National

The Two-Way
10:49 am
Tue July 22, 2014

U.S. Appeals Court Deals Blow To Obama's Health Law

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 11:23 am

A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday dealt a significant blow to the Affordable Care Act, when it threw out an IRS regulation that governs subsidies.

In essence, the decision throws out subsidies in the 36 states that did not set up their own insurance exchanges.

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Goats and Soda
10:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

The Immigrant Kids Have Health Issues — But Not The Ones You'd Think

Two young girls watch a World Cup soccer match on a television from their holding area where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Ariz. on June 18.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 11:14 am

Close to 60,000 children have crossed illegally into the U.S. since last October. They've sparked a crisis. But is it a humanitarian crisis or a public health one?

The children carry "swine flu, dengue fever, Ebola virus, and tuberculosis" and can spread the disease to the U.S., wrote Rep. Phil Gringrey (R-Ga.), a retired obstetrician-gynecologist, in a July 7 letter to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

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Shots - Health News
9:43 am
Tue July 22, 2014

States Experiment With Health Savings Accounts For Medicaid

Topp Yimgrimm/iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 10:19 am

If all goes according to plan, next year many Arkansas Medicaid beneficiaries will be required to make monthly contributions to so-called Health Independence Accounts. Those who don't may have to pay more of the cost of their medical services, and in some cases may be refused services.

Supporters say it will help nudge Medicaid beneficiaries toward becoming more cost-conscious health care consumers. Patient advocates are skeptical, pointing to studies showing that such financial "skin-in-the-game" requirements discourage low-income people from getting care that they need.

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Commentary
8:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

What 'The Golden Girls' Taught Us About AIDS

In true kick-ass Golden Girls fashion, Rose (Betty White, from left) Dorothy (Bea Arthur) and Blanche (Rue McClanahan) showed us how utterly human we all are at any age.
AP

"Dammit, why is this happening to me? I mean, this shouldn't happen to people like me."

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Shots - Health News
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Teens Say Looks Can Be Liberating Despite Fashion Police

Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:13 am

At Oakland Tech, like high schools all over, passing period is a time for passing judgments.

Aaliyah Douglass, a 17-year-old, gives me a taste of how harsh critiques can be at the school in Oakland, Calif. She starts by evaluating a male classmate who walks by wearing shorts, a T-shirt and Vans.

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U.S.
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Other Cities Poach Police From Detroit's Low-Wage Force

Officer Michael Crowder says his roots are too deep to leave Detroit, but he knows younger officers who were lured away by better pay.
Quinn Klinefelter Detroit Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 6:53 am

In a Detroit police squad car, Officer Michael Crowder cruises through one of the city's more well-to-do neighborhoods.

Crowder says he loves his current assignment — concentrating on a specific neighborhood community. But he notes that these are tough economic times in Detroit, and that's effecting everyone here — including the police.

"We've had food drives where the community comes up to the precinct," he says. "They'll give us baskets of food. Two, three years now, we've had officers depend on Goodfellow packages."

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The Two-Way
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Rubio: U.S. Cannot Admit All Children Seeking Asylum

Rubio, seen here addressing the National Press Club in May, told NPR he'll decide on a presidential run in the next few months
Alex Wong Getty

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:13 am

Sen. Marco Rubio argued that the nation's immigration laws need to be overhauled and said that Hillary Clinton would be a flawed candidate for president.

The Florida Republican made his comments in the second half of a two-part interview with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep on Tuesday. Rubio also said he will make a decision about whether to run for president himself sometime within the next few months.

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National Security
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Before Snowden: The Whistleblowers Who Tried To Lift The Veil

Over the last dozen years, whistleblowers at the National Security Agency have had a rough track record, facing FBI raids and lawsuits.
NSA Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 9:58 am

Bill Binney worked at the National Security Agency nearly three decades as one of its leading crypto-mathematicians. He then became one of its leading whistleblowers.

Now 70 and on crutches, both legs lost to diabetes, Binney recalls the July morning seven years ago when a dozen gun-wielding FBI agents burst through the front door of his home, at the end of a cul-de-sac a 10-minute drive from NSA headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.

"I first knew that they were in there when they were pointing a gun at me as I was coming out of the shower," Binney says.

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Environment
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

'Our Birds': Migratory Journeys Converge In Baltimore Gardens

Members of the Bird Ambassadors program painted and planted a broken canoe at a Baltimore charter school in November. The canoe was filled with species native to Maryland, providing food and habitat for local birds.
Susie Creamer Courtesy of Patterson Park Audubon Center

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:13 am

A couple of times a month, a group of migrant women and their children gather to plant shrubs and flowers in Baltimore's expansive Patterson Park.

The gardens feed and shelter migratory birds as part of the Patterson Park Audubon Center's Bird Ambassadors program.

Neotropical birds like the black-throated blue warbler and the Baltimore oriole migrate from the East Coast down to places like Mexico and Central America for the winter, says Susie Creamer, director of urban education and conservation at the center.

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Mental Health
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Son's Mental Illness Prompts Billionaire's Big Donation To Psychiatric Research

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:13 am

Ted Stanley is giving $650 million to the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard to find and treat the genetic underpinnings of mental illnesses. His son has bipolar disorder.

The Salt
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Some Food Companies Are Quietly Dumping GMO Ingredients

General Mills' Original Cheerios are now GMO-free. But you won't find a label on the box highlighting the change.
David Duprey AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 11:22 am

A tour of the Ben and Jerry's Factory in Waterbury, Vt., includes a stop at the "Flavor Graveyard," where ice cream combinations that didn't make the cut are put to rest under the shade of big trees.

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Goats and Soda
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:13 am

Saidu Kanneh was given a hero's welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

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The Two-Way
5:51 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Hospital Settles Lawsuit By Thousands Of Women Over Exam Photos

The Johns Hopkins Health System will pay $190 million to former patients of a gynecologist who used a small camera to secretly film examinations, in one of the the largest sexual misconduct settlements involving a physician.

The Baltimore-based hospital is settling a class-action lawsuit that includes more than 7,000 women and at least 62 minors; more women will likely register with the suit.

From member station WYPR, Christopher Connelly reports:

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Shots - Health News
5:06 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

What The Odds Fail To Capture When A Health Crisis Hits

Brian Zikmund-Fisher with his wife, Naomi, and daughter, Eve, in 1999, after he had a bone marrow transplant. He says he made the decision to have the treatment based on factors he couldn't quantify.
Courtesy of Brian Zikmund-Fisher

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 6:35 pm

How well do we understand and act on probabilities that something will happen? A 30 percent chance of this or an 80 percent chance of that?

As it turns out, making decisions based on the odds can be an extremely difficult thing to do, even for people who study the science of how we make decisions.

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Shots - Health News
4:47 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

High-Performing Charter Schools May Improve Students' Health

Researchers are just starting to look at how school choice affects health.
romester/iStockphoto

Many people are intensely interested in how publicly funded charter schools affect children, and that includes not just their academic achievement but their health.

Researchers from UCLA and the Rand Corp. wanted to know whether attending a high-performing charter school reduced the rates of risky health behaviors among low-income minority teenagers.

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