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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

Teacher Evaluation Impasse Costs New York City Hundreds Of Millions

In New York City, the failure to agree on a plan for evaluating its teachers is being widely criticized, especially because it means the city will now miss out on hundreds of millions of dollars in state financing.

At stake was $250 million in state aid, and another $200 million in grants, according to WNYC's Schoolbook education blog.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:45 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Why Do Engineers Put Faces On Their Robots?

Sydney FC and the Melbourne Heart in Sydney." href="/post/why-do-engineers-put-faces-their-robots" class="noexit lightbox">
The face says it all: Yairo Yau grimaces during a December 2012 match between Sydney FC and the Melbourne Heart in Sydney.
Craig Golding Getty Images

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have shown that crabs will avoid a location where they have received electric shocks in the past.

Does this show that crabs feel pain?

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Body Exhumed Of Lottery Winner Who Suffered Cyanide-Related Death

Urooj Khan, with his winning lottery ticket. Not long after this photo was taken, he was dead.
AP

The remains of Urooj Khan, the Chicago man who last July died one day after his $425,000 check from the Illinois lottery was cut, were exhumed today, the Chicago Tribune reports.

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Toyota Settles Wrongful Death Lawsuits Linked With Sudden Acceleration Problems

Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 3:35 pm

Toyota has agreed to settle lawsuits with the relatives of two people killed in one of their vehicles, allegedly after the engine suddenly accelerated. Paul Van Alfen and Charlene Jones Lloyd died near Wendover, Utah in 2010 when their Toyota Camry crashed into a wall.

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Monkey See
10:58 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Globes, Oscars, And Who Are You Calling A Snub?

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The Salt
10:51 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Mixed Pickle: The Sweet And Sour Legacy Of Dutch Trade

Pickles and herring, Amsterdam-style.
albertstraub Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 8:36 am

In Amsterdam, a popular street snack of brined herring comes with chopped onions and a side of sour pickle. The history of Dutch trade, too, is buried under those onions.

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Acid Thrown In Face Of Bolshoi Ballet's Artistic Director; He May Lose Sight

Sergei Filin, artistic director of the Bolshoi ballet, in 2011.
Yuri Kadobnov AFP/Getty Images

A masked assailant threw acid into the face of the Bolshoi ballet's artistic director on Thursday in Moscow in what may have been a "reprisal for his selection of dancers in starring roles at the famed Russian company," The Associated Press reports.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Te'o Spoke Of 'Girlfriend' As If She Existed After He Supposedly Learned Of Hoax

Manti Te'o, pointing skyward during Notre Dame's game against Michigan on Sept. 22. That was the day, he said then, of his girlfriend's funeral service. Now, he says he never met her and they had only an online and telephone relationship.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:53 am

Notre Dame football star Manti Te'o "perpetuated the heartbreaking story" of a girlfriend's death after he supposedly had learned he was the victim of a hoax and that she never existed, The Associated Press writes.

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Krulwich Wonders...
8:39 am
Fri January 18, 2013

No Fists, Gentlemen, Just Necks. The Ali & Frazier Of The Giraffe World

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:18 am

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Fri January 18, 2013

American Confirmed Dead In Algerian Hostage Crisis

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 8:56 pm

(We updated the top of this post at 8:55 ET.)

An American worker has been confirmed dead at the natural gas complex in eastern Algeria where Islamic extremists seized hostages, the U.S. State Department said Friday evening in a statement.

The State Department identified the man as Frederick Buttaccio, a Texas resident, but did not provide additional details on the circumstances.

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The Two-Way
3:38 am
Fri January 18, 2013

As Social Issues Drive Young From Church, Leaders Try To Keep Them

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

On Friday, Morning Edition wraps up its weeklong look at the growing number of people who say they do not identify with a religion. The final conversation in the Losing Our Religion series picks up on a theme made clear throughout the week: Young adults are drifting away from organized religion in unprecedented numbers. In Friday's story, NPR's David Greene talks to two religious leaders about the trend and wonders what they tell young people who are disillusioned with the church.

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Shots - Health News
6:10 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

It's Legal For Some Insurers To Discriminate Based On Genes

Slides containing DNA sit in a bay waiting to be analyzed by a genome sequencing machine.
David Paul Morris Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:48 am

Getting the results of a genetic test can be a bit like opening Pandora's box. You might learn something useful or interesting, or you might learn that you're likely to develop an incurable disease later on in life.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Did This Man Order The Hostage Takings In Algeria?

This image from video provided by the SITE Intel Group made available Thursday Jan. 17, 2013, purports to show militant militia leader Mokhtar Belmokhtar. News reports say he may have been responsible for the Western hostages' being taken at a gas plant in Algeria.
SITE Intel Group AP

Mokhtar Belmokhtar has had a few skirmishes in his day.

The former Algerian soldier went to Afghanistan to join Islamist fighters battling the Soviets in the 1980s. He returned home and rose to prominence among the Islamist rebels who waged a nasty war with the Algerian government in the 1990s.

For the past decade, he's remained an elusive figure. He's believed to have spent most of his time in Algeria's Sahara and has been regarded as one of the top figures in al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, or AQIM.

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The Two-Way
4:24 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

AP Credit Will No Longer Be Accepted At Dartmouth

Advanced Placement exams, which many high school students use to gain course credits when they attend college, will no longer be accepted for credit at Dartmouth College, the Associated Press reports.

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