National

Goats and Soda
7:18 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Last-Resort Antibiotics In Jeopardy As Use Rises Globally

David Livermore, the director of the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring and Reference Laboratory in London, studies a new class of superbugs, called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE.
Suzanne Plunkett Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:03 pm

The total doses of antibiotics sold in clinics and pharmacies around the world rose 36 percent from 2000 to 2010, scientists reported Wednesday.

The finding, published in The Lancet Infectious Disease, comes from the first study to look at global antibiotic consumption in the 21st century. And it seems like good news, right?

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The Two-Way
6:58 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

An Actor, A University And A Famous Name Lead To A Lawsuit

John Wayne went by "Duke" nearly all his life, but that's not the name that appeared on his driver's license.
AP

What do you think of when you hear the name Duke? That question is at the heart of a legal dispute between Duke University and the estate of John Wayne.

Fans of the late film star will recall that he went by the nickname "Duke," which his biographers have pointed out he picked up in childhood from a dog. (He preferred it to his real first name, which was Marion).

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Men In America
5:52 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

On Calif. Cattle Ranch, Students Wrangle With Meaning Of Manhood

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:39 pm

For All Things Considered's "Men in America" series, NPR's Kelly McEvers sent this report on Deep Springs College — the all-male college that her husband attended, and where he and McEvers have both taught.

About a hundred years ago, a man named L.L. Nunn was building power plants in the American West. He wanted a place where workers could be educated — and educated people could do work.

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It's All Politics
5:49 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Should President Obama Visit The Texas Border?

Immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally stand in line for bus tickets after their release in June from a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in McAllen, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:07 pm

Much of President Obama's presidency currently falls into the category of damned if he does, damned if he doesn't.

That certainly is true on the question of whether he should visit the U.S.-Mexico border during his two-day visit to Texas.

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The Salt
5:35 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Is Foster Farms A Food Safety Pioneer Or A Persistent Offender?

Foster Farms set up new procedures to deal with salmonella contamination after the USDA threatened to shut down its plants last fall.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:19 pm

Foster Farms, a chicken producer in California, just can't seem to stop bleeding bad news.

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Man Tied To Nazis Dies In Michigan At Age 93

John Kalymon talks to The Associated Press in 2009 outside his home in Troy, Mich. Kalymon died June 29.
Paul Sancya AP

John Kalymon of Troy, Mich., died June 29. He was 93. The Associated Press reports that he had pneumonia, prostate cancer and dementia. But during World War II, Kalymon served in a Nazi-allied police force, and for that he'd been ordered deported by a U.S. court.

Kalymon had always denied the claims against him.

"The last two years he had no idea about anything about his life," his son Alex Kalymon told the AP. "He was just struggling to live and his mind wasn't there."

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Shots - Health News
4:23 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Do The World Cup's Fluttering Kicks Put Fans' Hearts At Risk?

Brazil fans in Rio de Janeiro watch in horror as Germany routs the home team in the World Cup semifinal match played Tuesday.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Brazil's cataclysmic World Cup loss to Germany broke the heart of a nation.

But for some fans, the emotional anguish may have felt all too real – resulting in heart attacks that not even the U.S.'s star goalie Tim Howard could stop.

A 2008 analysis published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that cardiac events skyrocketed during World Cup matches.

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Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Humpty's 2nd Fall Calls For An Artist, Not An Army

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now to a modern twist on an old tale of an anthropomorphic egg.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We're talking, of course, about Humpty Dumpty. You know, the one who sat on a wall and had a great fall. And then there was the mess with all the king's horses and all the king's men. And Robert, you know the rest. They couldn't put Humpty together again.

SIEGEL: But Mr. Dumpty may have a happier ending at the Enchanted Forest theme park in Salem, Oregon. This real-life nursery rhyme starts out in a similar way.

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Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Against The Dire Headlines, A Few Words In Defense Of Fraternities

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

One male stereotype tackled, the grizzly cowboy, another to go, the Greek man on campus. About 85,000 young men join fraternities every year. That's amid high profile stories about hazing, sexual assault, alcohol related accidents and deaths involving Greek houses. Well, given all that we wanted to ask a few male college students why they joined fraternities and what they've gotten out of the experience. Here's what they had to say.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN 1: It's never a dull moment to be in a fraternity.

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Television
3:09 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

'The Strain' And 'Extant' Play On Fears Of Forces Out Of Our Control

The threat is both viral and vampire in The Strain, a show about the sudden outbreak of a disease that kills most of its victims — then begins to mutate them into another species entirely.
Michael Gibson FX

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 4:02 pm

They say every generation gets the science fiction it deserves, built around its biggest and most primal fears. Well, maybe they don't say that — but they should. In the '50s, all those movies about mutant giant monsters going berserk were a way for us to channel our fears about the atomic bomb. In the same way, in that same decade, all those body-snatcher movies were about being unable to tell friend from foe, or trust even your closest loved ones — the perfect paranoid parable for the Communist witch-hunting era.

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Here & Now
3:02 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Medal Of Honor Recipient Reflects On Honor And Loss

Sgt. Ryan Pitts, pictured here at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan, will become the ninth living recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery in Afghanistan or Iraq. (U.S. Army)

The Battle of Wanat is one of the bloodiest battles of the war in Afghanistan. Nine American soldiers were killed and more than two dozen were wounded when hundreds of insurgents assaulted the Army outpost they were building in Waygal Valley on July 13, 2008. It was just after 4 o’clock that morning when the American soldiers were blasted with machine guns, rocket propelled grenades and hand grenades.

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The Salt
3:00 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Play With Your Food: The Kandinsky-Inspired Fine Art Food Challenge

Kazimir Malevich/Tretyakov Gallery; Beth Novey/NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 4:42 pm

We love to have fun with food, and as you may recall, we recently told you about a scientific experiment showing that people who ate a salad arranged like a Kandinsky painting said it tasted better and was worth more money than a typical pile of greens.

The experiment inspired us to challenge you to tweet pictures of your food as fine art. And boy, you delivered.

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Monkey See
12:57 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Social Media Meltdowns Highlight The Power Of The Audience

Anthony Cumia, at an April event commemorating 20 years of The Opie & Anthony Show, was fired after a series of racially charged tweets.
Cindy Ord Getty Images Entertainment

At first glance, Adam Richman and Anthony Cumia might not seem to have much in common.

True enough, they are media stars who took a hard fall thanks to untoward comments on social media. Richman, a host on the Travel Channel, saw the debut of his new show delayed indefinitely after an online spat led him to suggest one critic commit suicide.

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Beauty Shop
12:29 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Getting Married: Should You Wait Until You Can Afford It?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Can I Just Tell You?
12:29 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

After A Bad Bike Crash, Lessons In Limits And Love

Tell Me More producer Amy Ta in racing mode.
John Clark Jr. Courtesy of Amy Ta

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:50 pm

My last hill ride was epic — just not in the way I'd hoped it would be. I'll always remember the date: June 7. The route was called "Hell's Delight." Seventy miles of the steepest hills I had ever done. And trust me, I've done a lot.

But "Hell's Delight" was a new kind of suffering. And, although we road racers enjoy suffering, that day I went too far. About 5 miles before the finish, I crashed. My jaw and left cheekbone broke. Half my face was bleeding; so was my brain. There were abrasions on my arms, shoulders, neck, and left leg. I needed surgery to fix my jaw.

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