National

SXSW Music Festival
3:17 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Doritos Stage Pulled From SXSW But Issues Remain

At SXSW 2014, pop star Lady Gaga performed on a stage made to look like a five-story-tall Doritos vending machine, which won't be returning this week.
Kevin Mazur WireImage/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 11:01 am

South by Southwest is in its 28th year, with its music festival starting Wednesday and featuring more than 2,200 bands from 62 countries.

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Science
3:17 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Are Humans Really Headed To Mars Anytime Soon?

Mars, anyone? Six researchers from the Mars Society sport their best space duds during this 2014 simulation of the conditions that explorers of the Red Planet might face. (From left) Ian Silversides, Anastasiya Stepanova, Alexandre Mangeot and Claude-Michel Laroche.
Micke Sebastien Paris Match via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 9:15 am

With recent news headlines proclaiming that dozens of people have been selected as finalists for a Martian astronaut corps, it might seem like a trip to this alien world might finally be close at hand.

But let's have a little reality check. What are the chances that we really will see people on the Red Planet in the next couple of decades?

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Goats and Soda
8:03 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

If You're One Of The World's 382 Million Diabetics, Your Wages May Dip

The blue circle is the symbol of diabetes — carried here by students marching in a World Diabetes Day rally in Kolkata, India.
Bikas Das AP

Whenever I hear statistics that diabetes costs the U.S. $245 billion a year — and billions more globally — these numbers feel too big to get my head around.

So a new analysis — which attempts to break down the cost-per-person toll of diabetes in countries around the globe — caught my attention.

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Shots - Health News
6:33 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Clues To Autism, Schizophrenia Emerge From Cerebellum Research

Jonathan Keleher talks with a colleague, Rafael Wainhaus, at work. Keleher was born without a cerebellum, but his brain has developed work-arounds for solving problems of balance and abstract thought.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:27 pm

A new understanding of the brain's cerebellum could lead to new treatments for people with problems caused by some strokes, autism and even schizophrenia.

That's because there's growing evidence that symptoms ranging from difficulty with abstract thinking to emotional instability to psychosis all have links to the cerebellum, says Jeremy Schmahmann, a professor of neurology at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital.

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It's All Politics
6:01 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

War Criminals Next Door: Immigration Division Brings Violators To Justice

Salvadoran Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova, shown in an undated photo, is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four Americans in 1980.
AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:48 pm

An appeals panel in Florida has upheld a deportation order against a former defense minister of El Salvador, who is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four American churchwomen in 1980. Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was allowed to retire in the U.S. in 1989. Now, a little known unit of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is trying to expel him as well as others charged with human rights abuses.

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Fine Art
5:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

In Detroit's Rivera And Kahlo Exhibit, A Portrait Of A Resilient City

A detail from the north wall of Diego Rivera's Detroit Industry murals shows workers on the automobile assembly line. After Detroit declared bankruptcy, the murals were at risk of being sold. Click here for a larger view.
Detroit Institute of Arts

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 8:01 pm

This weekend, visitors to the Detroit Institute of Arts buzzed with excitement over a new exhibit — it was a big moment for the once-troubled museum. The DIA spent much of the last two years under threat as its owner, the city of Detroit, looked for ways to emerge from bankruptcy.

Finally, in November, a "grand bargain" was struck. Foundations, private donors and the state of Michigan together raised more than $800 million to help rescue public employee pensions. In return, ownership of the DIA was transferred to a trust — thereby securing its future.

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Law
5:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Officers Recall Night Of Battle With Boston Marathon Bombing Suspects

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 8:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
5:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

FEMA's Appeals Process Favored Insurance Companies Almost Every Time

Doug Quinn's ranch house in Toms River, N.J., was heavily damaged by flooding during Hurricane Sandy. His insurance company gave him half the value of his home and when he appealed, FEMA sided with the insurance company.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 3:15 pm

FEMA has taken the unprecedented step of reopening all Superstorm Sandy flood claims because thousands of homeowners said insurance companies intentionally lowballed damage estimates.

Similar allegations surfaced in 2004 after Hurricane Isabel struck the Mid-Atlantic. To answer critics then, FEMA formalized an appeals process.

That appeals process has gone against Sandy victims almost every time, statistics show.

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U.S.
5:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

California Judges Must Cut Ties With The Boy Scouts

The California Supreme Court ban prohibits state judges from belonging to nonprofit youth organizations that practice discrimination. That includes Boy Scouts, which has restricted gay troop leaders.
David Manning Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 2:52 pm

California has banned state court judges from belonging to the Boy Scouts. The move extends an earlier ban on judges' belonging to groups that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation that had an exemption for youth groups. Judges have one year to sever their ties with the Boy Scouts.

Judges are already banned from joining lots of groups that other people can belong to. For example, they can't be members of country clubs that don't admit Jews or women.

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It's All Politics
5:05 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

I'm Mike Huckabee, And I Approve This ... Infomercial?

In an infomercial for Barton Publishing's Diabetes Solution Kit Huckabee says he knows diabetes can be reversed "because I did it and today, you can too."
Getty Images

Mike Huckabee has always had the reputation as a candidate who does things outside the box.

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NPR News Investigations
4:58 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

California Auditing Insurance Company That Took Away Home Health Aide

Joel Ramirez climbs back into his wheelchair with the help of Francisco Guardado, a home health aide, at his home in Rialto, Calif.
Patrick T. Fallon for ProPublica

California's labor department says it will conduct an audit of how Travelers Insurance handled the case of paralyzed worker Joel Ramirez, who was left to fend for himself for months after the company withdrew his 24-hour home health care.

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Politics
4:43 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

New Hampshire Visit Offers Glimpse Into Possible Walker, Bush Rivalry

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 8:01 pm

The two likely Republican presidential front-runners, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, visited New Hampshire this weekend. Though neither has officially declared their candidacy, The Boston Globe's James Pindell says they're giving political reporters a lot to talk about.

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National Security
4:37 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Most Americans' Behavior Unchanged After Snowden Revelations, Study Finds

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 8:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
3:04 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Does Success Of HBO's 'The Jinx' Herald New Form Of True-Crime TV?

Robert Durst, filmed on the streets of Manhattan for HBO's The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst.
HBO

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:25 am

It was the kind of moment true-crime TV fans live for but almost never get to see: a suspected murderer seeming to confess his guilt while the audience listens in.

That bombshell admission aired Sunday at the end of HBO's docu-series The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, capping a six-part series. It unfolded as something of a cat-and-mouse game between Durst, the scion of a wealthy New York family who is suspected of killing his wife, a best friend and a neighbor in separate crimes reaching back to 1982, and filmmaker Andrew Jarecki.

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Shots - Health News
2:33 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Obamacare Cut The Ranks Of The Uninsured By A Third

A total of 16.4 million non-elderly adults have gained health insurance coverage since the Affordable Care Act became law five years ago this month. It's a reduction in the ranks of the uninsured the the Department of Health and Human Services called historic.

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Ebola Patient Being Treated In Maryland Is In Critical Condition

The status of a patient with Ebola who was recently admitted to a specialized federal facility in Bethesda, Md., has changed from serious to critical condition. The American health care worker, whose identity hasn't been publicly released, was taken to the Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health last week.

The patient being cared for in Bethesda contracted Ebola while volunteering in Sierra Leone, where the aid worker had been with the group Partners in Health. The person was flown back to the U.S. Thursday, aboard a private jet.

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Shots - Health News
1:15 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Vaccination Gaps Helped Fuel Disneyland Measles Spread

Disneyland and California Adventure Park seen in late December, soon after measles was contracted by some visitors to Disneyland.
George Frey Landov

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 9:56 am

California has been dealing with a big measles outbreak since December, when cases emerged among visitors to Disneyland in Orange County.

Measles spread quickly afterward. As of Friday, the state had confirmed 133 measles cases among residents since December.

Of the people who got sick and for whom the state could determine vaccination status, 57 people hadn't been vaccinated against measles and 20 people had had at least one shot of the vaccine.

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The Salt
12:24 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Looks Matter: A Century Of Iconic Food Packaging

Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:49 pm

We take the packaging our food comes in for granted. Yet many of the boxes, bags and bottles that protect our edibles were once groundbreaking — both in their design and in how they changed our perception of what's inside. Sometimes, packaging is so distinctive, it transforms food from mere consumer product to cultural icon. As Stephen Heller, author of more than 100 books on design and popular culture, says, "Coca-Cola is not a bottle of soda — it's Coca-Cola."

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U.S.
6:08 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Once Lost, Internment Camp In Hawaii Now A National Monument

Hawaii's Honouliuli Internment Camp held thousands of prisoners of war and hundreds of Japanese-American citizens during World War II
Courtesy of Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 2:39 pm

The Honouliuli internment camp, not far from Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, held as many as 4,000 prisoners during World War II, including hundreds of Japanese-Americans.

In February, President Obama named the location a national monument.

The camp became known by prisoners as "jigokudani," or "Hell's Valley," says Carole Hayashino, the president of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii.

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Around the Nation
5:36 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Leading The Charge At South By Southwest

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 7:50 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:21 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Suspect Arrested In Shooting Of Police In Ferguson

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 9:20 am

Copyright 2015 KWMU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.stlpublicradio.org.

Architecture
3:09 am
Mon March 16, 2015

With Sunny, Modern Homes, Joseph Eichler Built The Suburbs In Style

After World War II, developer Joseph Eichler built well-designed and well-crafted tract homes that dotted California suburbs.
Stephen Schafer

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 9:04 pm

In Palm Springs, Calif., a $1 million home was just built — with plans resurrected from 1951. The original sold for about $15,000, and was called an Eichler, after developer Joseph Eichler, who offered well-designed, well-built tract homes to the masses a half-century ago.

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Shots - Health News
3:08 am
Mon March 16, 2015

A Man's Incomplete Brain Reveals Cerebellum's Role In Thought And Emotion

Jonathan Keleher is one of a handful of people who have lived their entire lives without a cerebellum.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:27 pm

Since his birth 33 years ago, Jonathan Keleher has been living without a cerebellum, a structure that usually contains about half the brain's neurons.

This exceedingly rare condition has left Jonathan with a distinctive way of speaking and a walk that is slightly awkward. He also lacks the balance to ride a bicycle.

But all that hasn't kept him from living on his own, holding down an office job and charming pretty much every person he meets.

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Around the Nation
5:23 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

Police Dog On Payroll: 'Indiana Bones' Is Woman's Best Friend

Indiana "Indy" Bones reports for duty on a field investigation, in which the dog sniffs to detect human remains for a reopened cold case.
Gloria Hillard NPR

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 11:48 am

From bomb and drug-sniffing duties to neighborhood patrol, dogs are widely used in law enforcement. Many agencies rely on volunteer canine teams to assist them with search and rescue operations and criminal investigations.

But the county of Los Angeles has a full-time four-legged detective on its payroll: Indiana Bones, or "Indy."

Karina Peck, an investigator and canine handler with the Los Angeles County coroner's office, is in a truck, rolling over uneven, hard-packed earth that dead-ends in a shallow canyon.

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My Big Break
5:21 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

From Waitress To TV Writer: A 'Surreal, Fantastic Cinderella Story'

Diane Ruggiero-Wright is a writer and producer for shows including Veronica Mars and the new CW show iZombie.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 11:28 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Diane Ruggiero-Wright has written and produced a number of TV shows, including the cult classic Veronica Mars. She's the co-creator of the new show iZombie — about a zombie who pretends to be a psychic and solves murders — which premieres on The CW on Tuesday.

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Health
5:17 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

Amid Rising Concern About Addiction, Universities Focus On Recovery

Students in recovery from substance abuse are finding support on a growing number of college and university campuses, including the University of Texas at Austin.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 6:22 pm

In murder mystery novels, when the hero, a private detective or homicide cop, drops by a late-night Alcoholics Anonymous meeting to stave off a sudden craving for a beer or two or 20, it's usually in some dingy church basement or dilapidated storefront on the seedier side of town. There's a pot of burnt coffee and a few stale doughnuts on a back table.

The Center for Students in Recovery at the University of Texas could not be more different.

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Health
5:17 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

Why Is The Risk Of Youth Suicide Higher In Rural Areas?

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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The Two-Way
1:56 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

Arrest Made In Shooting Of Two Officers In Ferguson, Police Say

Jeffrey Williams, 20, is charged with two counts of first-degree assault in connection with the shooting of two police officers in Ferguson on March 12.
St. Louis County Police Department AP

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 8:44 pm

Updated at 3:45 p.m.

The St. Louis County Police Department says an arrest has been made in connection with the shooting of two officers during a protest in Ferguson, Mo., last week.

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The Two-Way
11:54 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Robert Durst, Subject Of HBO's 'The Jinx,' Arrested In New Orleans

This booking photo provided by the Orleans Parish Sheriff's Office shows Robert Durst, after his arrest Saturday in New Orleans on an extradition warrant to Los Angeles.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 11:23 am

Updated at 8:00 p.m. ET

At the conclusion of the HBO documentary The Jinx, the filmmakers presented audio of Robert Durst whispering to himself, "What the hell did I do? Killed them all, of course" — an apparent reference to the alleged crimes that have clouded his life in suspicion.

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Around the Nation
10:25 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Instead Of Tickets, N.H. Police Hand Out Good-Deed Coupons

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 11:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Police in Farmington, N.H., are issuing tickets all over town. But these are tickets you might not mind getting.

CHIEF JOHN DRURY: They're for a slice of pizza or a small French fry.

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