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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Wed August 28, 2013

More Images Posted Of Accused Boston Bomber's Capture

Boston bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on April 19 as he emerged from a boat stored in a Watertown, Mass., backyard. The red dot of a police sharpshooter's laser sight can be seen on his forehead.
Mass. State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy Boston Magazine

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 11:32 am

Boston Magazine has posted 48 photos taken by Massachusetts State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy on the day and night that Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was captured in Watertown, Mass.

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Shots - Health News
9:44 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Despite Distaste For Health Law, Americans Oppose Defunding

Defunding strikes most Americans as the wrong prescription for the Affordable Care Act.
Ricardo Reitmeyer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:49 pm

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act often talk about how unpopular it is.

And this month's tracking poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation bears them out. Negative views of the law (42 percent) top positive ones (37 percent).

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The Two-Way
8:04 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Fire's Threat To Bay Area's Water Supply May Come Later

A charred caution sign just outside of California's Yosemite National Park.
David McNew Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 11:32 am

The huge "Rim Fire" in and around California's Yosemite National Park hasn't yet caused problems at the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir that provides water to 2.6 million people in the Bay Area. There have been fears that falling ash will pollute the water there.

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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Click Here For 'The New York Times' While It's Being Hacked

The New York Times' alternate site.
http://news.nytco.com/

The New York Times' website isn't working for us, and many other users, again this morning. As All Tech Considered reported Tuesday evening, the Times appears to be the victim of another hacking by the Syrian Electronic Army — a pro-Assad organization that has previously taken over the websites of other U.S.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Britain Seeks U.N. OK For Military Action Against Syria

who says it is time for the U.N. Security Council "to live up to its responsibilities on Syria."" href="/post/britain-seek-un-ok-military-action-against-syria" class="noexit lightbox">
British Prime Minister David Cameron, who says it is time for the U.N. Security Council "to live up to its responsibilities on Syria."
Stefan Wermuth Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:39 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Philip Reeves reports on the resolution Britain will put before the U.N. Security Council
  • From 'Morning Edition': Alastair Crooke on the crisis in Syria

Some of the latest developments related to the crisis in Syria and the increasing likelihood that the U.S. and its allies will soon launch missile strikes on targets there in response to last week's alleged use of chemical weapons by the regime of President Bashar Assad:

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The Salt
3:33 am
Wed August 28, 2013

You Say 'Kubbeh,' I Say 'Kibbeh,' Let's Eat 'Em All Right Now

At the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, kids learn how to make kubbeh hamusta, a popular regional dumpling from Kurdistan.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

People across the Levant love their dumplings, even if they can't agree on a name. Some say kubbeh; others say kibbeh. In Egypt, you might hear kobeba.

In Jerusalem, there are perhaps as many variations of the kubbeh as there are cultures in the city.

One popular version consists of meat wrapped in bulgur, then deep fried. Dip one in tahini for a crunchy snack.

But at the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, chef Udi Shlomi prefers to teach kids to make kubbeh hamusta.

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The Two-Way
7:17 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Scientists Say They've Confirmed A New Element

The periodic table.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 7:24 pm

Scientists in Sweden say they have confirmed a new, super-heavy element that was first proposed by Russian scientists in 2004. The element with the atomic number 115 has yet to be named.

In a press release, Lund University says a group of international scientists led by physicists from Lund University, made the element by shooting a beam of calcium, which has 20 protons, into a thin film of americium, which has 95 protons.

For less than a second, the new element had 115 protons.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

USA Swimming Faces Lingering Doubts Over Sexual Abuse

Attorney Robert Allard, seen here with former swimmer Jancy Thompson in 2010, says USA Swimming still needs to improve its handling of sexual abuse claims. The organization is also facing congressional scrutiny.
Ben Margot AP

There's concern the sport of swimming still may be dealing with a sexual abuse problem in the United States.

It's been three years since revelations emerged in the media. A number of in-depth reports in 2010 likened the situation in swimming to the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal: Coaches molesting under-age female swimmers; some of the abuse continuing for years without punishment.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Vaccinating Babies For Rotavirus Protects The Whole Family

An artistic illustration of the rotavirus.
petersimoncik iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:40 pm

A 7-year-old vaccine that has drastically cut intestinal infections in infants is benefiting the rest of America, too.

A study published Tuesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that vaccinating infants against rotavirus has also caused a striking decline in serious infections among older children and adults who didn't get vaccinated.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

For Some Kids, Summer Camp Includes Seeing Dad In Prison

In the Father to Child Summer Camp Behind Bars program, kids can bond with their fathers while staying at a campground near prison. Geray Williams, an inmate at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Md., gets a hug from his son Sanchez during the weeklong camp in 2010.
Timothy Jacobsen AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:57 pm

The idea of taking a child to prison for a week may bring to mind visions of "Scared Straight" programs. But the Father to Child Summer Camp Behind Bars does just that — and the goal is to let kids bond with their fathers, who might be incarcerated far from their families.

The unique summer camp lodges children at a campground near prisons in Maryland and North Carolina, according to Here & Now, the show from WBUR and NPR. The kids visit their fathers in prison each day.

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Shots - Health News
3:58 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Patients Love A Gentler Approach To Surgery, But Surgeons Balk

We know you'd rather skip the fasting and bowel prep. But that's the way we've always done it.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:37 pm

Surgery can be a necessary misery, endured in hope of health.

But what if you took away the misery, and kept the benefits?

When hospitals quit subjecting patients to prolonged fasting, nasogastric tubes, abdominal drains, and other commonplaces of surgical care, a study finds, patients feel less pain and recover faster.

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Shots - Health News
3:55 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

After Missteps In HIV Care, South Africa Finds Its Way

A nurse takes a blood sample from Nkosi Minenhle, 15, in a mobile clinic set up to test students for HIV at Madwaleni High School in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:39 pm

South Africa has more people with HIV than any other country in the world.

Roughly 5.5 million of its 53 million citizens are infected with the virus. In some of the hardest hit parts of the country, one-third of women of childbearing age are HIV positive.

Now, after years of delay and mistakes, South Africa is transforming how it approaches the disease.

The South African government is simplifying AIDS care, cutting treatment costs and providing antiviral drugs to almost 2 million people every day.

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Retired Gen. Wesley Clark Talks About Precedents And Syria

Former NATO Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, Army Gen. Wesley Clark (Ret.) in 2009.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Retired Gen. Wesley Clark, who was the NATO commander during the 1999 Operation Allied Force in Kosovo, tells All Things Considered that the situation the United Staes is facing in Syria is best compared to the U.S. bombing of Iraq in 1993.

Clark told NPR's Melissa Block that the only similarity between what's going on in Syria, today, and what happened during the Allied intervention in Kosovo, is Russia's unwillingness to support a United Nations resolution supporting a strike.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

U.S. 'Ought To Respect' State Marijuana Laws, Sen. Leahy Says

Sen. Patrick Leahy is calling on the Justice Department to state its position on marijuana's legal status. Here, a man inspects a shirt depicting the U.S. flag made of marijuana symbols, at a medical marijuana show in Los Angeles earlier this year.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

The Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says he's done waiting for answers about how the Justice Department will handle marijuana offenses in states that have legalized small amounts of the drug.

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