National

NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:33 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Filling In New Orleans' Future, One Blank At A Time

Candy Chang, co-founder of the website Neighborland, writes on an art installation in New Orleans in April. As part of a public street art project that later became Neighborland, Chang put nametag-like stickers on empty New Orleans storefronts for residents to write ideas for improving the city.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:19 pm

New Orleans became a blank slate after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005. And ever since, entrepreneurs have rushed in to experiment with new ideas for building and running a city.

Among them is a startup called Neighborland.com, a social media tool for sharing ideas to make your neighborhood better. After signing in to Neighborland, you can find your neighborhood and post your idea. The posts all start with "I want," and you fill in the rest.

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Business
4:33 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

As Strikes Wane, Caterpillar Workers Hold The Line

Striking workers picket outside a Caterpillar plant in Joliet, Ill. The work stoppage is now entering its third month.
Joseph P. Meier Sun-Times Media Photo

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:35 pm

Whenever a car or truck turns off busy Channahon Road onto the long drive to the Caterpillar plant in Joliet, Ill., a handful of union workers on a picket line scream, "Scab! Scab!!"

As strikers try shaming the few workers and managers who cross the line, even a clearly marked sandwich delivery car gets shouted down.

Approximately 800 workers at this plant, which makes hydraulic systems for Caterpillar's heavy construction and mining equipment, are about to enter their third month on strike.

Negotiations Fail

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Sports
3:27 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

1500 Meters US Champion On Humble Beginnings

Leonel Manzano leads Matthew Centrowitz to the finish in the men's 1500 meter final at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials Sunday, July 1, 2012, in Eugene, Ore. Manzano came in first and Centrowitz crossed second. Both made the Olympic team. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:54 pm

Leonel Manzano is the new U.S. track and field champion in the men's 1500 meters. He took home the title on Sunday night, and booked his place on the 2012 U.S. Olympic team. As part of Tell Me More's preview of the Summer Olympics, host Michel Martin speaks with Manzano about his humble beginnings in Mexico.

The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Gatorade And Cheetos: Blackout In Small-Town West Virginia

Members of the Williamsburg Volunteer Fire Department were unable to find fuel at a station in Crawley, W.Va. Elsewhere, people waited in line for hours for the chance to fill up.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:28 pm

People who show up at the Shell station in Crawley, W.Va., hoping to find ice, water or a working bathroom are out of luck. With no power to work the pumps, there's no hope of buying gas, either.

Still, a steady stream of customers arrived at the station Sunday evening, picking up snack cakes and 12-packs of Bud Light. A couple of women left the food store with little kids in tow holding Gatorade and Cheetos, which seems like a suitable supper when the food in your home freezer has started to go bad.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:59 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Glaxo To Plead Guilty To 3 Charges In Sweeping Health Settlement

GlaxoSmithKline's mishandling of information on safety problems with diabetes drug Avandia is just one of the violations cited in a settlement with the government.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:15 am

If you've grown numb to the federal fraud charges settled by drugmakers one after another, shake it off and take note of today's huge settlement by GlaxoSmithKline.

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Health Care
11:55 am
Mon July 2, 2012

How Will Health Care Decision Affect Doctors?

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:40 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Leo Manzano came from behind to win the 1500 meters track and field national championship last night and with it he booked his place on the U.S. Olympic team. We'll hear how Manzano went from living in a Mexican village with no running water to running for the red, white and blue.

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Health Care
11:55 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Doctors On Effects Of Supreme Court Decision

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:40 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're continuing our conversation with a roundtable of doctors, checking in with them about their thoughts about the Affordable Care Act in the wake of the Supreme Court decision to uphold most of the provisions of the act.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Word Of The Day: 'Derecho'

Where you're most likely to be in the path of a derecho, and how often.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:35 pm

We learned a new word on Saturday, thanks to Korva's post about the devastating storm that has left millions without power from Ohio east through the mid-Atlantic states:

Derecho.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Finally, 'Some Good News' About Colorado Springs Wildfire

On Sunday in Colorado Springs, residents waited for word about whether their homes had survived the Waldo Canyon wildfire.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

As we said earlier, millions of people in mid-Atlantic states and Ohio are starting a third day without power because of damage from Friday's "land hurricane."

But in Colorado Springs, "it's nice to finally have some good news," Steve Cox, chief of economic vitality and innovation for the city, tells the local Gazette.

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Art Thief Returns Stolen Salvador Dali Drawing

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Two-Way
7:26 am
Mon July 2, 2012

No Power? No A.C.? You Don't Have To Tell Us About It (But We Hope You Do)

Sign of the times: In Bethesda, Md., a Starbucks breaks some bad news. Ice is in short supply in many places where the power is out.
Allison Shelley Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 2:49 pm

For about 2.7 million people across mid-Atlantic and west to Ohio it's Day 3 without power.

Friday's "land hurricane" — technically known as a derecho — may be long gone, but it is certainly not forgotten. Crews, many brought in from states well outside the affected region, continue to work on restoring power. But utilities are warning it could be next weekend before everyone is back on the grid.

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Around the Nation
7:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Daredevils Try Out Adult-Size Hot Wheels Track

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Hot Wheels and their twisty plastic tracks have long been a source of small scale thrills. But on Saturday, daredevils Tanner Foust and Greg Tracy went behind the miniature. They raced two rally cars around a 66-foot tall version of a Hot Wheels loop-de-loop racetrack. Seven times gravity was the hardest part. The only thing broken was a world record. Don't try this at home. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
4:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Samsung's Galaxy S3 Sets A Marker For The iPhone

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

In the world of smartphones, Apple and Samsung have been going head to head. And the competition could get rougher. Samsung has launched the Galaxy S3 in the U.S., and it could be a serious threat to the iPhone. Linda Wertheimer talks to Bloomberg technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky about the latest in the smartphone battle between Samsung and Apple.

Around the Nation
4:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Fly Fishermen Benefit From Low Stream Levels

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

One of Colorado's recreational industries is experiencing an early season boon because of this year's low snowpack and ever-worsening drought. Fly fishing enthusiasts are loving the low stream levels, and fly shops are filled with customers. From Aspen Public Radio, Luke Runyon reports.

Health Care
4:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Mississippi Reluctant To Expand Medicaid Eligibility

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

WERTHEIMER: Now that the Supreme Court has upheld most of the health care law, the Affordable Care Act, the action turns to the states.

Each state has two big tasks: first is deciding whether to take federal money to expand Medicaid.

MONTAGNE: States are supposed to provide Medicaid to a larger base: people making incomes up to 133 percent of the poverty level, just under $15,000 a year.

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