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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Rosie O'Donnell Had Heart Attack, Uses Verse To Spread News And Message

Rosie O'Donnell in July 2011.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 11:15 am

Rosie O'Donnell has chosen an unusual way to tell her fans that she suffered a heart attack last week:

In verse.

On her blog.

And she's using the experience to urge other women to "listen to the voice inside" and call 911 if they suffer the symptoms she did — which she tried to ignore for a day.

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The Two-Way
8:24 am
Tue August 21, 2012

In Afghanistan: General's Plane Damaged; Afghans Start Spying On Own Troops

An aircraft that had been set to fly Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey out of Afghanistan today was damaged by shrapnel from rockets fired at the Bagram air field north of Kabul from outside its fences.

Two maintenance workers on the ground were slightly wounded, NPR's Tom Bowman reports. Dempsey was not near the aircraft at the time. He later left Afghanistan on another plane.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Diana Nyad Ends Latest Bid To Swim From Cuba To Key West

Diana Nyad in the Florida Straits on Monday.
Christi Barli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 11:21 am

Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad has ended her third recent attempt to swim the 100 miles or so from Cuba to Key West, Florida, her official Twitter page says.

That word followed reports from ABC News' Good Morning America and CNN.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:29 am
Tue August 21, 2012

High School Daze: The Perils of Sacrificing Sleep for Late-Night Studying

It may not be the best strategy to stay up late and cram. A new study finds that when teens don't get the sleep they need, all kinds of things can go poorly.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 9:01 am

High school students with heavy academic course loads often find the demands of homework colliding with the need for adequate sleep.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:28 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Health Law Gives Medicare Fraud Fighters New Weapons

With help from the Affordable Care Act, government fraud investigators will make more use of computer programs to detect Medicare and Medicaid scams.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 9:01 am

Fighting health care fraud in the U.S. can seem like an endless game of Whack-a-Mole. When government fraud squads crack down on one scheme, another pops up close by.

But the fraud squads that look for scams in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs have some new weapons: tools and funding provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Medicare and Medicaid pay out some $750 billion each year to more than 1.5 million doctors, hospitals and medical suppliers. By many estimates, about $65 billion a year is lost to fraud.

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The Salt
3:24 am
Tue August 21, 2012

How A Biofuel Dream Called Jatropha Came Crashing Down

A man harvests fruits of the Jatropha tree in Taabo, Ivory Coast. Jatropha, which is grown in many parts of the world, has fallen from favor as a diesel fuel substitute.
Kambou Sia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:37 am

From Congress to The Colbert Report, people are talking about the Midwestern drought and debating whether it makes sense to convert the country's shrinking corn supplies into ethanol to power our cars.

It's the latest installment of the long-running food vs. fuel battle.

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The Two-Way
7:19 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

JetBlue Fined $90K For Not Telling Passengers They Were Allowed To Deplane

A JetBlue Airways aircraft.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The Department of Transportation said it has fined JetBlue $90,000, after it failed to inform passengers that they could leave a plane that sat at the gate for close to three hours.

DOT said that violated airline protection rules that went into effect in April 2010. The rule says that if passengers can get off the plane, they should be informed that they can do so and they should be given updates every 30 minutes.

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The Two-Way
7:07 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Death Of Handcuffed Man In Police Car Ruled A Suicide

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 6:42 am

A 21-year-old man whose hands were cuffed behind him in the back seat of a police car in Arkansas killed himself with a concealed handgun. That's according to an autopsy report released Monday into the death of Chavis Carter.

Carter died July 28 after being detained during a traffic stop. Police said he had an outstanding arrest warrant – later revealed to be drug-related. The driver and the passenger of the vehicle he was in were allowed to go.

Police searched Carter twice, but found no gun.

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The Two-Way
6:26 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

For First Time, Latinos Represent Largest Minority Group In Colleges

In a new study, The Pew Hispanic Center says that for the first time ever, Hispanics have become the largest minority group in the country's college campuses.

It's a report that marks many firsts for the ethnic group, which has been making great strides in education since 1972.

Among them: For the first time, there were more than 2 million latinos ages 18 to 24 enrolled. They reached a record 16.5 percent of all college enrollment. Hispanics make up a little more than a quarter of 18- to 24-year-olds enrolled in two-year colleges.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:31 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Dr. Seuss On Malaria: 'This is Ann ... She Drinks Blood'

During World War II, Capt. Theodor Geisel — better known as Dr. Seuss — created a small booklet explaining how to prevent mosquito bites.
Theodor Geisel Courtesy of USDA

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 10:34 am

Before he cooked up green eggs or taught us to count colorful fish, Dr. Seuss was a captain in the U.S. Army. And during World War II, the author and illustrator, whose given name was Theodor Geisel, spent a few years creating training films and pamphlets for the troops.

One of Geisel's Army cartoons was a booklet aimed at preventing malaria outbreaks among GIs by urging them to use nets and keep covered up.

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Low Waters Close 11-Mile Stretch Of Mississippi River

A tow pushes a barge past a sandbar on the Mississippi River near the confluence with the Missouri River north of St. Louis., on Friday. Many sandbars normally under water on the two rivers are now exposed as the drought has caused river levels to drop.
Jim Salter AP

An 11-mile stretch of the Mississippi River was closed today because of low waters levels.

The AP reports:

"Coast Guard spokesman Ryan Tippets told The Associated Press on Monday that the stretch of river near Greenville, Miss., has been closed intermittently since Aug. 11, when a vessel ran aground.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:12 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

When We Mistake Our World

Applying Newtonian thinking is wrong when it comes to the evolution of life and culture.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 4:25 pm

We mistake our world.

With an arrogance born in part of science's triumphs since Newton, in part of the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, modernity, we mistake our living, human world.

More importantly, we mistake our humanity and how we might better come to live with one another as our globe, with its dozens of civilizations, rushes together.

Let's start with Newton. More than any other single mind, Newton taught us how to think. I've posted on this before, I know, but it warrants repetition. We remain Newton's children.

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The Two-Way
3:48 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Phyllis Diller, Legendary Comedian, Is Dead

In this May 20, 1966 file photo, comedian Phyllis Diller appears in character in the ABC-TV comedy series "The Pruitts of Southampton."
AP

Phyllis Diller, who was known for her trademark self-deprecating humor and laugh, has died at 95.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

What A Blast! Curiosity Tests Its Laser; Zaps Rock 30 Times

From NASA: A composite image, with "magnified insets," depicting the first laser test by Curiosity.
NASA

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 3:50 pm

Our favorite headline of the day has to be Space.com's "Pew! Pew! Pew! NASA's Curiosity Rover Zaps Mars Rock With Laser."

As the story says:

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