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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Did Miley Cyrus 'Flirt With Bad Taste' Or Dive Right In?

Singers Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke during Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards in New York.
Lucas Jackson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 11:33 am

You may have to turn off your television today if you wish to avoid seeing clips of one-time squeaky clean Disney star Miley Cyrus as she "twerked and gyrated, stripped and swayed," Sunday night at the MTV Video Music Awards.

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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Reminder: 'Book News' Is On Vacation

Not a bad idea on a sunny day.
Salvatore Di Nolfi EPA/Landov

Just in case you're looking for Annalisa Quinn's "daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly," here's a reminder:

She's on vacation this week. So this might be the time to read one of those books she's been writing about for us in recent months.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Talk Of Strike On Syria Moves From 'Will It Happen?' To When

Ammunition was stacked up Saturday in an area near Damascus that is controlled by forces loyal to President Bashar Assad.
Khaled al-Hariri Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:06 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': Aaron David Miller speaks with Renee Montagne about the situation in Syria
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Larry Abramson talks with David Greene about the military options

With U.S. officials saying there's little doubt that President Bashar Assad's regime used chemical weapons on the Syrian people last week, and with U.S. Navy ships moving toward that country's coast, it now seems to be a question of "when" not "whether" America will strike military targets inside that nation.

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Shots - Health News
3:45 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Sweet Cigarillos And Cigars Lure Youths To Tobacco, Critics Say

Candy-flavored cigars like these in a shop in Albany, N.Y., are the focus of efforts to restrict sales of sweet-flavored tobacco.
Hans Pennink Associated Press

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 2:56 pm

The good news: Cigarette sales are down by about a third over the past decade. Not so for little cigars and cigarillos. Their sales more than doubled over the same time period, in large part owing to the growing popularity of these little cigars among teenagers and 20-somethings.

The appeal among young people has lots to do with the large variety of candylike flavors in the little cigars, according to Jennifer Cantrell, director of research and evaluation at the anti-tobacco Legacy Foundation.

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The Salt
3:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

A potsticker prepared by Chef Scott Drewno at the Washington, D.C., restaurant The Source.
Heather Rousseau for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 9:35 am

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from?

No one knows for sure, but Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif., thinks dumplings have been around for a very long time. "Almost without doubt, there are prehistoric dumplings," he says.

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Shots - Health News
3:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Kids With Costly Medical Issues Get Help, But Not Enough

Katie Doderer, with dad Mark, big sister Emily, and mom Marcy, has a rare medical condition that requires 24-hour use of a ventilator.
courtesy of the Doderer family

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:56 am

Katie Doderer is a very poised 15-year-old with short blond hair and a wide smile. She's a straight A student who loves singing, dancing and performing in musicals.

This could be considered something of a miracle.

"I have a complex medical condition known as congenital central hypoventilation – blah—syndrome. CCHS," Katie explains, stumbling on the full name of her malady. "Basically my brain doesn't tell me to breathe. So I am reliant on a mechanical ventilator."

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The Two-Way
3:01 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter near Dahla Dam, Afghanistan in July 2012.
Ho/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 4:04 pm

Update at 3:14 p.m. ET. Carter Receives Medal Of Honor:

Saying he represented "the essence of true heroism," President Obama presented Army Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter with the nation's highest military honors, this afternoon.

"As these soldiers and families will tell you, they're a family forged in battle, and loss, and love," Obama said, according to the AP.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Army staff sergeant who Monday afternoon will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony has mixed emotions.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

If You Believe The Farmer's Almanac, Get A Good Coat

Snow sticks to the trees along Levee Road during a winter storm in December of 2012 in Baraboo, Wisconsin.
Tom Lynn Getty Images

If you believe The Farmer's Almanac, this upcoming winter is going to be pretty brutal for most of the country.

This is how Caleb Weatherbee, the pseudonym of the 197-year-old publication's official forecaster, put it in a piece today, announcing the new forecast:

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Ginsburg Says She Plans To Stay On High Court No Matter The President

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in October of 2010.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

In a rare interview, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she plans to stay on the court, no matter who is president.

Ginsburg, 80 and the leader of the court's liberal wing, spoke to The New York Times at length on Friday. The whole piece is a worth a read, but here two highlights.

On her potential retirement, she said:

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:00 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Seeing Music For What It Is

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 3:32 pm

Music is not sound art, even though musical ideas find natural expression in melody and harmony, timbre and rhythm. Music may be carried in sound, but only in the way that our applause at a concert is carried in sound. Applause is clapping; it is stomping and shouting. These are noisy, but they are not noise. They are not sound as a physicist might think of sound. Music is to sound as gesture is to mere movement. Physics is only part of the story.

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

New York A.G. Sues Donald Trump Over 'Unlicensed' University

Donald Trump, chairman and president of the Trump Organization and founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, delivers remarks during the second day of the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in March.
Alex Wong Getty Images

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is suing Donald Trump's for-profit investment school, "Trump University," which the lawsuit claims operated as an unlicensed educational institution for about six years and was essentially an "elaborate bait-and-switch" operation.

The New York Times reports:

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The Two-Way
9:59 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Wildfire Near Yosemite Spreads, Threatens Ancient Trees

A firefighter uses a hose to douse the flames of the Rim Fire on Saturday near Groveland, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:01 am

The massive wildfire that's burning on the northwest edge of Yosemite National Park is spreading, threatening to destroy thousands of rural homes and also posing a threat to beloved ancient sequoias.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Syria Will Allow U.N. To Inspect Chemical Weapons Claims

In this photo taken on a government organized media tour, a Syrian army soldier walks on a street in the Jobar neighborhood of Damascus, Syria, on Saturday.
AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 8:38 pm

This post was last updated at 8:36 p.m. ET. (For the latest updates click here.)

The United Nations says it is sending inspectors to the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack in Damascus, Syria.

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Shots - Health News
5:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Same Tents That Seal Storms Out Can Seal Carbon Monoxide In

Headlamps make cold nights cozier, but leave the fuel-burning lanterns and stoves outside.
Gopal Vijayaraghavan Flickr

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:31 am

Staying snug within a watertight tent as a storm rages around you is one of the joys of modern camping and modern tents.

But if the weather suddenly turns nasty on your next camping trip, or nights are just colder than you expected, don't be tempted to bring your cook stove inside. Levels of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) from the burning stove can build up fast.

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The Salt
5:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Dishwasher Cooking: Make Your Dinner While Cleaning The Plates

Food writer Dan Pashman says poached pears are great in the dishwasher. We're not sure about the asparagus, but we'll let you know after the cycle finishes.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:10 pm

My mom is a creative cook. And a darn good one at that.

But when she told me and my sister — way back in 1995 — that she had started cooking salmon in the dishwasher, we just rolled our eyes and shook our heads. Here comes a kitchen catastrophe.

An hour later, mom proved her teenage daughters wrong once again. The salmon was tender, moist and super flavorful. In some ways, it was better than her fish cooked in the oven.

Flash-forward 18 years, and dishwasher cuisine seems to be making a comeback.

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