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The Two-Way
9:00 am
Wed March 6, 2013

198,000 Jobs Added In February, Report Shows; January Growth Revised Upward

The scene at a job fair in New York City on Feb. 28.
Lucas Jackson Reuters /Landov

There were 198,000 jobs added to private employers' payrolls in February, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report — a privately produced snapshot of the employment picture that's sometimes a signal of what the Bureau of Labor Statistics will say when it releases its data from the same month.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Wed March 6, 2013

After Chávez: His 'Revolution' Is Likely To Continue

Supporters of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez gathered late Tuesday at Bolivar Square in Caracas, Venezuela, to mourn him.
David Fernandez EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:29 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Steve Inskeep speaks with journalist Jon Lee Anderson
  • From 'Morning Edition': Juan Forero speaks with Renee Montagne

Venezuelan Vice President Nicolás Maduro "controls the purse strings" and his opponents have been looking weak, NPR's Juan Forero said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Book News: 'Superman' Artist Quits Amid Uproar Over Author's Views On Homosexuality

Orson Scott Card, the Ender's Game author tapped to work on an upcoming issue of DC Comics' "Adventures of Superman," has referred to homosexuality as "deviant behavior."
Mark Dadswell Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:21 am
Wed March 6, 2013

In China, Baby's Brutal Death Raises Questions For Many About Nation's Values

Baby Haobo. For many netizens in China, this pixelated image of the infant who suffered a grisly death is a stark reminder of disturbing changes in the country's values system. The picture has spread quickly across Chinese websites.
Tencent

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 1:08 pm

A tale of two car thefts has transfixed China, sparking a new bout of soul-searching. It's generated far more attention online than the ongoing legislative session in Beijing, despite leaked orders from the local government restricting official coverage.

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The Two-Way
6:40 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Judge Intervenes In Heated Battle Over Alabama's Education Bill

Circuit Court Judge Charles Price hears arguments in in Montgomery, Ala., Tuesday on a bill that provides private school tax credits. The judge halted the bill from being delivered to the governor.
Dave Martin AP

A judge in Alabama has blocked the state's governor from signing a school choice bill, after a lawsuit alleged that lawmakers bypassed state rules when they substantially revised the legislation in committee. The vote to pass the bill last week was marked by confusion, anger, and accusations of "sleaziness" and "hypocrisy," as AL.com reported.

Here was the scene last week, as the bill's backers sought to end debate and hold a vote:

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez Has Died, Vice President Says

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in 2006.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 7:23 am

Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez, has died, Vice President Nicolás Maduro announced in a televised statement.

Chávez died at a military hospital in Caracas at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday. He was 58.

In power since 1999, the former military commander became an icon of socialist policies in Latin America. With his country's oil wealth as backup, he launched fierce and unyielding criticism of the United States and its allies.

The AP reports:

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The Two-Way
5:02 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

At 106, Man Finally Gets An Elusive High School Diploma

Fred Butler has done many things in his 106 years, from serving in two military theaters of World War II to helping raise five children. But he had never gone to high school, or earned a diploma — the result of leaving school after the eighth grade to work full-time in a print shop to help support his family.

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The Two-Way
4:07 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

TSA Will Lift Ban Of Small Knives, Wiffle Ball Bats Aboard Planes

A TSA illustration of knives that will be allowed on planes.
TSA

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 4:47 pm

The TSA is whittling down the list of objects air travelers are forbidden to carry on board and says small pocket knives will soon be allowed on commercial flights.

But thats not all! According to the TSA, travelers will also be able to take on board golf clubs (a maximum of two), hockey sticks, and wiffle ball bats. Yes, wiffle ball bats. Finally!

TSA Administrator John Pistole outlined the changes today at an appearance in New York.

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The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

With Approval Of Committee, Brennan's Nomination Moves To Full Senate

John Brennan, President Obama's nominee to lead the CIA, testified at his confirmation hearing Thursday before the Senate Intelligence Committee.
Alex Wong Getty Images

By a vote of 12 to 3, the Senate Intelligence Committee approved the nomination of John Brennan as the head of the Central Intelligence Agency.

The nomination now goes to the full Senate for their confirmation. Reuters reports that timing of that vote is still unknown.

As we've reported, Brennan's nomination has drawn opposition from Senators who "want to know more about last September's attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya."

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The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Green Jacket Auction Halted After Augusta National Asserts Ownership

Augusta National says it has long maintained ownership of the green jackets it awards the winners of the Masters Tournament. Here, Bubba Watson accepts his jacket after winning last year's event.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

The Masters Tournament is still a month away, but the green jackets that grace the winners' shoulders are already in the news, thanks to a lawsuit over a proposed auction of a former champion's jacket.

On one side is tournament host Augusta National Golf Club, which says the jacket, won by Art Wall Jr. in 1959, was stolen; on the other is Florida doctor Stephen Pyles and Heritage Auctions of Texas, who insist the jacket was obtained legally and can thus be sold to the highest bidder.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
3:27 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Want to Find Aliens? Look For Their Detritus

In this illustration, debris along the outer reaches of a planet-forming disk orbits in the glare of a distant sun.
T. Pyle NASA

From science fiction movies, we all know how it happens. Astronomers working with huge telescopes detect an object at the edge of the solar system. It's coming our way and it's moving fast. Working feverishly, they apply the latest image-enhancement techniques, revealing super-sharp pictures of interstellar garbage.

No, wait. That's not how the movies work.

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The Salt
3:11 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Who Grew Your Pint? How Craft Brews Boost Local Farmers

Throwback Brewery in New Hampshire is one of almost 20 New England breweries using malts from Massachusetts' micro-malt house Vally Malt.
Courtesy of Throwback Brewery

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 5:27 pm

Brent Manning is a maltster on a mission. The co-founder of Riverbend Malt House in Asheville, N.C., wants people to be able to taste local grains in North Carolina's beers, just as vino aficionados can identify the provenance of fine wines.

"In the wine industry ... they will tell you that the No. 1 Syrah grape grows on this hillside over here because it's a bit rockier," Manning explains. "It's that very same connection to the soil and the underlying geology that creates these nuances in flavors."

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Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Infections With 'Nightmare Bacteria' Are On The Rise In U.S. Hospitals

Klebsiella pneumoniae, seen here with an electron microscope, are the most common superbugs causing highly drug-resistant infections in hospitals.
Kwangshin Kim Science Source

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:34 pm

Federal officials warned Tuesday that an especially dangerous group of superbugs has become a significant health problem in hospitals throughout the United States.

These germs, known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, have become much more common in the last decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the risk they pose to health is becoming evident.

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The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

White House Backs Right To Unlock New Cell Phones

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:23 pm

Following the lead of FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, the White House said yesterday that it believed users should be allowed to unlock their cellphones without breaking the law.

The White House made the statement in response to an online petition signed by more than 114,000 people. R. David Edelman wrote:

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