National

Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

A Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented

Julissa Arce's tourist visa expired when she was 14. She excelled in high school, college and at Goldman Sachs for years before she finally became a U.S. citizen.
Courtesy Julissa Arce

Julissa Arce was born in Mexico, and came to the United States on a tourist visa when she was 11. It expired a few years later — but Arce didn't leave. Instead, she excelled in high school and college, then secured a job at Goldman Sachs. Her ascent was dramatic: she rose quickly from analyst to associate to vice president.

But Arce was scared to go to work every day, worried that her undocumented status would be uncovered and she'd be escorted out.

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Code Switch
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

How Pittsburgh's Freedom House Pioneered Paramedic Treatment

Freedom House paramedics, who first were deployed in the 1960s, provided a crucial service for Pittsburgh residents. The program became a national model for emergency medical transport and care.
Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh

In the 1960s, Pittsburgh, like most cities, was segregated by race. But people of all colors suffered from lack of ambulance care. Police were the ones who responded to medical emergency calls.

"Back in those days, you had to hope and pray you had nothing serious," recalls filmmaker and Hollywood paramedic Gene Starzenski, who grew up in Pittsburgh. "Because basically, the only thing they did was pick you up and threw you in the back like a sack of potatoes, and they took off for the hospital. They didn't even sit in the back with you."

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Goats and Soda
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

The Brother Went To Fight Ebola. So Did His Sister. Mom Was 'A Wreck'

How do siblings get around the "no touching" rule during the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone? Alex and Jen Tran grabbed a rare hug when they were geared up for training.
Courtesy of Alex Tran

When Alex Tran went off to Sierra Leone to work as an epidemiologist, his parents were worried. His mom was "a wreck," according to his sister Jen who followed him into the Ebola hot zone a few weeks later.

Last fall as the Ebola outbreak raged in West Africa, Alex, 28, was working at USAID. Jen, who's a registered nurse, was deployed with the U.S. Navy on a ship in the Arabian Gulf. They both were itching to get to the front lines of the epidemic to help.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

6 In 10 Young Republicans Favor Legal Marijuana, Survey Says

A user prepares to roll a marijuana cigarette on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes in the District of Colombia on Thursday.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 1:38 pm

Nearly two-thirds of Millennials who identify as Republican support legalizing marijuana, while almost half of older GOP Gen-Xers do, according to a recently released Pew survey that could be an indicator of where the debate is heading.

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Monkey See
8:57 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Will Forte Is 'The Last Man On Earth'

In the year 2020, a deadly virus has swept Earth. Phil Miller (Will Forte) is the only survivor.
Jordin Althaus FOX

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 10:41 am

Even were it not a strong show out of the gate, you'd have to give Fox's new comedy The Last Man On Earth, premiering Sunday night, at least this much: they know how to save on hiring extras.

Will Forte, a flexible and talented performer who's been looking for just the right thing since he left Saturday Night Live, did what a lot of people do now when they aren't getting the right opportunities: he wrote himself a television show.

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Strange News
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Watermelon Wedge Issue Ripens In Oklahoma

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

In Fourth Year Of Drought, Many Calif. Farms Won't Get Federal Water

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Who Fails To Pay Child Support? Moms, At A Higher Rate Than Dads

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

After Delays, Jury Selection To Wrap Up In Boston Bombing Trial

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

'The Last Man': An Odd Premise, Says Its Creator, But Oddly Relatable

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pop Culture
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Actor And Director Finds His Roots In Travel Writing

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Health
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Coming To Terms With The Pressure Of Weight

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
7:06 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Mr. Spock, Mixed-Race Pioneer

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock. The character's mixed Vulcan and human heritage set him apart from the rest of the Star Trek crew.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 3:17 pm

At a time when the mere sight of Petula Clark touching Harry Belafonte's arm held the potential to upset delicate sensibilities, the half-human, half-Vulcan character Mr. Spock embodied an identity rarely acknowledged, much less seen, on television: a mixed-race person.

Sure, the mixing of races was allegorical in Spock's case, as was the brilliantly subversive mode for social commentary on Star Trek. But that doesn't mean it didn't resonate.

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Shots - Health News
7:03 am
Sun March 1, 2015

How A Group Of Lung Cancer Survivors Got Doctors To Listen

Chris Newman, seen at her home in Los Molinos, Calif., calls the change she helped get made to lung cancer treatment guidelines a "small, but very important victory."
Courtesy of Chris Newman

A group of lung cancer survivors was chatting online last May about what they thought was a big problem: Influential treatment guidelines published by a consortium of prominent cancer centers didn't reflect an option that several people thought had saved their lives. They wanted to change that.

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Pop Culture
7:03 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Mr. Spock And The Consolations Of Solitude

Spock was famously emotionless, but that didn't stop him from forming intense friendships with his shipmates, particularly Captain James T. Kirk.
NBCU Photo Bank

When I heard about the sad demise of Leonard Nimoy, I felt — and I'm certain I'm not alone here — a sense of loss and sadness entirely disproportionate to the death of someone I'd never met. Then again, what he meant to me in my youth — and again, I'm certain I'm not alone here — was also, perhaps, disproportionately significant.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sun March 1, 2015

The Art Of Syrian Refugees Sends A Message. Is Anyone Listening?

In "Exile From One's Country," Mohammed Al-Amari captures the pain of a Syrian girl.
Courtesy of Mohammed Al Amari

When Syrian artist Mohammed Al-Amari, 27, fled the country's civil war last winter he couldn't carry much. Just some clothes, and little else, he says. But he did manage to bring some "colors" with him — watercolors, pastels and even a few of his paintings.

Al-Amari and his wife didn't want to leave their home in Daraa province in southwestern Syria. They stayed for the first three years of the war, but eventually moved from their village to another one that was further from the conflict.

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Animals
6:13 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

To Curb Bear Population, Florida Reinstates Hunting Season

This black bear was spotted atop a tree in Tampa, Fla., on May 17, 2013. The bear population has been on the rise, so state wildlife officials are calling for a bear hunting season.
Skip O'Rourke MCT /Landov

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

For the first time in two decades, Florida officials have scheduled a bear hunting season. It's a response to a rise in bear attacks — but it has some environmentalists upset.

Experts say there's plenty of room for humans and black bears to co-exist, but the smell of food is pulling the animals out of the woods and into neighborhoods.

If you want to understand the situation, take a trip to Franklin County, in the pandhandle. A few months ago, a bear attacked a teenager there while she walked her dog near a convenience store.

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Code Switch
5:45 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Diversity Sells — But Hollywood Remains Overwhelmingly White, Male

Gina Rodriguez stars alongside Justin Baldoni in The CW's Jane the Virgin.
Danny Feld The CW

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

If you want an accurate picture of ethnic and gender diversity in the United States, don't look to Hollywood.

That's the conclusion of the "2015 Hollywood Diversity Report" conducted by the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA.

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Remembrances
5:00 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Mr. Spock Was A Biracial Role Model Of Notable Cool

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
4:57 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

One Man's Race To Outrun Alzheimer's

Greg O'Brien gathers his thoughts before a run in 2013. "Running is essential," he says.
Michael Strong Living With Alzheimers

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:21 pm

This is the third in NPR's series "Inside Alzheimer's," about the experience of living with the illness. In parts one and two, Greg O'Brien talked about what it was like to get the diagnosis of Alzheimer's, and how he thinks about the future.

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It's All Politics
3:28 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

How Conservatives Are Readying Their 'Grassroots Army' For 2016

Dalia Wrochesinsky (left) and Robin Saidenberg check their phones during the Conservative Political Action Conference on Thursday.
Emily Jan NPR

This week's Conservative Political Action Conference, CPAC, brought all the expected on and off the main stage in Washington D.C. — speeches by presidential hopefuls, debates and the annual straw poll. But there was one big addition: hundreds attended the conference's first-ever Activism Boot Camp, which trained attendees in the best practices of do-it-yourself campaigning.

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Goats and Soda
12:29 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

While New England Gets Snow, West Africa Gets Sand

The Harmattan haze can become so dense in Dakar, Senegal, it dims the sun and grounds flights.
Joe Penney Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 2:11 pm

Would you kindly bear with me a little while I have a good old moan, please? I'm feeling rather wretched. No, not because I've finally kicked a lingering lurgy that turned out to be bronchitis and stole my voice. But because one of the reasons I blame for the illness is back: the Harmattan.

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Code Switch
10:03 am
Sat February 28, 2015

A 'Show Boat' With An Asian-American Cast Hits The Rocks

A heads-up to our readers: This post quotes a racial slur.

When actress Erin Quill saw a casting notice earlier this month for a Show Boat musical revival with a completely Asian-American cast, she raised an eyebrow.

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Animals
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Researchers Examine The Ways Of Southern Coyotes

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Copyright 2015 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.gpb.org/.

Transcript

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Politics
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Despite Big Advantages, Emanuel Forced To Face Chicago Runoff

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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History
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Not So Fast, Jamestown: St. Augustine Was Here First

Park Ranger Mike Evans at the Castillo de San Marcos says the Spanish were roping cattle and pruning their citrus groves in St. Augustine before the British even set sail for Jamestown.
Peter Haden NPR

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Clyde and Corrita Warner came to St. Augustine on vacation from Louisville, Ky. They know their history.

"Well, I knew that this started before the pilgrims landed and before Jamestown," says Corrita. "You know, this area was first."

St. Augustine treasures being the first — and oldest — city in the United States. So when the area around Jamestown, Va., adopted the title "America's First Region" a while back, the gloves came off.

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Remembrances
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Nimoy Is Gone, But Mr. Spock WIll Live Forever

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Television
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Ex-'Weekend Edition' Producer Tight-Lipped On Her 'Jeopardy!' Appearance

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Science
4:43 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains.
Greg Allen NPR

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

In Florida, archaeologists are investigating a site that a century ago sparked a scientific controversy. Today, it's just a strip of land near an airport.

But in 1915, it was a spot that became world-famous because of the work of Elias Sellards, Florida's state geologist. Sellards led a scientific excavation of the site, where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized animal bones and then, human remains.

Andy Hemmings of Mercyhurst University is the lead archaeologist on a project that has picked up where Sellards left off a century ago.

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Monkey See
4:33 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Leonard Nimoy's Mr. Spock Taught Us Acceptance Is Highly Logical

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock in the Star Trek episode, "Plato's Stepchildren" in 1968.
CBS Photo Archive via Getty Images

For this Star Trek fan, Leonard Nimoy was more than the guy who played one of the most popular characters in the most popular science fiction franchise on American TV.

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