Miami already enjoys a vibrant street art scene, but now a new arts district is emerging. The industrial city of Hialeah is becoming an affordable alternative for local artists, who are changing the area's reputation.

Colorful street art brightens the otherwise drab warehouses, where Cuban and Haitian immigrants labor inside binding books, making furniture and sewing clothes. The murals depict flamingoes, a fruit vendor, a girl celebrating her quinceañera.

Updated at 11:08 a.m. ET

Pope Francis arrived in Philadelphia today, where his last two days in the United States will be spent visiting ordinary Catholics and promoting the issue of religious freedom.

The pontiff celebrated Mass in the city at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, the largest brownstone structure in Philadelphia and the largest Catholic church in Pennsylvania.

Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who went to jail after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, was honored Friday at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C. She was presented, to a standing ovation, the "Cost of Discipleship" Award by the conservative Family Research Council, which sponsored the summit.

"I am only one, but we are many," she said tearfully as she accepted the award. We spoke to some of Davis' supporters (along with one attendee who doesn't agree with her actions). Hear their voices below:

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

A children's television program that ran for only five seasons in the U.S. 20 years ago has gone on to enthrall kids around the world in reruns. The show was Beakman's World and its star was a wacky pseudo-scientist in a neon green lab coat and a Don King wig. The show is still beloved in Latin America, where the performance artist who played Beakman tours a stage version of the show to audiences of thousands.

The U.S. is in a frenzy over Pope Francis. And with the pontiff visiting Philadelphia on Saturday, vendors there are ready with commemorative memorabilia – including, as we've reported, a toaster that burns the pontiff's image onto bread.

A strong showing during the Sept. 16 debate has put Carly Fiorina at the top of a crowded field of Republican presidential candidates. But in the corporate world, another debate remains: Fiorina's business record.

Donald Trump says as a businesswoman, Fiorina would be unqualified to lead one of his companies.

"The head of the Yale business school, Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, wrote a paper recently (calling it), 'one of the worst tenures for CEOs that he has ever seen,'" Trump says.

There's getting a little choked up. There's shedding a few tears. There's full-on crying. And then, there's John Boehner, American politics' crier-in-chief.

This week, (soon to be former) Speaker of the House Boehner's tear ducts stole the show yet again, definitely upstaging the Pope's little black Fiat and newly-named baby panda Bei Bei to become our #MemeOfTheWeek.

So, what happened?

The ad begins: "A better network as explained by backup quarterback Luke McCown."

Turned off by a slightly smelly fillet of halibut? Don't think that grilled salmon will be any good tomorrow?

Such mealtime decisions may seem innocent enough, but when they're made by people all over the country, they add up to a staggering amount of waste. Nearly half the U.S. seafood supply winds up uneaten, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

From 2009 to 2013, 2.3 billion pounds of seafood on average in the U.S. was wasted annually. That's 208 billion grams of protein a year that no one got to eat.

Updated 6:25 p.m. ET

Friday the State Department revealed two new, unrelated developments related to Hilary Clinton's private email server.

First, the State Department announced that the Department of Defense uncovered a previously undisclosed email chain between former Secretary of State Clinton and retired Gen. David Petraeus about personal matters. NPR's Tamara Keith reports that the chain starts before she became secretary of state and continues into the early days of her time in office.

Pope Francis' second day in New York continues with a visit to Our Lady Queen of Angels School in East Harlem, followed by a motorcade ride through central park at 5 p.m. Afterwards, he will celebrate a mass at 6 p.m. in Madison Square Garden.

Earlier in the day, the pontiff addressed the United Nations General Assembly, advising the assembled global leaders to put humanity before partisan interests.

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NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the#NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From NPR social media editor Lori Todd:

Mark this time in the history books: 1:09 p.m. That's the moment on Friday when Pope Francis' influence came through in two simultaneous news conferences, held by two men who haven't always seen eye to eye.

At one end of Pennsylvania Avenue, House Speaker John Boehner was reflecting on his decision to resign.

Pope Francis, addressing the U.N. General Assembly today, urged international cooperation not only to solve humanity's largest problems but to save humanity itself.

Quoting a speech to the U.N. by his predecessor Pope Paul VI in 1965, Francis said of the world today: "The real danger comes from man...."

He stressed that humans have a moral duty to protect the earth, saying that it is the creation of God and humans don't have the authority to abuse or destroy it.

When a village doesn't have latrines, several problems predictably follow.

Diseases like cholera and infectious diarrhea are rampant, thanks to the flies, water and livestock that spread bacteria from uncovered feces to humans.

Another, less publicized problem has to do with women and their periods. Women are often left with nowhere to go to deal with the private — and, for young teenagers, potentially embarrassing — matter of their monthly bleed.

Children of anxious parents are more at risk of developing an anxiety disorder. But there's welcome news for those anxious parents: that trajectory toward anxiety isn't set in stone.

Therapy and a change in parenting styles might be able to prevent kids from developing anxiety disorders, according to research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry Friday.

We may eat a lot of food additives, but most consumers know very little about them. These often misunderstood substances go by unwieldy names like "diacetyl" or "azodicarbonamide." They are in everything from salad dressings to Twinkies. But how many of us actually know what they look like or, more important, what they're doing in our food?

The baby giant panda at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C., was given a name.

The little guy had some VIP help. The name was chosen by first lady Michelle Obama and China's first lady, Madame Peng Liyuan.

Here's the pool report from the ceremony:

"The panda born on August 22 here to Mei Xiang has a name! It's Bei Bei. It was chosen by FLOTUS and Ms. Peng and they revealed it in English and Chinese by unrolling scrolls tied by ribbons with help of two school kids."

It's pronounced "Bay-Bay."

On this week's show, two of us (Bob Mondello and I) are freshly back from the Toronto International Film Festival, so we have news on some of what we saw and what you can expect to see in the near weeks and the less near months to come. Is The Martian spacey enough? Can Tom Hiddleston really play Hank Williams? And whither artsy 3D?

All these questions and lots more are about to be answered. Then in our second segment, we'll return to a favorite regular feature: the fall TV pool, where we gamble on which new shows actually have a chance to win hearts and minds.

Maybe you've become inured to all the superlatives that get attached to sky-watching events. But the one on Sunday really is worth a look — it's the first total eclipse that's also a supermoon and a blood moon in more than three decades.

You may never have offered to swear something "on a stack of Bibles," but you probably recognize that folksy phrase as a variation on saying, "Honest to God."

And when you hear: "Raise your right hand, do you solemnly swear to tell the truth, the whole truth...," you may very well have your left hand on a Bible.

While the Republicans running for president are united in their desire to repeal the federal health law, Democrat Hillary Clinton is fashioning her own health care agenda to tackle out-of-pocket costs.

But would her proposals solve the problem?

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He arrived in Manhattan, though, last night. And at St. Patrick's Cathedral, he received a warm and lively welcome. Fred Mogul from member station WNYC was there.

Some Western parents worry whether vaccines for their kids are spaced too closely together. The last Republican presidential debate fueled anxiety over the issue.

Once again, health experts have been rushing in to reassure parents that the schedule for vaccinating children is not only safe but medically necessary.

It was 60 years ago this week that an all-white jury acquitted two white men in the murder of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy visiting Mississippi from Chicago.

The case shocked the nation — drawing attention to the brutal treatment of African-Americans in the Deep South, and the failure of the justice system. The men later confessed to killing Till for whistling at a white woman.

The Drug Enforcement Administration is partnering with police and fire departments and pharmacies Saturday to relaunch its drug take-back program, which encourages people to rummage through their homes and hand over unused prescriptions.

"Lots and lots of folks have prescription pills that have either expired or they no longer need, and in the wrong hands, those are poison," acting DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg told NPR in an interview. "So the purpose of the program is to get those out of medicine cabinets. We can dispose of them anonymously and safely."