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The Salt
1:24 pm
Fri June 14, 2013

Nudging Detroit: Program Doubles Food Stamp Bucks In Grocery Stores

A customer in the produce section at Metro Foodland, one of the Detroit grocery stores participating in a healthy food incentive program for people with SNAP benefits. The store will add a section of specially marked local produce as part of the program.
Courtesy of the Fair Food Network

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 2:35 pm

In recent years, programs that double the value of food stamp dollars spent at farmers markets have generated a lot of attention. The basic idea: Spend, say, $10 in food stamps and get an extra $10 credit for purchases at the market.

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The Salt
12:54 pm
Fri June 14, 2013

Sorry, Dr. Oz, Green Coffee Can't Even Slim Down Chubby Mice

Raw, green coffee beans. To roast or not?
Aidan via Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 1:54 pm

The diet world has a new golden child: green coffee extract.

A "miracle fat burner!" "One of the most important discoveries made" in weight loss science, the heart surgeon Dr. Mehmet Oz said about the little pills — which are produced by grinding up raw, unroasted coffee, and then soaking the result in alcohol to pull out the antioxidants.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Iranians Go To Polls In Vote To Replace Ahmadinejad

Ali Akbar Velayati, a conservative presidential candidate, shows his ink-stained finger as he votes at a polling station on Friday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:02 pm

Millions of Iranians cast ballots Friday in elections to replace incumbent President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, a race that is being characterized as a potential challenge to the country's ruling Islamic clerics.

A slate of conservatives tacitly backed by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei are facing off against the lone moderate, Hasan Rowhan, a former nuclear negotiator.

Other candidates include Saeed Jalili, also a nuclear negotiator; Tehran Mayor Mohammad Bagher Qalibaf; and Khamenei's diplomatic adviser, Ali Akbar Velayati.

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Monkey See
11:44 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Tony Awards And Shared Songs

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We taped this week's podcast while still giddy from the effects of the very fine Tony Awards broadcast, so we begin by sharing some thoughts about that killer opening number, some of the other musical happenings, our feelings on Pippin, Phantom and other theater pieces, and whether we are suffering from, as Glen puts it, "Doogie Fatigue."

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Monkey See
11:00 am
Fri June 14, 2013

At The Movies, The Women Are Gone

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 7:33 pm

I live in the D.C. metro area, which is a very good place to find films. If you don't live in New York or Los Angeles, it's about the best you can do. I'm within 10 miles of a multiplicity of multiplexes, not to mention four theaters I would consider "art house" theaters or at least mixes of wider-appeal fare and smaller stuff.

According to Fandango and some back-of-the-envelope math, excluding documentaries and animation, there are 617 movie showings today — that's just today, Friday — within 10 miles of my house.

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Ignoring Racist Tweets, 11-Year-Old Nails National Anthem ... Again

Sebastien de la Cruz, known as San Antonio's Little Mariachi, sings the national anthem before the start of Game 4 of the NBA finals on Thursday.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 3:24 pm

Something pretty magical happened at last night's NBA finals: Sebastien de la Cruz, the 11-year-old who sang the national anthem on Tuesday, was back on Thursday to prove his critics wrong.

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Shots - Health News
10:10 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Scientists Go Medieval To Solve Ancient Leprosy Puzzle

A woodcut from the 1800s, Healing the Lepers, depicts the common tableau of Jesus healing a leper as his disciples look on.
Images from the History of Medicine

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 2:51 pm

Look through a series of 15th-century woodcuts, and you'll find that the leper is as much an icon of medieval art as the crown or the cross.

Leprosy was so common in Europe during the Middle Ages that it's estimated 1 in 30 people was infected with the bacteria. But by the turn of the 16th century, after the Crusades had swept across Europe, the disease mysteriously disappeared. And it never returned.

This left scientists puzzled. Did the bacteria mutate to become less harmful, or did Europeans become resistant to the germs?

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Fri June 14, 2013

2 Killed, 379 Homes Destroyed By Wildfire In Colorado

A fire that's been burning since Tuesday continues to consume acreage near Colorado Springs in Black Forest, Colorado.
Tom Cooper Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 7:37 pm

While firefighters are holding the line, the Black Forest fire northeast of Colorado Springs is being called the most destructive in Colorado history.

Update At 7:35 p.m. ET. Progress Reported

The fire is now 30 percent contained, officials say.

"We had a real good day without wind," says federal incident commander Rich Harvey. "I think the rain had a tremendous impact. So, some things finally turned in our favor."

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Fri June 14, 2013

With Game 4 Win, Heat Even Championship Series Against Spurs

LeBron James of the Miami Heat goes up for a shot against Kawhi Leonard of the San Antonio Spurs during Game 4 of the NBA Finals at the AT&T Center in San Antonio on Thursday.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:26 am

With a 109-93 win, the Miami Heat evened their championship series against the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday night.

As The Miami Herald put it, the game served as a dazzling display for Miami's Big Three:

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Book News: CIA Nominee Catches Grief Over Bookstore Erotica Readings

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Fri June 14, 2013

U.S. Says Syria Crossed 'Red Line'; Now What?

A Syrian female rebel monitors the movement of Syrian government forces in the Sheikh Maqsud district of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo in April.
Dimitar Dilkoff AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 1:34 pm

  • NPR's Deb Amos On Morning Edition
  • NPR's Michele Kelemen On Morning Edition
(This post was last updated at 1:31 p.m. ET.)

On Thursday, the United States revealed that it now has "high confidence" that the Syrian regime had used chemical weapons against rebel forces.

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The Two-Way
7:16 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Lost In 1968 Battle, Marine's Dog Tag Found Again

After a photo of Lanny Martinson's dog tag was placed on Facebook and elsewhere, Marines and veterans helped track him down. Martinson lost the tag in Vietnam in 1968.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:08 pm

Lanny Martinson was a 23-year-old Marine sergeant in Vietnam when he last held his dog tags. In the 45 years since, he thought they were gone forever, lost in the mad rush to save his life after he and other Marines walked into a minefield.

He'll soon be getting one of those dog tags back, after a network of people worked together to find the tag's owner. When they contacted him, Martinson was just at the point of filing papers to request new dog tags, all these years later.

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Says It Has 'High Confidence' Syria Used Chemical Weapons

Syrian rebel fighters hold a position Thursday in the northwestern town of Maaret al-Numan. At least 93,000 people, including more than 6,500 children, have been killed in Syria's civil war.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:19 pm

The White House has "high confidence" that the Syrian regime is using chemical weapons against rebel forces, and the U.S. is prepared to offer military assistance to the opposition, a senior administration official said Thursday.

Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said that an estimated 100 to 150 Syrians have been killed in attacks using sarin gas, although the figure "is likely incomplete."

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The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

4 Exchanges You Should Listen To About NSA Surveillance

FBI Director Robert Mueller is sworn in on on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:12 pm

  • Mueller Responds To Nadler
  • Mueller Explains Importance Of Program
  • Mueller Explains Relation To Fourth Amendment
  • Mueller Responds To Collins

Today was round two on Capitol Hill.

After the Senate Appropriations Committee questioned the director of the National Security Agency, the House Judiciary Committee grilled FBI Director Robert Mueller.

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The Salt
4:49 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Saving Grandma's Strawberry Cake From The Clutches Of Jell-O

Jeremy Jackson wanted to rethink his grandma Mildred's famous Strawberry Cake recipe, which uses boxed cake mix and Jell-O. His updated cupcake version is shown on the right.
Jeremy Jackson for NPR

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:35 pm

Jeremy Jackson's grandma Mildred was famous for her strawberry cake. Legend has it that one of the families in her small Missouri town loved the dessert so much, they "commissioned" her to make it for them once a week.

Jackson is the author of Good Day for A Picnic: Simple Food that Travels Well. He shared two versions of his Strawberry Cake for All Things Considered's Found Recipes series.

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