National

Around the Nation
5:20 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Homeless Rural Vets Find A Place To Call Home

American Legion Post Cmdr. Mark Czmyr and his father, Navy veteran William Czmyr, originated the idea to create permanent apartments for homeless vets in Jewett City, Conn.
Lucy Nalpathanchil for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own, thanks to the American Legion.

The organization's post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional but permanent supportive housing in their rural community.

For 55-year-old Army veteran Jeff MacDonald, the new facility in Jewett City, Conn., was like "winning the lottery."

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:32 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

City Sounds: Saxophone Under A Chicago Bridge

As part of the NPR Cities Project, we'll be hearing from listeners about their own cities. Find out how to submit photos and sound at npr.org/nprcities. In this edition, we have the sound of a lonely saxophone under the Michigan Avenue Bridge in Chicago.

Around the Nation
4:31 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Parts Of W.Va. Still In The Dark 12 Days After Storm

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Twelve days and counting, that's how long some people in West Virginia have been without power since a massive storm blitzed the eastern United States. At the height of the outages, more than four million people had no electricity. Most are back online but 35,000 people are still waiting.

Here's Jessica Lilly of West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

JESSICA LILLY, BYLINE: At Ansted Baptist Church in Fayette County, Joann Brewer and her grandkids have come here not for the Gospel but food and ice.

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Education
4:30 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Struggling Michigan City Privatizes Public Schools

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:13 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A small public school district is about to go private. The emergency manager for schools in Muskegon Heights, in western Michigan, is turning the entire system over to a charter school operator.

And as Lindsey Smith of Michigan Radio reports, that's already a model for the state's other financially-troubled districts.

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The Salt
3:58 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Cranberry Juice For Urinary Tract Infections? It Really Can Help

Cranberry Antioxidant Punch
Maggie Starbard NPR

Native Americans and Pilgrims were onto something when they turned to cranberries as an infection fighter. American settlers believed the bitter food could stave off scurvy. But there's more than just Vitamin C in this indigenous berry.

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Poverty In America
3:52 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 2:54 pm


Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:43 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Justice Delayed: After Three Decades, An Apology

Kirk Odom and his wife, Harriet, outside the H. Carl Moultrie Courthouse in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the Justice Department said there was "clear and convincing evidence" that Odom is innocent of a 1981 rape and robbery, for which he spent more than two decades behind bars.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

Nearly 31 years after he was convicted of rape and armed robbery, Kirk Odom on Tuesday all but won his fight to be declared an innocent man.

The Justice Department filed court papers saying, "There is clear and convincing evidence that Mr. Odom is innocent of the charges for which he was convicted," and apologized for the "terrible injustice."

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Poverty In America
3:42 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Cycle Of Poverty Hard To Break In Poorest U.S. City

Devora Trapp, 24, picks up her 8-month-old son, Dardarius Taylor, late one evening at the Opportunity House's Second Street Learning Center, a 24-hour day care center for low-income families in Reading, Pa.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 11:31 pm

In the middle of the night, most children are home in bed. But at the Second Street Learning Center in Reading, Pa., a half-dozen tiny bodies are curled up on green plastic floor mats, fast asleep.

Conversations are hushed. The lights are dim. At 1:30 a.m., day care worker Virginia Allen gently shakes two little sisters, snuggled under the same blanket, to tell them that their mother is there to pick them up.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:01 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

When Does An App Need FDA's Blessing?

Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

Bernard Farrell obsesses over every bite he eats, every minute of exercise he gets, and everything that stresses him out. And, more than anything else, Farrell obsesses over his blood sugar.

He has to. Farrell, 55, has Type 1 diabetes.

"Pretty much everything affects our blood sugar," says Farrell, of Littleton, Mass.

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Around the Nation
2:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Intense Heat Has Lasting Impact Across U.S.

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 3:10 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Heat in the summertime is usually not news, but this year is more than a little out of the ordinary. The first six months of 2012 is already on the books as the warmest half-year on record according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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The Salt
2:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

The Importance Of Making Sushi And Mozzarella On Mars

Rupert Spies, Senior Lecturer in Food and Beverage Management at Cornell, gives a hands-on workshop on bread making with the NASA team.
Jason Koski courtesy of Cornell University Photography

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 2:31 pm

You might be surprised at how powdered milk, dehydrated kelp and shelf-stable chorizo can come together in ways that taste good — especially if you've been cooped up for a few months on a mission with five strangers on a desolate lava crater in Hawaii.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:05 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

CDC Now Has Tips For Surviving A Wedding

"Bridezilla" or tornado?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 3:31 pm

If you're planning a wedding, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has some advice for you. Really.

Leave it to the public health gurus to turn a day that's supposed to be one of the happiest in people's lives into a lesson in preparing for a real-life nightmare.

Just check out the "CDC's Wedding Day Survival Guide," featuring tips like this:

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Around the Nation
12:42 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Chicago Killings Spark Outrage

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

We turn now to another story that's making headlines for all the wrong reasons. It's been a bloody year in the Windy City. More than 250 people have reportedly been murdered so far this year in Chicago. That number is up about 38 percent from the same time last year, and now people are asking just what Mayor Rahm Emanuel is doing about it.

He faced reporters yesterday and said some of the old plans to stop violence weren't working now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Health Care
12:42 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Miss. Rep: Abortion Clinic Regulation Protects Women

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

I'm Maria Hinojosa, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we look at a growing trend: moms starting their own businesses. It can come with more flexibility, but there are also emotional and financial risks. We talk to a group of mom-preneurs, and that's just ahead.

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Health Care
12:42 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

'Unconstitutional' Miss. Abortion Law Has To Go

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

We turn now to Nancy Northup. She's the president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, which is representing the Jackson Women's Health Organization in court. This is the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, and it might have to close its doors if a new law there is upheld. If it closes, Mississippi would be the only state with no working abortion clinic. She joins me from her office in New York City. Nancy, welcome to TELL ME MORE.

NANCY NORTHUP: Thank you.

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