th Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on Sunday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 7:56 pm

Jordan Spieth, 21, has won the Masters with a record-tying score, 18 under par.

Spieth lead from the first round of the tournament in Augusta, Ga. — a feat last achieved by Raymond Floyd in 1976.

On Sunday, reports the AP, no other contender truly threatened Spieth's dominance:

No one got closer than three shots of the lead all day. Spieth shot a 2-under 70 to hold off Justin Rose and Phil Mickelson.

Rose, the 2013 U.S. Open champion playing in the final group of the major for the first time, and Mickelson were four shots back.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

It's Official: Hillary Clinton Announces Presidential Run

Hillary Clinton announces her candidacy.
Hillary Clinton campaign

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 4:26 pm

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced today that she is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2016 election.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
3:20 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

The Power Of The Screen

iStockphoto

In Kammer Kammer, a choreographic work of William Forsythe and his dancers in the Forsythe Company, some performers wear or carry cameras that send a live feed from the stage to monitors placed in view of the audience around the hall.

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Stephen Hawking Covers Monty Python's 'Galaxy Song'

Stephen Hawking flying through the universe in a new video of Monty Python's Galaxy Song.
Monty Python YouTube

Has life gotten you down?

Do things seem hard or tough?

We might have just the antidote: Stephen Hawking covering Monty Python's "Galaxy Song."

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The Two-Way
9:26 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Australia To Stop Payments To Families Who Refuse Child Vaccinations

Australian Prime minister Tony Abbott looks during a news conference at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, last month. Abbott announced Sunday that his government would close a loophole to discourage families from refusing childhood vaccinations.
Lukas Coch EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 12:51 pm

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

Australia has announced plans to halt welfare payments and childcare rebates to families who refuse to have their children vaccinated — an aggressive move aimed at clamping down on a rising number of parents who opt-out of immunizations.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott said Sunday that the government was closing a loophole and would stop payments of up to $11,500 per child (15,000 Australian dollars) for parents who don't get their kids immunized by claiming to be "conscientious objectors."

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
9:09 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Ready To Try Some Free-Range Parenting?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 10:24 am

In a radio interview with WBUR's Tom Ashbrook on March 26 , dinosaur paleontologist Scott Sampson, who's also the author of How to Raise a Wild Child, said that the average child in the U.S. today spends between 4 and 7 minutes outdoors daily — a 90 percent drop from the time spent outside by their parents.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Pope's Remarks On Armenian 'Genocide' Spark Row With Turkey

Prelates take pictures as Pope Francis celebrates an Armenian-Rite Mass to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, in St. Peter's Basilica, at the Vatican Sunday.
Gregorio Borgia AP

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 3:36 pm

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Pope Francis today touched off a diplomatic dispute between the Turkey and the Holy See when he referred to the mass killing of Armenians by Ottoman Turks during World War I as "genocide."

That view, long disputed by Turkey, caused Ankara to summon the Vatican envoy and to recall its own ambassador to the Roman Catholic Church.

"Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it," Francis said at Mass Sunday in the Armenian Catholic rite in St. Peter's Basilica.

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Shots - Health News
8:03 am
Sun April 12, 2015

What Could Go Wrong When Doctors Treat Their Own Kids?

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:32 am

Famed doctor and medical educator William Osler once said, "A physician who treats himself has a fool for a patient."

What, I wonder, does that say about us doctors who treat our own kids?

This past winter, my daughter got the flu. She was miserable: daily fevers, achiness, sore throat, stuffy head and nausea with a total loss of appetite.

We didn't run a flu test on her, which you can do with a quick nasal swab at a doctor's office. Since my wife and I are both docs, we were comfortable that her symptoms fit the diagnosis.

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The Salt
7:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Beyond Almonds: A Rogue's Gallery of Guzzlers In California's Drought

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:01 am

California is parched. Wells are running dry. Vegetable fields have been left fallow and lawns are dying. There must be some villain behind all this, right?

Of course there is. In fact, have your pick. As a public service, The Salt is bringing you several of the leading candidates. They have been nominated by widely respected national publications and interest groups.

There's just one problem: Not all of these shady characters live up to their nefarious job description. Let us explain.

1. Almonds

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The Salt
5:27 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Adventures In Vietnam — Street Food, Love And Taking Chances

Courtesy of Ecco Publishing

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:01 am

When English journalist Graham Holliday got tired of his office job in the U.K., he knew he wanted a change — a big one.

So he packed up and moved to Asia, first to Korea to teach English and ultimately, to the place that would be his home for nine years: Vietnam. As soon as he arrived, he was determined to immerse himself in Vietnamese culture — and for him, that meant food.

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The Two-Way
6:09 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened.
AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:04 pm

They may not be the most attractive creatures in the world, and they scare the life out of many people, but you have to feel bad for the bat.

Millions of them are dying across the Northeast, the Midwest and parts of the South, from a disease called White Nose Syndrome, named for a white fungus that crusts their faces.

Seven species of bats are being decimated by White Nose Syndrome; the hardest-hit species is the northern long-eared bat. Last week, the federal government listed it as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

U.S. Capitol Briefly Placed On Lockdown After Apparent Suicide

Members of law enforcement and emergency services gather and a perimeter created around the west front of the U.S. Capitol as the U.S. Capitol was on lockdown Saturday after an apparent suicide.
Carolyn Kaster AP

A "precautionary lockdown" of the U.S. Capitol and Capitol Visitor Center has been lifted today after a shot was fired in an apparent suicide, according to police.

"The suspected shooter has been neutralized but the U.S. Capitol Building has been locked down as a precautionary measure," Capitol Police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider said in a written statement after the shooting, which occurred around 1 p.m. EDT.

No one else is believed to have been hurt, The Associated Press says.

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Eating To Break 100: Longevity Diet Tips From The Blue Zones

A distinct version of the Mediterranean diet is followed on the Blue Zone island of Ikaria, Greece. It emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, beans, fruit, moderate amounts of alcohol and low quantities of meat and dairy products.
Gianluca Colla Courtesy of Blue Zones

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:16 pm

Want to live to be 100? It's tempting to think that with enough omega-3s, kale and blueberries, you could eat your way there.

But one of the key takeaways from a new book on how to "eat and live like the world's healthiest people" is that longevity is not just about food.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Part Of Fishing Boat Destroyed In Japan Tsunami Appears Off Oregon

An image provide by Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. shows a chunk of a fiberglass boat 25-30' long that was spotted off the Oregon shore west of Ona Beach on Thursday. The debris is the latest to reach the U.S. West Coast from Japan's devastating 2011 tsunami.
AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 3:26 pm

A piece of a commercial fishing boat that was ripped from Japan's coast by the March 11, 2011 tsunami has turned up on near Oregon four years later, carrying a small diaspora of live yellowtail jack fish, native to east Asian waters, according to state park officials.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Egyptian Court Sentences U.S. Citizen To Life In Prison

Egyptian Judge Mohammed Nagi Shehata reads the verdicts against Mohammed Soltan and others charged with ties to the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo on Saturday.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 12:29 pm

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

An Egyptian court has sentenced an American, Mohamed Soltan, to life in prison for having ties to the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, as the court also handed down a fourth death sentence on the leader of the Islamist group that was ousted from power in a 2013 coup.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Thai Tourist Island Rocked By Car Bomb

Thai officers examine the wreckage of a pickup truck after an explosion at Samui Island in Surat Thani province, Thailand.
AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:48 am

A car bomb in Thailand's tourist island of Samui wounded seven people in an attack that authorities have suggested is linked to activists opposed to the country's junta.

Michael Sullivan, reporting for NPR from Bangkok, says the seven were injured in the explosion that rocked the island in the Gulf of Thailand ahead of the Thai New Year festivities — a major attraction for foreign tourists.

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The Two-Way
8:46 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Kansas Man Arrested For Alleged ISIS-Inspired Bomb Plot

A water tower at Fort Riley, Kan., in a photograph taken in February. John T. Booker Jr. is accused of plotting a car bomb attack on the U.S. Army post.
Orlin Wagner AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:16 am

A man who authorities say was sympathetic to the self-declared Islamic State and plotting to carry out a suicide bombing at a U.S. Army base in Kansas, has been arrested and charged following a lengthy FBI sting operation.

John T. Booker Jr., 20, of Topeka, was apprehended Friday morning "while making final preparations for the suicide car bomb attack" he'd been planning at Fort Riley, Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda reports.

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Obama, Castro Sit For Historic Meeting At Americas Summit

Cuban President Raul Castro and President Obama shake hands as they meet on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama, on Saturday. It was the first substantive talk between leaders of the two countries in more than five decades.
Pool Scott Horsley

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 6:07 pm

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro today moved an important step closer to normalizing relations between their nations after decades of Cold War rival animosity, sitting down for the first substantive meeting in more than 50 years between leaders of the two countries.

Obama and Castro shook hands and exchanged pleasantries for a second time at the Summit of the Americas being held in Panama City.

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Shots - Health News
5:38 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Clam Cancer Spreads Along Eastern Seaboard

The blood cancer in soft-shell clams poses no risk to humans, but it does kill the shellfish.
Pat Wellenbach AP

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:30 pm

Not every clam is, as the expression goes, happy as a clam. Even shellfish, it turns out, can get cancer. And it just might be that this cancer is spread from clam to clam by rogue cells bobbing through the ocean, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Cell.

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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Attorney General To Employees: You Can't Solicit Prostitutes, Ever

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder in Washington.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Attorney General Eric Holder sent a memo to all employees at the Department of Justice with a very simple directive: You are not allowed to solicit prostitutes — ever.

The memo follows an Inspector General report that found Drug Enforcement agents had "sex parties" in Colombia with prostitutes paid for by drug cartels.

In the memo, Holder writes that employees are not allowed to solicit prostitutes even on their free time or even in countries where it is "legal or tolerated."

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The Two-Way
4:11 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

#NPRreads: In Defense Of California And Wearing The Same Thing To Work Daily

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 4:34 pm

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we bring you a bounty of six super insightful reads.

From Jennifer Ludden, a national correspondent for NPR News:

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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Alleged Mastermind Of 2008 Mumbai Attack Out On Bail

Zaki-ur Rehman Lakhvi, accused of plotting the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, raises a fist outside a court in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Jan. 1. Lakhvi was released on bail Friday.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:25 pm

Pakistan's high court has released on bail the alleged mastermind behind the 2008 terror attack in Mumbai, India, that left more than 160 people dead. Zaki-ur Rehman Lakhvi walked out of a jail Friday in the Pakistani garrison town of Rawalpindi.

The move is likely to strain already frayed relations between India and Pakistan. India lodged a strong protest with Pakistan over Lakhvi's release, according to the Times of India.

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The Salt
3:57 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Lunch, Not Landfill: Nonprofit Rescues Produce Rejected At U.S. Border

Yolanda Soto runs Borderlands Food Bank in Nogales, Ariz. Each year, the nonprofit rescues millions of pounds of nutritious and safe fruits and vegetables rejected near the U.S. border and redirects them to needy families across America.
Lisa Morehouse for NPR

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:44 pm

Just across the border from Nogales, Ariz., rows of northbound trucks line up for inspection. Over half of the produce that's grown in Mexico and imported — $4 billion worth — comes through this border crossing. Most gets distributed to all parts of the U.S. and Canada, but some fruits and vegetables get rejected before they leave the city of Nogales.

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Cool Atlantic, Warm Pacific Could Mean Few Hurricanes

Hurricane Arthur, the first hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic season, as it nears landfall in the Carolinas.
LANCE-MODIS NASA

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 4:43 pm

Seven named storms, three hurricanes — one of them major.

That's the early prediction for the 2015 Atlantic basin hurricane season by Colorado State University's Department of Atmospheric Sciences. If the forecast pans out, it would be one of the quietest seasons in decades.

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

President Obama, Raul Castro Shake Hands, Chat At Summit Of The Americas

President Obama talks with Cuban counterpart Raul Castro before Friday's inauguration of the VII Summit of the Americas in Panama City.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 10:34 pm

Update, 10:30 p.m. ET: President Obama and his Cuban counterpart, Raul Castro, exchanged greetings and a friendly handshake Friday night at the Summit of the Americas, the Associated Press reports — the first such moment in decades.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Tiny Territories Mingle At MicroCon; Passports Optional

This April 8 photo shows His Royal Highness the Grand Duke of Westarctica, aka Travis McHenry, posing in his uniform in West Hollywood, Calif.
Gabriela Alvarez AP

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 3:50 pm

Freedonia won't be sending a representative, but delegates from Molossia, Slabovia and Broslavia will all attend the MicroCon 2015 summit in Anaheim, Calif., on Saturday.

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The Salt
10:59 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Cooking With Emoji: We're Taking Eggplant Back From The Bros

Unicode/Apple

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 3:51 pm

Last week, Amanda Hess at Slate laid out the evolution of a situation truly distressing to our food-loving hearts: Over the past couple of years, it seems, the purple, elongated eggplant found on the emoji keyboard on smartphones "has risen to become America's dominant phallic fruit."

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Shots - Health News
10:40 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Bundle Of Joyful Microbes: Mom's DNA Alters Baby's Gut Bacteria

During the first year of life, a baby's gut will become home to about 1,000 species of bacteria.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 8:35 pm

Right after birth, trillions of microbes rush into a baby's gut and start to grow. Most of these critters come from the mom's skin, birth canal and gut.

But exactly which types of bacteria take up residence in an infant's gut can depend on the mother's DNA, scientists reported Thursday.

The study, published in the journal Microbiome, focuses on a microbe called Bifidobacterium that potentially benefits babies.

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Dog Didn't Bite Man, Blind Pot Customer Tells French Court

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:49 pm

A blind man who was sold actual grass instead of the grass he was looking for has told a French court that it was he, and not his guide dog, who bit a deceitful dealer who had tried to make hay off a marijuana deal.

The two ended up in a brawl, leaving the blind man in need of stitches on his ear and the accused drug dealer with a bite wound.

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Monkey See
10:13 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'The Comedians' And Cameo Appearances

NPR

This week, paired with the return of Louie, FX introduced a comedy series called The Comedians, which features Billy Crystal and Josh Gad as ... well, as Bizarro Billy Crystal and Josh Gad, forced to work together on a fictional FX sketch comedy show.

Does that make sense?

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