National

Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life.
Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 1:01 pm

Many scientists are failing to live up to a 2007 law that requires them to report the results of their clinical trials to a public website, according to a study in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 11:08 am

Leon Richardson is 18 years old and tall, charismatic and thoughtful about his sexual health.

He understands that as a young, gay black man, he is in the demographic with the highest rate of HIV infections in the country. But when Richardson learned that he could be part of an HIV prevention pill research study for young people, he was skeptical.

"I was scared. I had to really think about it, 'What is this drug going to do to me?' " he says.

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The Salt
5:57 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why Some Schools Serve Local Food And Others Can't (Or Won't)

A lunch served by the Yarmouth, Maine, School Department on Sept. 26, 2014, featured Sloppy Joe's made with Maine beef and local beets, carrots, apples and potato salad. More than 80 percent of Maine schools said they served local foods in a survey conducted by the USDA.
U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:23 pm

For many years, if a public school district wanted to serve students apples or milk from local farmers, it could face all kinds of hurdles. Schools were locked into strict contracts with distributors, few of whom saw any reason to start bringing in local products. Those contracts also often precluded schools from working directly with local farmers.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Resigns Following Justice Department Report

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Thomas Jackson is resigning after a scathing Justice Department report showed racial bias in the department and the city's courts.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:31 pm

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down in the wake of a scathing Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias, Mayor James Knowles said at a news conference Wednesday.

Knowles called Chief Thomas Jackson's departure "a mutual separation, which involves the police chief's resignation from the city of Ferguson."

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Around the Nation
4:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Investigation Continues Into Crash Of Blackhawk Military Helicopter In Fla.

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

New Transmission Line To Carry Wind Energy Not Met With Open Arms

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Tension From Utility Companies Casts A Shadow On Rooftop Solar Industry

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

States Scramble To Deal With Shortages Of Execution Drugs

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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National Security
4:36 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

As Clinton Defends Email Policy, Department IG Finds Flaws

Then-U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (center) types on her cellphone with Roberta S. Jacobson, U.S. assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere Affairs (left), and U.S. Ambassador to Brazil Thomas Shannon in Brasilia, Brazil, before heading to Brussels in 2012.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 10:29 am

A day after Hillary Clinton's explanation of her use of a private email account while secretary of state, a State Department watchdog reported that only a fraction of the department's emails have been preserved. The Inspector General's report says that of the 1 billion emails sent by State Department employees in 2011, just over 61,000 were kept.

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Code Switch
3:08 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Claude Sitton, 'Dean Of The Race Beat,' Dies At 89

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 5:56 pm

It may be that Claude Fox Sitton so outraged the white Southern segregationists he reported on throughout the civil rights movement because, by all appearances, he could have been standing beside them instead of writing about them in the New York Times.

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Science
3:02 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Think Man-Sized Swimming Centipede — And Be Glad It's A Fossil

Reconstruction of the giant filter feeder, scooping up a plankton cloud. Aegirocassis benmoulae was one of the biggest arthropods that ever lived. Family members include today's insects, spiders and lobsters.
Marianne Collins/ArtofFact

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:40 pm

If living long and prospering is a measure of success, then the arthropods are life's winners. These are the most common form of life: insects, spiders, crustaceans and centipedes, to name but a few.

And now scientists have their hands on the remains of one of the first ever. It lived 480 million years ago, and it was big and strange.

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Goats and Soda
2:28 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

He's 14. He Was A Child Soldier. He's Suicidal. How Can He Be Saved?

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 5:35 pm

The boy was abducted by the Lord's Liberation Army to serve as a child soldier when he was 7. He had been forced to kill his uncle with a machete.

At 14, he escaped and made his way back to his parents. But he wasn't himself.

He couldn't sleep at night, and during the day, he'd run around the village screaming. He was fighting back thoughts of suicide.

"No one knew what to do with him," says Peter Oketayot, a mental health counselor with the nonprofit Vivo in Northern Uganda, who eventually treated the teenager.

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Monkey See
1:33 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

A Travel Show For Your Favorite Weird-Museum And Dance Enthusiast

Courtesy of Ovation

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 4:23 pm

When we get to talking about HBO and Sling, about cord-cutting and the future of television, we tend to focus on the advantages of being able to pick out only the core channels you watch most; the ones you know you love. Now and then, though, I'm glad for the vast array of channels that are trying different things with different people, serving audiences smaller than the ones for football and Cutthroat Kitchen.

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Shots - Health News
12:37 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

The Boss Can Force You To Buy Company's Health Insurance

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 11:09 am

Under the health law, large employers that don't offer their full-time workers comprehensive, affordable health insurance face a fine. But some employers are taking it a step further and requiring workers to buy the company insurance, whether they want it or not.

Many workers may have no choice but to comply.

Some workers are upset. One disgruntled reader wrote to Kaiser Health News: "My employer is requiring me to purchase health insurance and is automatically taking the premium out of my paycheck even though I don't want to sign up for health insurance. Is this legal?"

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The Salt
11:12 am
Wed March 11, 2015

How Big Sugar Steered Research On A 'Tooth Decay Vaccine'

Garry Gay Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 3:18 pm

Sugar can promote tooth decay. Duh.

So if you want good oral health, it makes sense to brush and floss regularly and perhaps limit the amount of sugar you consume. Right?

In 2015, this may seem fairly obvious.

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Shots - Health News
10:45 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Documents Detail Sugar Industry Efforts To Direct Medical Research

Pink Sherbert Photography/Flickr

Back in 2007, Christin Kearns attended a conference for dentists like herself to learn about links between diabetes and gum disease.

She was handed a government pamphlet titled, "How to Talk to Patients about Diabetes," and was surprised to find that the diet advice didn't mention reducing sugar intake. She said it made her wonder if the sugar industry "somehow impacted what the government can or cannot say about diet advice for diabetics?"

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Monkey See
9:54 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour, Small Batch Edition: 'King Of The Nerds'

Raychelle, Ben, Lily and Kaitlin are among the nerds in tight competition on TBS's King Of The Nerds.
Trae Patton TBS

In something of a companion piece to our earlier segment on nerd culture, Stephen and Glen sit down in this edition to chat about the social dynamics at work and at play on TBS's surprisingly charming competition show King Of The Nerds. Glen carefully distinguishes it from its predecessor Beauty And The Geek, then wonders whether when nerds act like reality show contestants, they're using the tactics of the enemy.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Happy World Plumbing Day! We Celebrate By Interviewing ... A Plumber

Fred Schilling has made many trips to Haiti to fix pipes and train Haitians.
Courtesy of Plumbers Without Borders

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 5:21 pm

After a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, help poured in from the U.S. Doctors came to battle the cholera epidemic, agencies handed out food, and nonprofits provided shelter.

And then there were plumbers.

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Around the Nation
7:00 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Lost Love Letter Resurfaces After 70 Years

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
6:32 am
Wed March 11, 2015

D.C. Court Orders Row House Resident Not To Smoke

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
5:10 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Caddies File $50 Million Class-Action Lawsuit Against PGA Tour

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
5:05 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Fla. Gov. Scott Denies 'Climate Change' Is A Banned Term

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
5:03 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Defense Looks For Ways To Make Admitted Boston Bomber More Sympathetic

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
5:02 am
Wed March 11, 2015

In Retrospect, Clinton Says She Should Have Used Separate Emails

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 4:46 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Wed March 11, 2015

9 Iraqi Interpreters Sue U.S. Government Over Visa Delays

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:38 pm

During a decade of war, U.S. troops relied on interpreters — thousands of Iraqis and Afghans — who worked and often fought alongside Americans.

Many of them were promised visas to the U.S. but they have been waiting for years with no answer. Now, nine Iraqis are suing the U.S. government to get their status resolved.

All the Iraqis in the lawsuit go by code names because of ongoing threats to their lives.

Plaintiff Alpha was in an ambush with U.S. troops and got shot in the back, but he continued to work with the U.S. military after he recovered.

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Critics Take Aim At Port Of Seattle's Lease With Shell Oil

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 Puget Sound Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kuow.org.

Back At Base
3:43 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Veterans Choice Act Fails To Ease Travel Burdens For Vets In Need Of Care

While the Veterans Choice Act seems simple, making it work hasn't been as easy.

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 11:27 am

Veterans who need to see a doctor often have to travel long distances – 40 miles or more – to get to a Department of Veterans Affairs facility. So last year, after scandals involving long wait times for vets, Congress tried to make getting care easier.

The Veterans Choice Act gives veterans the option of using a doctor outside the VA system if VA facilities are more than 40 miles away, or there's more than a 30-day wait for an appointment.

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Economy
3:39 am
Wed March 11, 2015

With Prices Down And Layoffs Up, Copper Industry Still Looks To Grow

A driver operates a haul truck in the Ray Mine near Kearny, Ariz. Falling copper prices have residents of some small mining towns in Arizona worried as shrinking revenues bring layoffs.
Christopher Deahr FlickrVision

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:41 am

The price of copper is down more than 40 percent from its peak just four years ago. Some of that is due to a drop-off in construction activity in the United States and China. The trend has some small mining towns in Arizona worried as shrinking revenues are starting to translate into layoffs.

It's hard to miss the Ray Mine near Kearny in southern Arizona. The open-pit copper mine spans nearly two square miles and extends more than 1,000 feet into the ground.

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Shots - Health News
3:36 am
Wed March 11, 2015

States Aim To Restrict Medically Induced Abortions

A view of the eastern entrance to the Ohio Statehouse.
Bob Hall/Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:08 pm

Of the million or so women who have abortions every year in the U.S., nearly a quarter end their pregnancy using medications. But just as states have been passing a record number of restrictions on surgical abortion, more are trying to limit this option as well.

One of the country's strictest laws is in Ohio. To understand it, a little history helps.

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The Two-Way
9:04 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Ferguson, Mo., City Manager Out Amid Shakeup

The Ferguson, Mo., City Council removed John Shaw as city manager today following last week's U.S. Justice Department report that accused the local police and justice system of racial bias.

Jason Rosenbaum, a reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, tweeted the news of the City Council resolution that removed Shaw from his position.

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