National

Politics
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Controversy Continues Over Indiana's Religious Freedom Restoration Act

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

To Catch Up On Unsolved Murders, Detroit Detectives Mine Cold Cases

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:38 pm

Criminologists say the country's poor homicide clearance rate could be improved if police departments put more effort into solving murders. To reduce the backlog in Detroit, homicide detectives are returning to old cases that might be solved with new techniques.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Jon Stewart's Replacement Is Unlikely Choice For 'The Daily Show'

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Health
5:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

GNC Announces New Policy After Facing Scrutiny Over Mislabeled Products

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:38 pm

After a probe by the New York Attorney General's office, GNC has announced major new testing and quality control procedures. The dietary supplement retailer recently faced allegations of mislabeling its products.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
3:41 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Our Food-Safety System Is A Patchwork With Big Holes, Critics Say

Walking through the warehouse of food processor Heartland Gourmet in Lincoln, Neb., shows how complicated the food safety system can be. Pallets are stacked with sacks of potato flour, and the smell of fresh-baked apple-cinnamon muffins floats in the air.

Heartland Gourmet makes a wide range of foods — from muffins and organic baking mixes to pizzas and burritos. That means business manager Mark Zink has to answer to both of the main U.S. food safety regulators, the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Judy Woodruff Recalls Assassination Attempt On President Reagan

A Secret Service agent brandishes a submachine gun while agents and police subdue a gunman who shot President Reagan, his press secretary, a policeman and a Secret Service agent in Washington on March 30, 1981.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:08 pm

Thirty-four years ago today, John Hinckley Jr. tried to kill President Reagan.

Reagan was shot in the chest but made a full recovery. Three others, including press secretary James Brady, were wounded.

Veteran journalist Judy Woodruff, now with PBS Newshour, was then a reporter with NBC News. She tweeted her recollection of the events of the day:

Shots - Health News
3:08 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Why Are More Baby Boys Born Than Girls?

There's a widely held assumption that a slight imbalance in male births has its start at the very moment of conception. But researchers say factors later in pregnancy are more likely to explain the phenomenon.
CNRI Science Source

Scientists have found some unexpected clues that could help explain why 51 percent of the babies born in the United States are male.

It's been a mystery why that ratio isn't 50:50, since that's what basic biology would predict. But scientists have noticed a tilted sex ratio at birth since the 17th century.

The widely held assumption is that this imbalance starts at the very moment of conception — that more males are conceived than females.

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The Salt
2:42 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Grocery Stores Are Losing You. Here's How They Plan To Win You Back

A little booze can't hurt: The Hy-Vee grocery chain has added a Market Grille to several of its locations in the Midwest and Great Plains. You can order drinks and dinner before or after you do your grocery shopping.
Courtesy of Hy-Vee Market Grille

If pushing a cart up and down the lengthy aisles of your neighborhood supermarket — past dozens of brands of packaged cereal and crackers lit by fluorescent lights — feels overwhelming and soul-sucking, you're not alone.

But there's some good news: The days of shopping this way may be numbered.

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Shots - Health News
12:23 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Doctors With Cancer Push California To Allow Aid In Dying

Dan Swangard, a 48-year-old physician from San Francisco, was diagnosed in 2013 with a rare form of metastatic cancer.
Anna Gorman/KHN

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 2:55 pm

Dan Swangard knows what death looks like.

As a physician, he has seen patients die in hospitals, hooked to morphine drips and overcome with anxiety. He has watched death drag on for weeks or months as terrified relatives stand by helplessly.

Recently, however, his thoughts about how seriously ill people die have become personal. Swangard was diagnosed in 2013 with a rare form of metastatic cancer.

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Amid Criticism, Indiana's Republicans To Revisit Religious Freedom Law

Indiana Senate President Pro Tem David Long (left) and House Speaker Brian C. Bosma, both Republicans, discuss their plans for clarifying the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act during a news conference today at the Statehouse in Indianapolis.
Michael Conroy AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 11:43 am

Republican leaders in Indiana say they will work to ensure the state's controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act does not allow discrimination against gays and lesbians.

"This law does not discriminate, and it will not be allowed to do so," Indiana Senate President Pro Tem David Long said at a news conference with state House Speaker Brian Bosma.

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Goats and Soda
11:28 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Bill Gates Tells The World: Get Ready For The Next Epidemic

Health workers suit up for Ebola duty in Monrovia, Liberia.
John W. Poole/NPR

"An epidemic is one of the few catastrophes that could set the world back drastically in the next few decades," Bill Gates warns in a essay he wrote for the March 18 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine.

In the article, entitled "The Next Epidemic — Lessons From Ebola" — he says that the Ebola epidemic is a "wake-up call."

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Monkey See
10:31 am
Mon March 30, 2015

5 Thoughts On Trevor Noah Taking Over 'The Daily Show'

Seen here in 2012, Trevor Noah was announced Monday as the new host of The Daily Show on Comedy Central.
Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 12:03 pm

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Trevor Noah Will Replace Jon Stewart As Host Of 'The Daily Show'

Trevor Noah, 31, will become the new host of The Daily Show later this year.
Comedy Central

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 11:13 am

South African comedian Trevor Noah will become the new host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show, stepping into the role Jon Stewart has filled for 16 years.

Confirming reports of his new job Monday morning, Noah tweeted, "No-one can replace Jon Stewart. But together with the amazing team at The Daily Show, we will continue to make this the best damn news show!"

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Around the Nation
7:13 am
Mon March 30, 2015

4-year-old Girl Boards Bus Alone At 3 A.M. To Get A Slushie

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
7:05 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Twitter Account Chronicles Adventures Of 'Florida Man'

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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U.S.
5:37 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate."
Alex Matzke for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 4:49 pm

Martin Kaste reported this audio story in two parts. Listen to Part 1 above, and tune into All Things Considered Monday to hear Part 2. The audio for Part 2 will also be available here Monday after 7 p.m. ET.

If you're murdered in America, there's a 1 in 3 chance that the police won't identify your killer.

To use the FBI's terminology, the national "clearance rate" for homicide today is 64.1 percent. Fifty years ago, it was more than 90 percent.

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NPR Story
5:37 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Employers And Insurers Gain Control In Workers' Compensation Disputes

Frances Stevens uses a custom ramp leading to her van. An accident at work in 1997 left her unable to walk. She received full workers' compensation benefits until two years ago, when the insurer withdrew her medications and home health aide. Her lawsuit is a test of California's use of anonymous, independent medical reviewers.
Glenna Gordon for ProPublica

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 12:41 pm

Frances Stevens could have been a contender. She was training to be a Golden Gloves boxer and working as a magazine publisher in 1997 when 1,000 copies of the latest issue arrived at her San Francisco office.

"I'd just turned 30. I was an athlete. I had a job that I loved, a life that I loved," she recalls. "And in a second my life changed."

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Around the Nation
5:34 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Specialists Monitor Conditions To Predict Northwest's Water Supply

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

Copyright 2015 Puget Sound Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kuow.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Law
5:26 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Prosecutors In Boston Marathon Bombing To Wrap Up Their Case

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
5:12 am
Mon March 30, 2015

How Many Crimes Do Your Police 'Clear'? Now You Can Find Out

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:22 pm

Violent crime in America has been falling for two decades. That's the good news. The bad news is, when crimes occur, they mostly go unpunished.

In fact, for most major crimes, police don't even make an arrest or identify a suspect. That's what police call "clearing" a crime; the "clearance rate" is the percentage of offenses cleared.

In 2013, the national clearance rate for homicide was 64 percent, and it's far lower for other violent offenses and property crimes.

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Code Switch
5:04 am
Mon March 30, 2015

In New York's Multinational Astoria, Diversity Is Key To Harmony

Catholic Charities Brooklyn and Queens holds classes for people who are learning English as a second language. A teacher leads the class in a rendition of Eric Clapton's "Wonderful Night."
Alexandra Starr NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 9:38 am

Queens, N.Y., is one of the most diverse urban spaces in the world, and one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Queens is Astoria, across the East River from upper Manhattan.

Astoria has a reputation as New York City's Greektown, but it's more like an urban United Nations. People from nearly 100 countries live there, according to census data.

They coexist pretty peacefully, but that wasn't always the case. The explosion of diversity has helped foster a more tranquil community.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Congressional Panels Probe Opiate Prescriptions At Wis. VA Hospital

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

Copyright 2015 Wisconsin Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wpr.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Sports
3:41 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Uphill Skiing Gains Traction In Colorado

For a more invigorating workout, nonprofit worker Chris Lane uphill skis near Aspen four times a week.
Marci Krivonen Aspen Public Radio

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

It's spring break season and families and college students are heading to Colorado's ski resorts. You've heard of downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, but a growing trend in these areas involves people skiing uphill.

It's midday in Aspen, Colo., and uphill skier Chris Lane is on a break from work at a nonprofit. He clicks into his ski bindings and begins his 1,600 vertical foot journey uphill — on skis.

He's going against downhill traffic, so he stays on the side of the ski run.

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Shots - Health News
3:40 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Sure, Use A Treadmill Desk — But You Still Need To Exercise

NPR senior Washington editor Beth Donovan walks on a treadmill desk in her office in Washington, D.C.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 10:55 am

First off, I need to be upfront: I have a treadmill desk. I got it about two years ago, prompted by all the studies showing the dangers of sitting all day. The idea is to get people more active and walking while working. The problem is, I don't use it. In fact, I probably only used it for a few months. I still stand all day, but I'm not walking.

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Shots - Health News
3:39 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Compression Clothing: Not The Magic Bullet For Performance

Olympic gold medalist Sanya Richards-Ross pulls on compression sleeves before a 400-meter race at the World Indoor Athletics Championships in Istanbul in 2012.
Martin Meissner AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 3:27 pm

Maybe you've seen them in the gym, or even squeezed into them yourself: super-tight T-shirts, leggings, knee and calf sleeves, even tube tops. More and more athletes are wearing compression garments, hoping they will improve their performance and recovery.

But do they work? This is a question Abigail Stickford, a postdoctoral researcher at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, wanted to answer.

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Health
5:43 pm
Sun March 29, 2015

Starting Families Later In Life Could Cause 'Grandparent Deficit'

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 5:44 pm

In a recent piece for Time magazine, Susanna Schrobsdorff presents an unexpected challenge for people starting families later in life. She tells NPR's Arun Rath about the variable she calls the grandparent deficit.

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Politics
5:43 pm
Sun March 29, 2015

Proposed Payday Industry Regulations Must Strike Delicate Balance

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 5:54 pm

The federal government is moving to reign in the payday loan industry, which critics say traps consumers in a damaging cycle of debt. A look at the possible effects of proposed regulations and what push back they might face.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
5:43 pm
Sun March 29, 2015

Videos On End-Of-Life Choices Ease Tough Conversation

Hawaii ranks 49th in the nation for use of home health care services during the last six months of someone's life. Videos from ACP Decisions show patients what their options are at the end of life.
ACP Decisions

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 2:01 pm

Lena Katakura's father is 81. He was recently diagnosed with esophageal cancer and doctors don't expect him to survive the illness. Katakura says a nurse at their Honolulu hospital gave them a form to fill out to indicate what kind of treatment he'd want at the end of life.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Sun March 29, 2015

Indiana Governor: Lawmakers To 'Clarify' Anti-Gay Law

Some of the hundreds of people who gathered outside the Indiana Statehouse on Saturday, for a rally against legislation signed Thursday by Gov. Mike Pence.
Rick Callahan AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 11:18 am

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence — facing a major backlash from a new law that would allow businesses in the state to cite religious objections to refuse to serve gay people — says he supports an effort to "clarify the intent" of the legislation while acknowledging surprise over the hostility it has sparked.

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The Salt
7:26 am
Sun March 29, 2015

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

A Cheez Whiz ad from 1952.
Courtesy of Kraft Foods

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 10:33 am

Will Cheez Whiz survive the merger?

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