National

The Salt
4:00 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

Sodium Sleuths: Do Southerners Eat More Salt Than The Rest Of Us?

The salty suspects: Some 70 percent of the cheeses, soups, cold cuts and pizzas we buy at the grocery store exceed the Food and Drug Administration's "healthy" labeling standards for salt. Since we eat so much bread, it is β€” perhaps surprisingly β€” the top contributor of sodium to our diets.
iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 5:02 pm

It's not the salt shakers on our tables that explain why Americans consume way too much sodium. It's the processed foods we buy in grocery stores.

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It's All Politics
1:24 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

The Menendez Paradox: Facing Charges After Testifying Against Corruption

Sen. Robert Menendez on his way to the Senate floor for a series of votes last week.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 10:50 pm

Sen. Bob Menendez, who came up in the sharp-edged politics of Hudson County, N.J., has been under varying levels of ethics scrutiny in seven of his nine-plus years as a senator.

He'd never been indicted β€” until yesterday.

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Monkey See
1:11 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

Jokes, Fights And Controversy In A Frictionless Void

Fer Gregory iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 7:58 pm

There's a saying about lawyers in court, which is that you never ask a question you don't know the answer to. I'm going to warn you now that this is not court, and that at the heart of this piece are a bunch of questions I don't know the answers to.

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Shots - Health News
1:10 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

Will Your Child Become Nearsighted? One Simple Way To Find Out

You really should go out and play. But I can't blame the TV for your nearsightedness.
FPG Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 5:13 pm

This is for everyone whose parents said, "Sitting too close to the TV is going to ruin your eyes." In other words, pretty much all of us.

Sitting too close to the TV doesn't predict nearsightedness, according to a study that tracked the vision of thousands of children over 20 years. Nor does doing a lot of close work.

Instead, as early as age 6 a child's refractive error β€” the measurements used for an eyeglass prescription β€” best predicts the risk.

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Goats and Soda
12:06 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

The Kids Brainwashed By Boko Haram Were Silent For Good Reason

No one knows how many children have been affected by the spread of Boko Haram across Nigeria and neighboring countries. This photo shows the school uniforms of the girls kidnapped from a school a year ago.
Glenna Gordon Glenna Gordon for NPR

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 8:52 am

It's a story that spread around the world last month: The Cameroonian army had rescued scores of children from Boko Haram. Morning Edition was among the news outlets that covered the story of youngsters said to be so traumatized, they'd forgotten their names.

This was the account of Christopher Fomunyoh, an expert on democracy in Africa and native Cameroonian who had traveled to the center where the children were being held.

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The Two-Way
11:49 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Megachurch Founder, Televangelist Robert Schuller Dies At 88

Rev. Robert H. Schuller, pastor of the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif., speaks at the church in 1996. Schuller, who hosted the top-rated Hour of Power telecast for decades, died Thursday at age 88.
Michael Tweed AP

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 12:34 pm

Christian televangelist Robert Schuller, best known for the Sunday morning Hour of Power telecast he hosted for decades from his Crystal Cathedral megachurch in California, has died at 88.

Schuller's daughter, Carol Schuller Milner, and grandson, Rev. Bobby Schuller, announced the news on Twitter. Bobby Schuller, who has taken over as host of a scaled-back Hour of Power, said today that his grandfather "passed this morning into eternal life with Christ."

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NPR History Dept.
11:15 am
Thu April 2, 2015

After Selma, King's March On Ballot Boxes

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. speaking in Kingstree, S.C., as seen in the video clip.
University of South Carolina Archives

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 11:16 am

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. β€” who was assassinated 47 years ago this week β€” will long be remembered for the many meaningful marches he led or joined, including ones on Washington in 1963, on Frankfort, Ky., in 1964 and from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., in 1965.

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Indiana, Arkansas Amend 'Religious Freedom' Laws

A sign reading, "This business serves everyone," was placed in the window of Bernadette's Barbershop in downtown Lafayette, Ind., in response to the passage of the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act.
Nate Chute Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 6:23 pm

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

Lawmakers in Indiana and Arkansas have approved changes to their respective "religious freedom" measures designed to answer critics who charged the laws were meant to discriminate against gays and lesbians by allowing businesses to refuse them service.

The amendments were passed by Legislatures in Indianapolis and Little Rock after a day of wrestling over the details of amendments to the measures.

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Shots - Health News
9:52 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Searching Online May Make You Think You're Smarter Than You Are

Stuart Kinlough Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 5:13 pm

Using the Internet is an easy way to feel omniscient. Enter a search term and the answers appear before your eyes.

But at any moment you're also just a few taps away from becoming an insufferable know-it-all. Searching for answers online gives people an inflated sense of their own knowledge, according to a study. It makes people think they know more than they actually do.

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Around the Nation
7:17 am
Thu April 2, 2015

From One Comedian To Another: You Should Try Politics

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 10:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu April 2, 2015

11 Ex-Atlanta Public School Employees Found Guilty In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 10:08 am

Copyright 2015 WABE-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wabe.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Politics
5:11 am
Thu April 2, 2015

What's Changed Since The First Religious Liberty Law Was Passed In 1993?

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 9:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Business
5:07 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Arkansas Governor Asks Lawmakers To Rework Religious Liberty Bill

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 10:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Southern Baptist Minister: Religious Liberty Law Permits Denial Of Some Services

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 2:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's ask what Indiana's Religious Freedom Restoration Act really means.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Menendez 'Outraged' By His Indictment On Corruption Charges

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 5:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A powerful senator from New Jersey has been indicted on federal corruption charges - eight counts bribery - after accepting gifts from a Florida doctor in exchange for favors. NPR's Ailsa Chang has the story.

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Arts & Life
4:04 am
Thu April 2, 2015

After Nazi Plunder, A Quest To Bring Home The 'Woman In Gold'

Maria Altmann fought her way to the U.S. Supreme Court to force the Austrian government to give back this painting by Gustav Klimt of her aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer.
DeAgostini Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 4:52 pm

Maria Altmann was 88 when I first met her by phone in 2004. "Would it be possible to call back in a few minutes?" she asked. "I'm feeling a little dizzy and would like a cup of coffee to revive myself."

"Of course," I said, imagining Mrs. Altmann as a somewhat frail grandmother. Old she was, but frail she was not.

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Race
4:00 am
Thu April 2, 2015

More African-Americans Support Carrying Legal Guns For Self-Defense

Rick Ector trains new gun owners at a range just outside of Detroit. He supports more African-Americans getting permits to carry concealed weapons.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 10:08 am

When James Craig was a young man in the 1970s, he says law-abiding people wouldn't dream of carrying guns. But then he left town to pursue a career in policing. In the years he was gone, Michigan liberalized its gun laws, making it easier for people to get concealed-carry permits.

When he came back to become Detroit's police chief in 2013, he found a whole new reality.

"You would have thought, given the dynamic of people who carry weapons, that we were maybe in Texas," he says. "But in fact, we were in Detroit, Michigan!"

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The Two-Way
11:02 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Still Need A Lawn Yeti? Good News β€” SkyMall May Be Cleared For Relaunch

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 3:50 pm

In January, SkyMall LLC and its parent company, Xhibit Corp., filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy, with some $50 million in liabilities. The company's assets were set to go up for auction in late March. The news led to a strong show of support for the in-flight catalog.

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Politics
5:12 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Indiana's 'Religious Freedom' Law Differs From Other States

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:00 pm

Nineteen other states have religious freedom laws, and there's even a federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Garrett Epps, professor of law at the University of Baltimore, who wrote about what separates Indiana's legislation from the others for The Atlantic.

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Politics
5:12 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Arkansas Governor Asks Legislators To Revisit 'Religious Freedom' Bill

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:00 pm

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson told state lawmakers Wednesday they should either amend or recall a bill that's dubbed a "religious freedom" measure. The governor changed his stance after the business community and gay rights activists complained about the measure.

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Shots - Health News
4:35 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Trading Walkathons For Ice Buckets, Charities Try To Hold On To Donors

A big crowd turned out for the March of Dimes walkathon in Gainesville, Fla., in early March. But overall, the March of Dimes' March for Babies raised $3.5 million less in 2014 than it did the year before.
Elizabeth Hamilton Gainesville Sun/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 11:43 am

Springtime means outdoor charity events, and there are plenty to choose from.

You can walk, run, bike, swim or even roll around in the mud to raise money for a cause. But some of the bigger, more established events aren't doing as well as they used to, and charities are trying to adjust.

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Environment
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

California Governor Announces First Ever Mandatory Water Restrictions

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Republicans Face Backlash Over Indiana, Arkansas 'Religious Freedom' Laws

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Health
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Arizona Requires Doctors To Say Abortion Pill Is Reversible

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Arizona will now require doctors to tell women who use the so-called abortion pill that the procedure can be reversed. We asked NPR health correspondent Rob Stein whether that's true. Here's his report.

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Around the Nation
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Police, Civilians Navigate Tense Relationship On LA's Skid Row

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Navajos Fight Their Food Desert With Junk Food And Soda Taxes

A price comparison of Spam and fresh fruit in a grocery store in Navajo Nation. According to the DinΓ© Community Advocacy Alliance, the vast majority of the inventory at reservation stores would be considered "junk food" under the new tax law.
Courtesy of Denisa Livingston

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 4:57 pm

More than 30 cities and states across the country have attempted to tax soda. Nearly all have failed.

Now, a community of about 250,000 people has found a way to tax not just sugary beverages, but also junk food. At the same time, it's making fresh produce more affordable in one of the hardest regions in the U.S. to buy it.

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The Salt
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

With Nostalgia And A Last Nosh, 1 Of 3 Remaining HoJo's Closes

A vintage postcard (circa 1930-1945) shows the HoJo's on U.S. Alternate Route I, in Fredericksburg, Va.
Boston Public Library/Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:55 pm

In the 1960s and '70s, Howard Johnson's restaurants were the biggest chain in the country, with more than 1,000 locations.

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Politics
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Margaret Hamburg Ends Six-Year Run As FDA Commissioner

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:00 pm

Margaret Hamburg ended her run this week as one of the longest serving Food and Drug Administration commissioners in recent decades. NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with her about her accomplishments and challenges while in office.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Health
4:32 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Germanwings Crash Highlights Workplace Approaches To Mental Health

When it comes to an employee's mental health status, what does an employer need to know, or have a right to know?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 2:12 pm

The horrifying crash last week of the Germanwings flight operated by Lufthansa has put a spotlight on what the airline knew β€” and what it should, or could have done β€” about its pilot's mental health.

Lufthansa could face unlimited liability, after the pilot allegedly brought the plane down deliberately. Here in the U.S., employment experts say monitoring employees' mental health status raises a thicket of complicated issues.

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Goats and Soda
3:41 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

A Virus In Your Mouth Helps Fight The Flu

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 6:07 pm

Hidden inside all of us are likely thousands of viruses β€” maybe more. They just hang out, harmlessly. We don't even know they're there.

But every once in a while, one of these viral inhabitants might help us out.

Young people infected with a type of herpes virus have a better immune response to the flu vaccine than those not infected, scientists at Stanford University report Wednesday. In mice, the virus directly stops influenza itself.

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