National

The Salt
2:02 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Fast-Food Scandal Revives China's Food Safety Anxieties

An "Out of Stock" sticker on a menu picture of chicken nuggets at a McDonald's store in Hong Kong on July 25, 2014. A U.S. company that supplies meat to some fast food chains in China has pulled all its products, some of which were chicken nuggets sold in Hong Kong, made by a Chinese subsidiary.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 2:27 pm

A U.S. company that supplies meat to some of the world's largest fast food chains in China has pulled all its products made by a Chinese subsidiary, after reports that it was selling expired products.

The food safety scandal that erupted in China in the last week has also spread overseas, affecting chain restaurants in Japan and Hong Kong and prompted calls for tighter food safety regulation in China.

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Shots - Health News
12:41 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

With Men's Y Chromosome, Size Really May Not Matter

The human Y chromosome, left, holds the code for "maleness;" that's the X on the right.
Andrew Syred/Science Source

Basic biology has it that girls are girls because they have two X chromosomes — the things inside cells that carry our genes. Boys are boys because they have one X and one Y. Recently, though, there's been a lot of debate in scientific circles about the fate of that Y chromosome — the genetic basis of maleness.

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Money Coach
12:22 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

In Times Of Transition, Get Practical About Your Finances

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
12:22 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

NPR's New CEO Hopes To Improve Diversity At The Network

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Krulwich Wonders...
12:19 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Where The Birds Are Is Not Where You'd Think

Robert Krulwich/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 2:37 pm

This is a trick question. Where would you expect to find the greatest variety of birds?

Downtown, in a city?

Or far, far from downtown — in the fields, forests, mountains, where people are scarce?

Or in the suburbs? In backyards, lawns, parking lots and playing fields?

Not the city, right?

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The Two-Way
7:46 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Lawmakers Reach Deal Intended To Fix VA System In Crisis

House Veterans' Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, a Republican from Florida.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 10:14 am

Lawmakers in Washington, D.C., have reached a deal to overhaul the embattled Department of Veterans Affairs, multiple news organizations are reporting.

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Shots - Health News
5:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

People Who Feel They Have A Purpose In Life Live Longer

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 10:40 am

We know that happiness and social connection can have positive benefits on health. Now research suggests that having a sense of purpose or direction in life may also be beneficial.

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Shots - Health News
5:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Why We Think Ignorance Is Bliss, Even When It Hurts Our Health

Lucinda Schreiber for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 10:40 am

Medical tests are rarely a pleasant experience, especially if you're worried that something could be seriously wrong. That's true even though we know that regular screenings and tests often help doctors catch issues early.

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Shots - Health News
5:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care

Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the New York City borough of the Bronx.
Natalie Fertig WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 1:02 pm

Standing outside her sixth-floor apartment in the Bronx, Lissette Encarnacion says she sometimes forgets the place belongs to her.

"I'm thinking I'm at somebody else's [house]," she says. "I'm ringing my own doorbell."

Encarnacion used to have a career in banking, and lived in a real home with her son and husband. Then one night everything changed, she says, when her husband came home drunk and angry, and threw her off a balcony.

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Around the Nation
5:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Handmade Signs From Homeless People Lead To Art, Understanding

Artist Willie Baronet has been collecting signs from the homeless since 1993.
Tanya Conovaloff

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:52 pm

Artist Willie Baronet is on a 24-city, 31-day trek from Seattle, Wash. to New York City looking for supplies.

He's been buying handmade signs from homeless people for an art project called We Are All Homeless. Those signs are little more than a peripheral blur for many people. Baronet wants us to slow down, read them and understand.

"It really started because of my discomfort, my guilt, the way I felt, whenever I encountered a homeless person on the corner," he tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

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The Two-Way
10:45 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Birth Of 100-Millionth Person In Philippines Greeted With Joy, Concern

Filipino Clemente Sentino Jr (L), 45 and Dailin Cabigayan (R), 27 holds their 6 lbs newborn baby girl marking the "100 million population of the Philippines."
Ritchie B. Tongo EPA/Landov

The Philippines on Sunday welcomed its 100-millionth citizen — a baby girl named Chonalyn who was born at a hospital in the capital, Manila.

Juan Antonio Perez III, executive director of the Commission on Population, announced the official milestone after the birth at Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital, which has one of the busiest maternity wards in the world. The 6-pound Chonalyn arrived shortly after midnight Manila time.

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Science
10:33 am
Sun July 27, 2014

How Our Story About A Child's Science Experiment Sparked Controversy

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 10:52 am

A story that ran last Sunday on All Things Considered about a sixth-grader's science fair project has elicited not just criticism but controversy.

Since the student's project built on the work of scientists, she's been accused this week of being a "plagiarist" who "ripped off" earlier work.

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U.S.
7:40 am
Sun July 27, 2014

A Growing Movement To Spread Faith, Love — And Clean Laundry

Laundry Love gatherings may be the only time some people are able to wash their clothes, says volunteer Ken Kawamura.
Lisa Napoli NPR

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 11:26 am

It's 7 p.m. on a weeknight at a strip mall in Huntington Beach, Calif., and people have been lined up for hours outside a laundromat here. They've been waiting for a chance to do their wash for free. As they file in, volunteers direct them to the machines and help them to supplies.

This is "Laundry Love" at work — a ministry that raises money to pay for detergent, dryer sheets and quarters for machines.

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Monkey See
7:26 am
Sun July 27, 2014

At 75, Batman Still Seeks Justice, Not Revenge

"What Batman provides, what all superheroes provide is this notion that good will triumph over evil," says author Glen Weldon. "That evil will have its day, but there will be somebody up there who will keep trying, who will keep looking out for us. ... He's catharsis in a cape." Above, Adam West, as Batman, makes a road safety film with child actors in Kensington, London in the late 1960s.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 7:24 pm

It's been 75 years since Batman first swooped onto the scene in 1939. Glen Weldon, author of The Caped Crusade, says it's important to note that for the last three quarters of a century, Batman has been seeking justice, not revenge.

"Once his parents are killed he doesn't seek revenge," Weldon tells NPR's Arun Rath. "That's what distinguishes a superhero from an action movie hero. He doesn't go out for revenge. It's not a vendetta, it's a crusade. He represents the idea of: 'This thing that happened to me? Never again.' "

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All Tech Considered
7:59 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

For Rare Languages, Social Media Provide New Hope

An Aymara woman prepares to take part in a pageant in La Paz, Bolivia, in 2013. Jaqi-Aru, a community of volunteers is working on translating the Facebook interface in the indigenous language of Aymara.
Juan Karita AP

At a time when social media users, for no particularly good reason, are trading in fully formed words for abbreviations ("defs" instead of "definitely"), it may seem that some languages are under threat of deterioration — literally.

But social media may actually be beneficial for languages.

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