National

Goats and Soda
12:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Blizzard In Nepal Deals A Blow To Porters As Well As Trekkers

Bilbahadur Tamang, right, and Umesh Lama load up for a trek on the popular Annapurna Circuit.
Donatella Lorch for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:41 pm

In early October, blizzard conditions in Nepal killed more than 16 foreign trekkers and 17 locals, most of them lightly-dressed porters who were carrying the trekkers' gear. The tragedy calls attention to the dangers of trekking — and the risky life of local porters.

At 42, Rane Tamang knows the trekking business well. From a poor village in central Nepal and with little formal education, he started work as a porter 25 years ago, lugging 90 pounds of gear up mountains. He moved up to serve as an assistant cook and now alternates between cook and guide.

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The Salt
11:49 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

These pomegranates are about an inch smaller than the typical size, but they're packed with antioxidants.
Courtesy of Tiziana Centofanti

California's severe drought is putting stress on everyone these days: the neighborhoods whose wells are running dry; the farmers forced to experiment with growing their produce with much less water; and of course, the thirsty fruits and vegetables themselves.

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The Protojournalist
11:15 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Girl Scouts Look For A Way Out Of The Woods

Girl Scouts model contemporary uniforms.
From Girl Scouts of the USA website

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:58 pm

The Girl Scouts organization wants s'more – members and leaders, that is.

Membership in Girl Scouts of the USA is on the decline. In the past year, according to the group's official blog, there has been a significant drop nationwide – down 400,000 girls and adults — from 3.2 million to 2.8 million.

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Economy
10:52 am
Thu October 23, 2014

You're Enjoying Low Gas Prices, But Is It Really A Good Sign?

Macy Gould shared this photo from Lexington, Ky., where the gas prices are under three dollars.
Macy Gould Instagram

All around the country, gasoline prices have been falling for weeks, down to an average of about $3 a gallon. Those lower prices are helping restrain inflation across the board.

On Wednesday, the Labor Department said its consumer price index barely inched up 0.1 percent last month. Over the last 12 months, the CPI has risen by 1.7 percent, roughly half of its historical average rate of increase.

That sounds great for consumers.

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Shots - Health News
8:58 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza.
Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 1:00 pm

An unusual government moratorium aimed at controversial research with high-risk viruses has halted important public health research, scientists told an advisory committee to the federal government on Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Family Says Nurse Amber Vinson Is Free Of Ebola

Amber Vinson in a photograph taken earlier this week at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Officials at Emory University Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention couldn't detect Ebola in Amber Vinson as of Tuesday evening, her family said in a statement.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 11:54 am

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET.

A Texas nurse who contracted Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital is now free of the potentially deadly virus, her family says.

Amber Vinson, 29, remains in treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, but her family said in a statement that since Tuesday evening, doctors had been unable to detect traces of the disease in her blood.

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Monkey See
8:03 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour, Small Batch: Announcing Our Biggest Live Show Yet

NPR

If you've followed the history of Pop Culture Happy Hour live shows, you know that they have a history of selling out quickly. Our last D.C. appearance, at NPR's Studio 1, sold out in two minutes, while our New York debut, at Brooklyn's Bell House, sold out in 10 seconds. I say this not to brag — heaven forfend! — but to acknowledge that we haven't done a great job making our live tapings available to everyone who wishes to attend.

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Business
5:07 am
Thu October 23, 2014

What The New Factory Worker Should Know

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 8:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
4:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Die-Hard And Fair-Weather Fans Alike Have A Case Of Royals Fever

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

American Made: The New Manufacturing Landscape
4:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

No Mere Merry-Go-Round: Ohio Carousel Maker Carves From Scratch

The National Zoo's carousel is among dozens that Carousel Works has installed around the U.S., each made to fit in with its surroundings.
James Clark NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 10:58 am

Wooden carousels with carved and painted animals seem like a relic of the past. But Carousel Works in Mansfield, Ohio, is still making them to order.

"Our biggest trade secret is we've got this big barrel of elbow grease. You've gotta come in here and work every day," says co-owner Art Ritchie.

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Goats and Soda
4:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ebola Is Keeping Kids From Getting Vaccinated In Liberia

A mom at the Community Clinic in Louisiana Township, about 15 miles from Monrovia, says all her children have been vaccinated.
Jon Hamilton NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 9:21 am

When Ebola began killing people in the Monrovia suburb of Clara Town several months ago, some residents blamed vaccines.

One vaccinator in the town says mothers didn't want her near their babies.

"They had a notion that when the people come to the hospital, we would inject them and kill them," says vaccinator Che Che Richardson at the Clara Town Health Center, "because it was the hospital giving the people Ebola."

Rumors like that, combined with the closing of many health facilities, have caused childhood vaccinations rates to plummet in Liberia.

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Environment
5:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:44 pm

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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Goats and Soda
4:50 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Drones Are Taking Pictures That Could Demystify A Malaria Surge

Researchers download images after a drone flight in Sabah, Malaysia.
Courtesy of Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al

Aerial drones are targeting a new enemy: malaria.

Four hundred feet above a Malaysian forest, a three-foot eBee drone hovers and takes pictures with a 16-megapixel camera every 10 to 20 seconds. But it's not gathering images of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. Even today's best drones aren't capable of such a photographic marvel. Rather, the drone is looking at a changing landscape that holds clues to the disease's spread.

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Goats and Soda
4:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Surrogacy Storm In Thailand: A Rejected Baby, A Busy Babymaker

Thai surrogate mother Pattaramon Chanbua with her baby Gammy, who was born with Down Syndrome. An Australian couple who'd arranged for Pattaramon to serve as their surrogate rejected the child.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:28 pm

Baby Gammy might mean the end of Thailand's lucrative surrogacy business.

He's the child who was carried by a surrogate mom in Thailand-- and rejected by the Australian couple who had agreed to pay the mother $12,000. The reason: Prenatal testing showed that the baby, a twin, had Down syndrome.

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Law
4:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Should Police Be Able To Keep Their Devices Secret?

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 10:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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