National

It's All Politics
7:33 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

3 Reasons President Obama Is Winning This Immigration Fight

President Obama at a town hall meeting on immigration in Miami Wednesday with journalist Jose Diaz-Balart. The event was hosted by Telemundo and MSNBC.
Pedro Portal AP

As the Republican Congress tried this week to get itself out of the box it put itself in, President Obama was in Miami, aggressively ratcheting up the political pressure on the GOP on the issue underlying the standoff over funding the Department of Homeland Security — immigration. Here are three reasons why the president is winning this fight:

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Cities Project
6:39 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Living Small In The City: With More Singles, Micro-Housing Gets Big

Jay Austin's tiny house in Washington, D.C., has 10-foot ceilings, a loft bed over the bathroom and a galley-style kitchen.
Franklyn Cater NPR

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Back in 2012, something unusual got started in an alleyway in an already tightly developed part of northeast Washington, D.C.

On an 11th-of-an-acre lot next to a cemetery, behind a block of row houses, tiny houses started to go up. And not just one little house in backyard, like you might see in many places. The builders billed this as an urban tiny house community.

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Goats and Soda
4:38 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

How Tents And Fried Chicken Help Stop Childhood Cancers

Physicians Nowiba Mugambi and Erica Palys discuss a patient's X-ray at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. The hospital plans to open a new cancer treatment center in April.
Evelyn Hockstein Courtesy of AMPATH

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:36 pm

Not too many years ago, nearly half of the kids diagnosed with cancer in Guatemala wouldn't come in for treatment. There wasn't much chemotherapy to be had, and parents didn't think treatments worked. Most children with curable cancers died.

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Law
4:35 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Legalized Pot In D.C. A Symbolic Victory For Marijuana Advocates

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:35 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Many Of Oregon's Coastal Schools, Hospitals And Fire Stations At Tsunami Risk

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Found Recipes
4:35 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Don't Be Fooled By The Fishy Ingredients: This Burger Is Delicious

Chef Marcus Samuelsson first fell in love with a version of this burger at a tiny fish shack in Barbados.
Paul Brissman Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Have you ever fallen in love with a sandwich? Maybe one where the mix of ingredients might otherwise say, "No, I am so wrong for you!" And yet ... it's delicious.

That once happened to chef Marcus Samuelsson in Barbados. He has a ritual whenever he travels to a new place — ask the cabdriver, "Where do you eat?" On that trip he ended up at a tiny fish shack called Cuz, named after its owner.

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The Salt
4:26 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Will The Dietary Guidelines Consider The Planet? The Fight Is On

A government-appointed panel concluded in a recent report that Americans should eat less red meat and processed meat. A more plant-focused diet is better for health and the environment, it found.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:40 pm

When it comes to eating well, we should consider the health of our bodies and the planet. This was the recommendation coming from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on Feb. 19.

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Shots - Health News
2:48 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

From Naked Mole Rats To Dog Testicles: A Writer Explores The Longevity Quest

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:42 pm

When journalist Bill Gifford turned 40, his friends gave him a cake shaped as a tombstone with the words, "R.I.P, My Youth." As he reflected on his creeping memory lapses and the weight he'd gained, Gifford got interested in the timeless quest to turn back the aging clock — or at least slow it down.

His latest book, Spring Chicken, explores everything from some wacky pseudo-cures for aging to fascinating research that point to causes of aging at the cellular level.

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Television
2:39 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Battle Creek' Has The Flavor Of A TV Throwback From An Earlier Age

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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The Salt
1:49 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Alaska Farmer Turns Icy Patch Of Tundra Into A Breadbasket

Tim Meyers on his four-acre vegetable farm in southwestern Alaska. Behind him: an endless sea of tundra, and a glimpse of the town of Bethel.
Eugenie Frerichs for NPR

The Alaskan tundra might not seem like much of an agricultural hotspot, but one farmer in the frigid town of Bethel believes he's found America's newest breadbasket.

For the last 10 years, Tim Meyers has been coaxing an enviable quantity of fruits and veggies from just four acres of land. Last year, he produced 50,000 pounds of potatoes, beets, carrots and other vegetables. He sells it at his year-round biweekly market and to local grocery stores.

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It's All Politics
12:38 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

What We're Watching At The Conservative Political Action Conference

Ben Carson talks with media after his CPAC speech.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:48 pm

This week's Conservative Political Action Conference has drawn a huge crowd of activists and politicos, per usual — but it's also a prime spot for 2016 presidential hopefuls. The GOP's potential candidates — former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Sen. Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Gov. Scott Walker, Gov. Bobby Jindal — are rolling on and off the main stage, hoping to fire up the conservative audience. And how well they do with this crowd — an important part of their base — may say a lot about 2016. Here are five things I'll be watching for at CPAC:

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Economy
12:31 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Higher Wages, Lower Prices Give Consumers A Break

A sharp drop in gasoline prices led the consumer price index to fall in January. The CPI posted its first year-over-year drop since 2009.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:02 pm

Economists usually worry about a "wage-price spiral" taking hold. That's when workers are earning more, but losing buying power as prices rise.

For now, at least, something very rare is happening: Paychecks and prices are heading in opposite directions.

"You have a schism that's helpful to consumers," IHS economist Doug Handler said about the recent decline in prices and rise in wages.

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Shots - Health News
11:51 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Doctors Join Forces With Lawyers To Reduce Firearms Deaths

Closing loopholes in background checks for gun purchases would reduce the risk of death and injury, doctors' and attorneys' groups say.
Alexa Miller Getty Images

Each year more than 32,000 people die in the United States as a result of suicides, homicides and accidents with firearms.

For years doctors have tried to reduce the toll by addressing gun injuries and deaths as a public health issue; there's ample evidence that ease of access to is linked to the number of suicides and homicides. But those efforts haven't gained much traction.

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NPR History Dept.
11:26 am
Thu February 26, 2015

How Black Abolitionists Changed A Nation

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:52 pm

This year we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution — abolishing slavery. So it's worth pointing out that the emancipation movement in 19th century America was pushed forward by many different forces: enlightened lawmakers, determined liberators of captive slaves and outspoken abolitionists — including an influential number who were black.

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Shots - Health News
9:10 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Attention, Shoppers: Prices For 70 Health Care Procedures Now Online!

Shopping for an MRI scan? Guroo.org, won't yet show you what your local hospital or radiologist charges, but it will reveal the average cost of the test in your area.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:38 am

Buying health care in America is like shopping blindfolded at Macy's and getting the bill months after you leave the store, Princeton economist Uwe Reinhardt likes to say.

But an online tool that went live Wednesday is supposed to help change that, giving patients in most parts of the country a small peek at the prices of medical tests and procedures before they open their wallets.

Got a sore knee? Having a baby? Need a primary-care doctor? Shopping for an MRI scan?

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Race
7:11 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Ferguson Lawyer To Represent Family Of Latino Man Shot 17 Times By Police

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:38 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
5:18 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Dori Maynard, Journalism Diversity Advocate, Dies At 56

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
5:16 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Fisherman In Missing Fish Case

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
5:16 am
Thu February 26, 2015

West Coast Ports Dispute Caused Collateral Damage, Labor Secretary Says

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:09 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Planned Netanyahu Speech To Congress Continues To Cause Political Uproar

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:09 am
Thu February 26, 2015

U.S. Steps Up Commitment To Fight Malaria

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The White House is stepping up its commitment to fighting a disease that still kills roughly 600,000 people around the world each year. The Obama administration has announced a six-year extension of a program to fight malaria. NPR's Jason Beaubien has more.

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NPR Story
5:09 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Obama Ups Pressure On GOP Over Homeland Security Funding

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:47 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Gov. Scott Walker Goes Head-To-Head With Labor Over Right-To-Work

Hundreds of union members rally outside the Capitol in Madison on Tuesday to oppose a Republican-led measure that would make Wisconsin a right-to-work state.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:13 pm

Wisconsin is set to become the nation's 25th "right to work" state. Republicans in the state Legislature are fast-tracking a bill to Gov. Scott Walker, who is a potential 2016 presidential candidate.

The state Senate passed a right-to-work bill late Wednesday, and the State Assembly could pass it next week.

The measure aims to weaken private sector unions by letting workers opt out of mandatory dues. Wisconsin Republicans appear to be following an anti-union playbook that's been circling the Midwest.

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News
3:45 am
Thu February 26, 2015

In Hollywood, MLK Delivered A Lesser-Known Speech That Resonates Today

Rabbi Max Nussbaum (left) and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Los Angeles.
Temple Israel of Hollywood

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:40 am

Shortly after winning the Nobel Peace Prize and coming back from Selma, Ala., where residents were protesting discrimination and repeated police brutality, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a lesser-known speech to a full house at the Temple Israel of Hollywood in Los Angeles in 1965.

Formally dressed in his dark minister's robes, he told the 1,400 people assembled how much their support meant to those in the thick of the struggle.

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It's All Politics
3:44 am
Thu February 26, 2015

On Net Neutrality, Republicans Pitch Oversight Rather Than Regulation

Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's "net neutrality" plan.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:37 am

The Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote Thursday morning to put more stringent regulations on Internet providers.

Backers, including many tech firms and the Obama administration, say the net neutrality rules will ensure equal access to the net for content providers. But Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's plan.

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U.S.
8:46 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Wisconsin Governor To Sign Right-To-Work Bill Amid Protests

State Sen. Scott Fitzgerald is the lead author of the right-to-work bill, which he says is a step towards modernizing Wisconsin's labor laws.
Shawn Johnson WPR

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 11:13 pm

Update 11:10 p.m.

As expected the state Senate passed the right-to-work bill late Wednesday, 17-15, after eight hours of debate, Wisconsin Public Radio's Erik Lorenzsonn reports.

Most of the protesters from earlier in the day had left the Capitol by the time of the bill's passage. Nevertheless, the few that remained chanted "Shame!" at lawmakers as they exited the Senate chambers, while some began singing protest songs in the Capitol rotunda.

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All Tech Considered
6:28 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

What Net Neutrality Rules Could Mean For Your Wireless Carrier

T-Mobile CEO John Legere pitches a plan that allows unlimited music streaming without additional data charges. Some net neutrality proponents want the FCC to limit plans like these; the commission says it will review them on a case-by-case basis.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:37 am

After a decade of debate, the federal government is poised to change how it regulates Internet access, to make it more like telephone service and other public utilities.

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Shots - Health News
5:37 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Infections With Dangerous Gut Microbe Still On The Rise

An overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria can inflame the colon with a life-threatening infection.
Dr. David Phillips Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:34 pm

A potentially life-threatening gastrointestinal infection is more common than previously estimated, federal health officials reported Wednesday.

The infection, caused by a bacterium known as Clostridium difficile, or C-diff, causes nearly 500,000 illnesses in the United States each year and kills about 29,000, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Africa
4:58 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Terrorism Fears Complicate Money Transfers For Somali-Americans

Customers wait to collect money at the Juba Express money transfer company in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Feb. 12.
Mohamed Abdiwahab AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 8:46 pm

Regulations intended to block money from getting into the hands of terrorist groups has led the last bank that handles most money transfers from the United States to Somalia to pull out of the business.

Somali refugees in the U.S. say their families back home need the money they send each month to survive, and they're counting on lawmakers and Obama administration officials, who are meeting in Washington on Thursday, to try to find a solution.

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Code Switch
4:33 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

When Tech Workers Arrive On Visa, What About Their Spouses?

Upasana Kone's husband works at Microsoft on an H-1B tech visa, but her spouse visa does not include a work permit. The Obama administration has announced a possible rule change to allow some spouses to get a job.
Upasana Kone

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:51 am

This week, spouses of high-tech foreign workers got some good news: the federal government will begin offering some work permits. A lot of tech companies in the U.S. hire foreign workers who come here on H-1B visas, but their spouses — mostly wives — have long pointed to a major drawback. They haven't been allowed to work.

Now, things are changing. On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced it will start taking applications for work permits in May. It's expected that up to 180,000 spouses would initially qualify, then around 50,000 more each year after.

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