National

Around the Nation
6:32 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Seals Lure Sharks To Summer At Cape Cod

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is the season when thousands of visitors head for Cape Cod, that arm of land bent at the elbow sticking out from the coast of Massachusetts. Mostly, the visitors are good for business, but a particular kind of visitor is causing trouble for all the others. Great white sharks have been infiltrating the local waters during the high season. Here's Brian Morris of member station WCAI.

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NPR Story
5:39 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Phillies' Ballpark Offers Best Vegetarian Delights

They may not be having a great season on the baseball diamond, but the Philadelphia Phillies are in first place with the group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. PETA says Citizens Bank Park has the best vegetarian choices.

NPR Story
5:09 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Google Expected To Pay Fine In Privacy Setting Case

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. Google and the Federal Trade Commission are near a deal that could result the largest fine for privacy violations ever imposed by that agency.

NPR's Steve Henn has the story.

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Science
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Researchers Take Stock Of 2011 Weather

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 6:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across America people are sweltering through extreme heat this year, continuing a long-term trend of rising temperatures. Inevitably, many are wondering if the scorching heat is due to global warming. Scientists are expected to dig into the data and grapple with that in the months to come. They've already taken a stab at a possible connection with last year's extreme weather events, like the blistering drought in Texas. NPR's Richard Harris reports.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
3:23 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Women's Field Hockey Aims To End Olympic Drought

Paige Selenski (right) of the United States fights for the ball against two Mexican opponents in a women's field hockey match at last October's Pan American Games in Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:45 am

As one of the world's most popular sports, field hockey produces celebrities in Argentina, the Netherlands and Australia. But the sport is relatively obscure in the United States, where members of the women's national team receive a small monthly stipend and their notoriety comes from outside the country.

Later this month, the group heads to London, where it will try to earn the first American medal in the sport in 28 years.

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Energy
6:34 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Oil Company Knew Michigan Pipeline Was Cracked

Workers in Battle Creek, Mich., use suction hoses to try to clean up an 800,000-gallon oil spill in the Kalamazoo River in July 2010.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:45 pm

Two years ago this month, an oil pipeline burst in Michigan, contaminating 38 miles of the Kalamazoo River. It didn't get much national notice because everyone was focused on the massive BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

But the mess created by that Michigan spill was so great that it's become the costliest onshore spill in history — with a price tag of more than $800 million. On Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board blamed the spill on the failure of the pipeline operator, Enbridge Inc., to follow its own safety rules.

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Around the Nation
6:21 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Tensions Rise With Plan To Flood Grand Canyon

Power companies say the last high flow through the Glen Canyon Dam, in 2008, cost almost $4 million in lost revenue.
Courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 9:56 pm

The Colorado River is about to run wild through the Grand Canyon again — at least a couple of times a year.

For almost five decades, the Glen Canyon Dam on the mighty Colorado in northern Arizona has caused many of the beaches downriver to slowly erode. Many have disappeared altogether.

The Interior Department hopes to change that. Earlier this year, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar approved a series of simulated floods that will release huge amounts of water and sediment from the Glen Canyon Dam.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
5:49 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Moving Buildings To Save D.C.'s Historic Foundation

With the old buildings out of the way, construction will begin on a huge glass-clad office building for the Association of American Medical Colleges. The 11-story-tall building will cost more than $200 million and incorporate the historic buildings.
Franklyn Cater NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 10:06 pm

K Street may be synonymous with Washington, D.C.'s thriving lobbying industry, but for decades, K Street between 6th and 7th streets NW has been a dilapidated city block of 19th and early 20th century brick buildings. In recent months, staffers at NPR have witnessed the transformation of the entire city block, located behind NPR's Washington headquarters.

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Around the Nation
5:20 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Homeless Rural Vets Find A Place To Call Home

American Legion Post Cmdr. Mark Czmyr and his father, Navy veteran William Czmyr, originated the idea to create permanent apartments for homeless vets in Jewett City, Conn.
Lucy Nalpathanchil for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own, thanks to the American Legion.

The organization's post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional but permanent supportive housing in their rural community.

For 55-year-old Army veteran Jeff MacDonald, the new facility in Jewett City, Conn., was like "winning the lottery."

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:32 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

City Sounds: Saxophone Under A Chicago Bridge

As part of the NPR Cities Project, we'll be hearing from listeners about their own cities. Find out how to submit photos and sound at npr.org/nprcities. In this edition, we have the sound of a lonely saxophone under the Michigan Avenue Bridge in Chicago.

Around the Nation
4:31 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Parts Of W.Va. Still In The Dark 12 Days After Storm

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Twelve days and counting, that's how long some people in West Virginia have been without power since a massive storm blitzed the eastern United States. At the height of the outages, more than four million people had no electricity. Most are back online but 35,000 people are still waiting.

Here's Jessica Lilly of West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

JESSICA LILLY, BYLINE: At Ansted Baptist Church in Fayette County, Joann Brewer and her grandkids have come here not for the Gospel but food and ice.

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Education
4:30 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Struggling Michigan City Privatizes Public Schools

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:13 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A small public school district is about to go private. The emergency manager for schools in Muskegon Heights, in western Michigan, is turning the entire system over to a charter school operator.

And as Lindsey Smith of Michigan Radio reports, that's already a model for the state's other financially-troubled districts.

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The Salt
3:58 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Cranberry Juice For Urinary Tract Infections? It Really Can Help

Cranberry Antioxidant Punch
Maggie Starbard NPR

Native Americans and Pilgrims were onto something when they turned to cranberries as an infection fighter. American settlers believed the bitter food could stave off scurvy. But there's more than just Vitamin C in this indigenous berry.

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Poverty In America
3:52 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 2:54 pm


Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:43 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Justice Delayed: After Three Decades, An Apology

Kirk Odom and his wife, Harriet, outside the H. Carl Moultrie Courthouse in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the Justice Department said there was "clear and convincing evidence" that Odom is innocent of a 1981 rape and robbery, for which he spent more than two decades behind bars.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:34 pm

Nearly 31 years after he was convicted of rape and armed robbery, Kirk Odom on Tuesday all but won his fight to be declared an innocent man.

The Justice Department filed court papers saying, "There is clear and convincing evidence that Mr. Odom is innocent of the charges for which he was convicted," and apologized for the "terrible injustice."

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