National

The Two-Way
9:04 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Apple CEO Tim Cook Comes Out As Gay

Apple CEO Tim Cook waves to a crowd before he is honored by the Alabama Academy of Honor at the Alabama state Capitol on Monday.
Brynn Anderson AP

Tim Cook, the head of the world's most iconic technology company, has come out today in an op-ed on Bloomberg Businessweek, saying he's never denied his sexual orientation but "I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now.

"Being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day," Cook writes.

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Around the Nation
4:46 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Not A Haunted House: This Haunted Experience Terrorizes For Hours

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 10:00 am

Copyright 2014 KPBS-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kpbs.org.

Around the Nation
4:46 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Keep On Drillin'? Santa Barbara Prepares To Vote On Oil Future

A cow walks near oil pump jacks in Santa Maria, Calif. Oil production has long been a part of Santa Barbara County, but a new ballot measure could effectively shut down all new drilling operations there.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 8:58 am

Think of California's Santa Barbara County and you might picture the area's famous beaches or resorts and wineries. But in the northern reaches of the vast county, oil production has been a major contributor to the economy for almost a century.

So it's no surprise that the oil industry there is feverishly organizing to fight a local ballot initiative — Measure P — that would ban controversial drilling methods such as hydraulic fracturing. One thing that is turning heads, however, is the sheer volume of money flooding in to this local race, mainly from large oil companies.

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Around the Nation
6:31 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

As Infrastructure Crumbles, Trillions Of Gallons Of Water Lost

A water maintenance crew works on leaky infrastructure in Skokie, a Chicago suburb. The area loses almost 22 billion gallons of water a year because of ailing infrastructure.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 7:13 pm

Imagine Manhattan under almost 300 feet of water. Not water from a hurricane or a tsunami, but purified drinking water — 2.1 trillion gallons of it.

That's the amount of water that researchers estimate is lost each year in this country because of aging and leaky pipes, broken water mains and faulty meters.

Fixing that infrastructure won't be cheap, which is something every water consumer is likely to discover.

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Around the Nation
6:23 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

After The Waves, Staten Island Homeowner Takes Sandy Buyout

Stephen Drimalas stands outside his former home in Staten Island's Ocean Breeze neighborhood. He rebuilt his home after Superstorm Sandy but recently decided to sell it to the state of New York.
Jennifer Hsu WNYC

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 8:59 am

Two years after Superstorm Sandy struck the Northeast, hundreds of Staten Islanders are deciding whether to sell their shorefront homes to New York state, which wants to knock them down and let the empty land act as a buffer to the ocean.

Stephen Drimalas was one Staten Islander faced with this tough decision. He lived in a bungalow not far from the beach in the working-class neighborhood of Ocean Breeze. He barely escaped Sandy's floodwaters with his life.

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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
5:41 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

To Tackle Sexual Assault Cases, Colleges Enlist Investigators-For-Hire

Djuna Perkins, a former prosecutor, now conducts sexual assault investigations for colleges and universities. She's had to hire three more staff members this year to keep up with all the work.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 8:44 pm

As colleges continue to scramble under federal pressure to overhaul how they handle cases of sexual assault, the list of schools under investigation for botching cases continues to grow.

That's left some wondering if campuses will ever get it right, or if they might be better off leaving the job to others.

A growing number of campuses already have made the choice to do just that: Rather than try to train their provosts and professors to act like prosecutors, they're outsourcing the job to real ones instead.

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Goats and Soda
5:24 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

Mumadou Traore says the Ivory Coast's French bureaucracy is a "blessing" when it comes to Ebola.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:16 pm

There are all kinds of theories why Ebola hasn't arrived in Ivory Coast, despite the fact that it shares a long and very porous border with two Ebola-afflicted countries, Liberia and Guinea.

Some Ivory Coastians credit a beefed-up border patrol. The religious citizens in this Catholic country thank God. But Mumadou Traore, who works as a field coordinator for CARE International, has a third theory. He credits the legendarily infuriating Ivorian bureacracy.

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Around the Nation
4:30 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Some On Public Housing Waitlists Are Moving To Get Vouchers

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 8:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Sports
4:30 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Most Cavs Fans Willing To Forgive LeBron On His Return To Cleveland

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Health
4:30 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Ebola Nurse Fights Second Quarantine In Maine

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
4:30 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Colorado Gov. Hickenlooper's 'Independent Sheen' Has Faded

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
4:06 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Campuses Play Host To Tanning Beds, Despite Skin Cancer Risk

This may seems like a great campus amenity, until you get melanoma.
iStockphoto

The frigid winters left everyone hungry for sun at the college I attended in Chicago. I still remember a friend longing for a tanning studio, preferably just down the hill from the student center. And as it turns out, in a surprising number of college campuses now, that's just the case.

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Shots - Health News
3:42 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Scientists Implicate More Than 100 Genes In Causing Autism

iStockphoto

The hunt to find genes that cause autism has been a long slog, one hampered by a lack of technology and families willing to be tested.

But those efforts are starting to pay off. On Tuesday, researchers at more than 50 laboratories said they had identified more than 100 genes that are mutated in children with autism, dozens more than were known before.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
1:32 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Debate: Does Income Inequality Impair The American Dream?

Venture capitalist Nick Hanauer, with Elise Gould, argues that a robust economy relies on large numbers of innovators and affluent consumers — and that too much inequality prevents too many Americans from joining those groups.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Income inequality has been on the rise in the U.S. for decades. The top 1 percent of earners in the U.S. now holds a much greater share of national income than three decades ago. At the same time, incomes for the bottom half of American households have remained virtually flat.

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Goats and Soda
12:42 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Why The Ebola Evacuees Survived And What We Learned From Them

NBC cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, 33, contracted Ebola in Liberia, arrived in Nebraska for care on Oct. 6 and was released from the hospital Oct. 22.
Taylor Wilson Courtesy of Nebraska Medicine

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 3:03 pm

This is a week for reflecting on lessons learned from those who've survived Ebola.

Morning Edition aired a report on the experience of medical personnel at Emory Hospital, which has cared for four Ebola patients: three evacuees from West Africa (including Dr. Kent Brantly) and one of the Texas nurses.

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