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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Wed November 20, 2013

White Supremacist Murderer Who Shot Larry Flynt Is Executed

Joseph Paul Franklin in a photo taken in 2012 by the Missouri Department of Corrections.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 10:47 am

Joseph Paul Franklin, the white supremacist who was convicted of eight murders, suspected in as many as 20 others and who shot Hustler publisher Larry Flynt in 1978, was put to death Wednesday in Missouri.

St. Louis Public Radio followed the news overnight as Franklin ran out of legal challenges.

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The Two-Way
7:37 am
Wed November 20, 2013

'I Relied Upon My Faith,' George W. Bush Tells Jay Leno

Former President George W. Bush gave Tonight Show host Jay Leno a painting Tuesday night. Since leaving the White House, Bush has taken up painting.
The Tonight Show with Jay Leno's YouTube channel

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 10:37 am

Making a relatively rare appearance on national TV, former President George W. Bush told Tonight Show host Jay Leno on Tuesday's show that "I relied upon my faith, my family helped a lot and I had a good team around me" while in the White House.

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The Two-Way
7:27 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Book News: Charlotte Zolotow, Author Of Ethereal Children's Books, Dies

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 9:42 am

(This post was updated at 9:40 a.m.)

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:01 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Life Is Slowly Returning To Shattered Philippine City

Some people marched in the rain Tuesday in the Philippine city of Tacloban, which was crushed by Typhoon Haiyan.
David Guttenfelder AP
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn, in the Philippines, talks with Steve Inskeep

There was almost nothing left standing or working in the Philippines city of Tacloban after Typhoon Haiyan tore through on Nov. 8.

No electricity. No clean water. No undamaged buildings.

As one official told NPR's Anthony Kuhn, "we have citizens, but no city."

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The Two-Way
2:47 am
Wed November 20, 2013

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

NASA's PhoneSat, a 4-by-4-inch CubeSat satellite, will use an Android smartphone as its motherboard. It was among the 29 satellites launched Tuesday from Wallops Island, Va. Another miniature satellite, developed by high school students, also was on board.
Dominic Hart AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 12:51 pm

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va.

Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.

The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.

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The Two-Way
6:08 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Postal Service Hopes 'Harry Potter' Stamps Spell Revenue

The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service hopes its new Harry Potter stamps will spark enthusiasm among a new generation of stamp collectors.
USPS

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:10 am

Hold onto your owls, Harry Potter fans. The U.S. Postal Service is hoping you'll send your letters with one of 20 new Potter-themed stamps it unveiled Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
6:02 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Florida Rep. Trey Radel Charged With Cocaine Possession

Rep. Henry "Trey" Radel, R-Fla., shown on Capitol Hill.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 8:22 pm

Florida Rep. Henry "Trey" Radel is being charged with cocaine possession and faces arraignment on Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

Authorities say the freshman Republican was found in possession of cocaine on Oct. 29, a misdemeanor offense, but provided no other details.

NPR's Tamara Keith says the charge carries a statutory maximum sentence of 180 days of imprisonment and/or a fine of $1,000.

Radel, 37, represents Florida's 19th District, which covers parts of the Gulf Coast, Fort Myers and Naples.

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The Two-Way
6:01 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Robert Conley, First Host Of 'All Things Considered,' Dies

Robert Conley celebrated the 40th anniversary of NPR's All Things Considered in the network's Studio 2A.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Robert Conley, the first host of NPR's All Things Considered, died over the weekend.

It was Conley who on May 3, 1971, set the tone for NPR's flagship newsmagazine. As one of the show's current hosts Robert Siegel explains, Conley established that the program would be different.

To begin that first broadcast, for example, Conley launched into an unscripted, five-minute riff that introduced a 23-minute piece covering a massive anti-war protest in Washington.

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The Salt
5:54 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

What's Trending In Food Magazines? Thanksgiving Classics

Three food magazines featured a pumpkin pie finished with a bruleed top for Thanksgiving this year, according to The Bitten Word.
Courtesy of TheBittenWord.com

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:53 pm

For many of us, Thanksgiving is just not the same without turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. In other words, tradition tends to trump trendy.

Yet food magazines always encourage going beyond the usual suspects. And who among us has time to try them out in advance of Thanksgiving?

Zach Patton and Clay Dunn, that's who. They're the married couple behind the food blog The Bitten Word.

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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

New York's Graffiti Mecca, 5Pointz, Was Whitewashed Overnight

People walk in front of New York's graffiti iconic spot "5Pointz," after the building was painted white in New York.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

It was a reversal of traditional roles: Painters contracted by the owners of an unoccupied building in Queens, New York, worked under the cover of night Tuesday morning to white wash years of graffiti that had turned 5Pointz into a street art mecca.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

India's Solution To The Monkey Menace? Put 'Em On The Pill!

A monkey invades the field during a cricket match in Ahmedabad, India, in 2012.
Gareth Copley Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 7:12 pm

Officials in some of India's major cities, who have been fighting a losing battle to control troops of marauding monkeys who snatch food, chew Internet cables and romp through government buildings, have decided to take drastic action: They are putting them on the pill.

Or at least oral contraceptives are part of a strategy that also will involve outright sterilization of thousands of rhesus monkeys.

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Shots - Health News
5:06 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Why College Campuses Get Hit By Meningitis Outbreaks

Six students and a visitor have fallen ill with meningitis at Princeton University in New Jersey, shown here in August 2013. All have recovered or are recovering, officials said.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

For the past nine months, Princeton University in New Jersey has been trying to halt an outbreak of bacterial meningitis in its students without success. So it's going to offer students a vaccine that's not yet approved for broader use in the US.

Since bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the brain and spinal cord that can cause brain damage and death, having it on campus is no small matter.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Researchers Find Ancient Seawater Had Twice The Salt

A map showing the impact areas of a large asteroid or comet that struck the Chesapeake Bay some 35 million years ago.
U.S. Geological Survey

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:57 pm

Scientists have discovered a pocket of ancient seawater that's been trapped underground near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay since the time of the dinosaurs — strong evidence that the Atlantic Ocean was once much saltier than today.

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The Two-Way
3:30 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Beyond The Caricature: 5 Things To Know About Mayor Rob Ford

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford leaves his office after councilors passed motions Monday to limit his powers.
Chris Young The Canadian Press

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 4:50 pm

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was thrust into the international spotlight after he admitted to smoking crack. Since then, a caricature of the politician has emerged: a bumbling, error-prone addict, whose everyman persona has helped him maintain his popularity in Canada's most populous city.

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