NPR Blogs

The Salt
12:12 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Heavy Rains Send Iowa's Precious Soil Downriver

Soil erosion after five inches or more of rain fell in one hour across portions of Western Iowa in 2013.
USDA Natural Resources Conservation

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:33 pm

What a difference a year makes. Last year at this time, the Midwest was heading into one of the worst droughts in decades. Now much of the region is soggy.

But the biggest loser from this year's heavy rains? The land itself.

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The Two-Way
11:30 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Jury Begins Deliberation On Verdict In George Zimmerman Trial

George Zimmerman arrives in the courtroom for closing arguments in his murder trial on Friday in Sanford, Fla.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:23 pm

(This story was last updated at 6:20 p.m. ET)

Six jurors left a Sanford, Fla., courtroom on Friday to begin deliberating the fate of George Zimmerman, who stands accused of murder in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

After several hours of deliberations and a request for an inventory of evidence on Friday, the jury, all women, adjourned for the evening. It was scheduled to resume at 9 a.m. Saturday.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Report: Beijing, Shanghai Among Worst Airports For Delays

A domestic departures board shows flight delays at Beijing's international airport in January.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:42 pm

If you think flight delays in the U.S. are bad, try China.

A new report from travel industry monitor FlightStats says China is the world's worst when it comes to delays at major airports.

FlightStats compiled statistics from June for the report, determining that eight of the world's worst airports for flight delays were in China. Beijing and Shanghai topped the list, although New York's LaGuardia had the highest number of flight cancellations.

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Monkey See
10:10 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: The Big Three

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

Back in the summer of 2010, we sat down to do our very first Pop Culture Happy Hour. We talked about Community, Wipeout, Doctor Who, and Netflix streaming. And now, three years later, we sit down for our 147th episode — which is, appropriately enough, all about the number three.

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The Two-Way
8:57 am
Fri July 12, 2013

On The Economy: Inflation Accelerates; Fed Rumors Rise

A surge in prices at the pump fueled inflation in June.
Jonathan Fickies Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:55 pm

The morning's major economic news:

-- Inflation. Wholesale prices rose 0.8 percent in June from May, fueled by a 2.9 percent surge in the price of energy products, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says. As drivers can confirm, a 7.2 percent jump in the cost of gasoline was responsible for most of that boost.

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Monkey See
8:35 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Sharknado' Dares To Ask: Is It Going To Rain Giant Man-Eating Sharks?

Aubrey Peeples as Fin's daughter in Sharknado. Which really happened.
Syfy

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:27 am

If you have a Twitter account, there's an excellent chance you already know about Sharknado, SyFy's meteorological-marine horror movie that premiered last night. When I tell you that a lot of people were tweeting about Sharknado, I'm not lying.

Not to mention ... well, you know. Possibly NPR personalities.

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Book News: 'The Great Gypsy'? School Reading List Is Error-Riddled

A student of the Barack Obama elementary school in Hempstead, N.Y. walks past a board displaying student essays on the president during the official name changing ceremony in 2009.
Mary Altaffer AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Snowden Hopes For Temporary Asylum In Russia

Edward Snowden, center, at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Friday. At left is WikiLeaks' Sarah Harrison. The woman at right is unidentified at this time.
Courtesy of Human Rights Watch

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:02 pm

(We most recently added information to the top of this post at 11:15 a.m. ET. Click here for more updates. )

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The Two-Way
3:22 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Chuck Foley, Co-Creator Of Twister, Dies At 82

Festivalgoers play a giant game of Twister during the Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts in southwest England last month.
Andrew Cowie AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:40 am

One of the men responsible for getting people tied up in knots while they played Twister has died.

Charles "Chuck" Foley died earlier this month in St. Paul, Minn. He was 82.

Foley and his business partner Neil Rabens invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. The pair originally called it Pretzel, and it was Milton Bradley who came up with the name Twister.

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Shots - Health News
3:16 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Messy Rollout Of Health Law Echoes Medicare Drug Expansion

Back in 2006, President Bush and Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt talked with reporters during a trip to Florida, where Bush spoke to volunteers helping seniors sign up for the Medicare prescription drug benefit.
Mike Stocker AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:13 am

It hasn't been a good week for the Affordable Care Act. After announcements by the administration of several delays of key portions of the law, Republicans returned to Capitol Hill and began piling on.

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The Two-Way
7:15 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Prison Sterilization Report Prompts Call For Inquiry In California

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:18 pm

California lawmakers are calling for an investigation into allegations that 148 female prisoners underwent tubal ligation surgeries without the state's required approval. Some inmates said they had been pressured into undergoing the sterilization procedure, according to a report by the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
6:13 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

To The '13.7' Community: I Love You, Man!

iStockphoto.com

Two hundred and eleven comments and counting — about poetry! We here at 13.7 have come to understand what the hot-button issues are for most people. The strongest responses happen in reaction to posts about religion and science, animal welfare, diet and children's issues.

Then — unexpectedly — my post on the relationship between science and poetry launched a vibrant and compelling discussion about the nature and importance of poetry.

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The Salt
6:01 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Are Antibiotics On The Farm Risky Business?

These pigs, newly weaned from their mothers, are at their most vulnerable stage of life. They're getting antibiotics in their water to ward off bacterial infection.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:25 pm

You've probably seen the labels on meat in the store: "Raised without antibiotics." They're a selling point for people who don't like how many drugs are used on chickens, turkey, hogs and beef cattle.

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The Salt
5:49 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Why Doctors Oppose Force-Feeding Guantanamo Hunger Strikers

To raise awareness about force-feeding, Yasiin Bey, the musician and actor formerly known as Mos Def, in a video voluntarily underwent the same procedure administered to prisoners who refuse solid food in political protest while they are held in Guantanamo Bay.
Reprieve/Asif Kapadia

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 6:26 pm

For centuries, the act of refusing food has turned human bodies into effective political bargaining chips. And so it's no surprise that the prisoners desperate to leave Guantanamo after, in some cases, nearly a dozen years there, have turned to hunger strikes on and off since 2005 to try to win their release.

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