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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Fri August 2, 2013

U.S. Unemployment Sinks To 7.4 Percent; 162,000 Jobs Added In July

America's unemployment rate sank to 7.4 percent in July, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says. A hiring sign is seen in a store window in Alexandria, Va.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:11 am

America's unemployment rate sank to 7.4 percent in July, a drop of two-tenths of a percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says in its monthly summary of the U.S. economic situation. But employers added 162,000 jobs last month, coming in below economists' expectations.

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The Two-Way
8:04 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Snowden Has Job Offers, Place To Live, Russian Lawyer Says

Edward Snowden has chosen where to live in Russia, which granted him asylum Thursday, his lawyer said. Here, Snowden is seen at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport on July 12. At left is WikiLeaks' Sarah Harrison.
Courtesy of Human Rights Watch

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:20 am

NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who spent more than a month at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport before being granted a one-year asylum Thursday, has picked out a place to live in Russia, his attorney there says.

Snowden is wanted on charges of espionage by the United States for leaking classified documents about secret U.S. surveillance programs. His departure from the Moscow airport ended, temporarily at least, weeks of uncertainty over his fate. He had applied to several other countries for asylum, as well.

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Book News: Battle Rages On In Amazon Vs. Overstock Price War

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:51 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Fri August 2, 2013

U.S. Embassies To Close Sunday, And Possibly Beyond, For Safety

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:46 pm

Few details have emerged about the U.S. plan to shut down embassies that would normally be open this Sunday. A senior State Department official says that the U.S. facilities may be closed for more days, as well. The closures are being described as "precautionary steps" that are being taken "out of an abundance of caution."

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The Salt
3:18 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Massachusetts Revives The Lost Art Of Making Sea Salt

The Martha's Vineyard beach where Heidi Feldman collects saltwater to make sea salt.
Courtesy of Heidi Feldman

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

"Look for a house, barn, paddock, barking dogs and screeching peacocks."

Those were Heidi Feldman's instructions to me to find Down Island Farm in Vineyard Haven on Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

She forgot to mention the ram, free roaming chickens and miniature horse. But I managed to find it anyway.

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The Two-Way
6:51 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Hawaii Homeless Initiative Would Send Some Back To Mainland

A homeless man collects cans on Waikiki Beach in 2010 in Honolulu. Under a new pilot program, some homeless people will get help from the state to reunite with relatives on the mainland.
Marco Garcia AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 7:07 pm

A new homeless initiative in Hawaii is raising some eyebrows, and the department in charge of implementing it has concerns of its own.

As part of a larger housing bill in July, the state Legislature approved $100,000 per year for a three-year pilot project that would help get some homeless people off the island and back to their families on the mainland. Participants must leave voluntarily.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

3 Opinions On Whether Snowden Should Fight From Abroad

Edward Snowden's new refugee documents, which were shown by his lawyer.
Maxim Shemetov Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:57 am

Edward Snowden's father, Lonnie, had a dramatic change of heart this week: Back in June, he sent a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder in which he told him that if the U.S. promised not to detain or silence Edward before a trial, his son would be willing to return to the United States.

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Shots - Health News
5:21 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Acetaminophen Can Cause Rare, Serious Skin Disorders, FDA Warns

Acetaminophen has been added to the list of over-the-counter painkillers that can cause rare but deadly skin reactions.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 1:55 pm

Taking acetaminophen causes rare but potentially deadly skin reactions in some people, the Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

The goal is not to scare people off Tylenol and other acetaminophen-based pain relievers, which are among the most popular medications in the United States, federal officials say.

Instead, they want people to be aware that these skin conditions can be a side effect of using acetaminophen, so that if they notice a rash or other skin reaction they can stop taking the drug and quickly get to a doctor.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

In New Video Game, China Seizes Disputed Islands From Japan

Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force escort ship Kurama leads other vessels during a fleet review amid heightened tension last year over the disputed Senkaku/Diaoyu islands.
Itsuo Inouye AP

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 8:11 am

Chinese gamers may soon be able to settle by force a thorny international dispute between their government and Japan over who controls a small chain of islands in the East China Sea.

The basic platform of the newly released Glorious Mission Online was developed as a training tool for the People's Liberation Army. Game maker Giant Interactive Group (GIG) has expanded the "first-person shooter" game with a simulation of a Chinese amphibious assault on the Senkaku islands, as they are known in Tokyo, or Diaoyu, as Beijing calls them.

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The Salt
5:17 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

What Poisoned Pomegranates Tell Us About Food Safety

The label for the berry blend recalled in June because of pomegranates linked to a hepatitis A outbreak.
Food and Drug Administration

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 5:48 pm

Imported food is getting the kind of attention these days that no product wants. Health officials in Iowa and Nebraska are blaming salad greens for making hundreds of people sick with a parasite called cyclospora. That parasite usually comes from the tropics, so it's likely the salad did, too. Earlier this summer, pomegranate seeds from Turkey were linked to an outbreak of hepatitis A.

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The Two-Way
5:01 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Florida's Education Chief Resigns Over Grading Scandal

Florida's former Commissioner of Education Tony Bennett.
Florida Department of Education

In education circles, Tony Bennett is widely known as a hard-charging Republican reformer associated with Jeb Bush's prescriptions for fixing public schools: charter schools, private school vouchers, tying teacher pay to student test scores and grading schools on a A through F scale.

Bennett resigned from his post as Florida's education chief this morning when a controversy over the last of those things — the school grades — caught up with him.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Former Goldman Trader Found Liable For Billion-Dollar Fraud

Former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre walks to a federal court in Manhattan with his attorneys Thursday. A jury found Tourre liable in a massive securities fraud case.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:59 pm

A federal jury in New York City has found that Fabrice Tourre, the former Goldman Sachs trader who regulators say caused investors to lose $1 billion, is liable in the mortgage securities fraud case filed against him by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Regulators say Tourre, 34, a native of France who was nicknamed "Fab" in his office, packaged toxic subprime mortgages into a collateralized debt obligation that was sold to investors under the name Abacus in 2007.

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The Salt
3:57 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Move Over, Dippin' Dots: 5 Futuristic Ice Creams

Wikipearl ice cream doesn't require plastic packaging because it is contained in edible skin.
Agence VFC Relations Publics

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 3:01 pm

When Dippin' Dots emerged in 1987 with the slogan "Ice Cream of the Future," its liquid nitrogen-blasted pellets seemed about as cutting edge as ice cream could get.

But ice cream has come a long way since then. Now, ice cream revolutionaries are updating our notions of ice cream texture and flavor with bioengineering and sheer chutzpah. Welcome to the new future of ice cream.

Lunar Ice Cream

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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

U.S. Will Close All Embassies Sunday Over Security Concerns

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 6:43 pm

The United States will close all of its embassies on Sunday because of security concerns, State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said Thursday.

AFP reports:

" 'The Department of State has instructed certain US embassies and consulates to remain closed or to suspend operations on Sunday, August 4,' Harf told reporters.

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Shots - Health News
3:41 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Victims Of Bullying Are More Likely To Be Arrested As Adults

Children who are bullied over time are more apt to struggle as adults.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:48 pm

You'd expect bullies to grow up to get in trouble with the law.

But children who are consistently bullied also are more likely to run afoul of the law as adults, including being arrested and jailed.

Almost 14 percent of people who said they were bullied repeatedly in childhood and their teens had been in prison, compared to 6 percent of people who weren't bullied, according to a study.

Women who were repeatedly bullied before age 18 were more likely to use alcohol or drugs than men, and also more likely to be arrested and incarcerated.

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