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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Siri, Who Are You? She Won't Say, But Her ID's Been Blown

Voice actor Susan Bennett, talking to herself (or, rather, Siri) for CNN.
CNN.com

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:43 am

We tried Friday morning to get Siri to confirm CNN's report that a real woman named Susan Bennett is the "classic" American voice of Apple's virtual assistant.

But all Siri would do is tell us, repeatedly, that "this is about you, not me." As for whether she does have a "real" voice, Siri would only say that "I guess I don't have one."

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Grim Search Resumes Off Sicily; It's Feared 300 Drowned

Hearses were waiting Friday outside a hanger at the airport in Lampedusa, Italy, where the bodies of victims from Thursday's ship wreck were being held.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:43 am

The news has only gotten worse about the sea disaster near Sicily, where a ship packed with about 500 African migrants caught fire and sank on Thursday.

When we first posted about the tragedy, the death toll stood at just under 100. Now, as Reuters reports:

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Fri October 4, 2013

4 Things To Know On Day 4 Of The Shutdown

The U.S. Capitol looms in the background as a sign on the National Mall reminds visitors that national parks are closed because of the partial federal government shutdown.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 1:45 pm

With the partial shutdown of the federal government now into its fourth day, here are four stories to help bring us all up to speed:

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Book News: Study Says Reading (Literary) Fiction Can Boost Social Skills

Jesmyn Ward won the 2011 National Book Award for Fiction for her book Salvage the Bones.
Tina Fineberg AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:33 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Business
5:06 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Part-Time Workers Search New Exchanges For Health Insurance

The specialty grocer Trader Joe's says next year it will end its policy of offering health benefits for part-time workers. Instead, the store will offer part-timers cash to help buy coverage.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 4:26 pm

Across the U.S., many part-time workers have joined the millions shopping for coverage in the new health care marketplace. Some are uninsured. Others are being pushed into the new exchanges because their employers — companies that include Trader Joe's and Home Depot — decided to drop coverage for part-timers.

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Shots - Health News
6:37 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Some Online Journals Will Publish Fake Science, For A Fee

You could do all that brain work. Or you could make it up.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:34 am

Many online journals are ready to publish bad research in exchange for a credit card number.

That's the conclusion of an elaborate sting carried out by Science, a leading mainline journal. The result should trouble doctors, patients, policymakers and anyone who has a stake in the integrity of science (and who doesn't?).

The business model of these "predatory publishers" is a scientific version of those phishes from Nigerians who want help transferring a few million dollars into your bank account.

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The Two-Way
6:16 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Shutdown Quiets NASA, So Space Station Astronauts Enjoy View

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 5:20 pm

Of all the government agencies, NASA is among the hardest hit by the government shutdown. As of Oct. 1, nearly all of its employees have been told to pack up and head home.

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

WATCH: The Capitol Hill Car Chase

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 6:37 pm

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Israel's Netanyahu Says He'd 'Consider' A Meeting With New Iranian Leader

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday.
Andrew Gombert AP

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 9:06 am

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu offered some rare, if fleeting, hope Thursday in regard to his country's relationship with Iran.

In an interview with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep, he said the election of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani "might" offer an opportunity for diplomacy and that he would "consider" meeting him.

"I don't care about the meeting. I don't have a problem with the diplomatic process," Netanyahu said.

"You're saying you would meet him?" Steve asked.

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The Salt
5:12 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

CDC: Shutdown Strains Foodborne Illness Tracking

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's PulseNet service monitors clusters of sickness linked to potentially dangerous strains of foodborne pathogens such as E.coli or salmonella.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

As we reported Tuesday, the government shutdown is pushing the nation's food safety system to its limits.

For instance, there is normally a team of eight people overseeing the critical foodborne illness tracking database PulseNet. This team identifies clusters of sickness linked to potentially dangerous strains of pathogens such as E. coli or salmonella.

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Shots - Health News
5:12 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Insurance Brokers Look For Relevance As Health Exchanges Grow

Tim Hebert, an insurance broker in Fort Collins, Colo., says he expects that the health care law will wind up being good for his business.
Kara Donahoe Courtesy of Tim Hebert

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

When states and the federal government rolled out online marketplaces to help people buy health insurance on Tuesday, you'd think that old-fashioned insurance brokers would have been worried.

All told about $200 million is being spent on a new army of people to help consumers find their way. These navigators, guides or assisters, as they're called, would seem to threaten the business of traditional brokers.

Many brokers work for small independent businesses. So are brokers at risk of becoming the next travel agents, whose ranks were thinned by online shopping?

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:44 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Why Gorillas Aren't Sexist And Orangutans Don't Rape

Patrick at the Dallas Zoo
AP

Last week the Dallas Zoo announced that it was shipping one of its largest, most popular residents to the Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens in Columbia, South Carolina.

Patrick, a 430-pound silverback male gorilla who has lived in Dallas for 18 of his 23 years, just doesn't like the company of other gorillas. He's underscored his preference for solitude by nipping or biting the females. The Riverbanks Zoo has a reputation for helping in cases like this and Patrick will move there soon.

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Shots - Health News
4:34 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Delirium In The ICU May Pose Ongoing Risk Of Thinking Problems

Hospital intensive care units save lives, but people there often suffer from delirium.
Cal EMA / Flickr

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 7:39 am

People admitted to a hospital's intensive care unit often suffer from delirium. Many of those people end up with thinking problems months after they leave the hospital, a study finds.

Nearly three quarters of the 821 ICU patients the researchers tracked suffered from delirium, which can include confusion, agitation and short-term memory loss. That's not unusual, especially for very sick people like those in this study, most of whom were on ventilators.

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Shots - Health News
2:57 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Medicaid Looks Good To A Former Young Invincible

Brad Stevens used to think he didn't need health insurance.
Sarah Varney

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

Have you heard about the young invincibles? That's the name given to young people who think nothing bad can happen to them.

Enrollment of healthy people like them in insurance under the Affordable Care Act is key to offsetting the costs of older, less healthy buyers.

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