National

All Tech Considered
4:20 am
Mon April 6, 2015

Is Cash-Free Really The Way To Be? Maybe Not For Millennials

More Americans are ditching traditional cash and plastic, opting instead for new mobile payment applications. But new research indicates cash isn't completely dead.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 6:20 pm

Smartphones have new, seamless ways to purchase stuff lightning fast, with just a tap. With these new digital technologies available for mobile payment, many young people are ditching cash and plastic altogether.

But is traditional payment dead? According to Doug Conover, an analyst with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, not exactly.

"The perception that young people rarely use cash is just not correct," he says.

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Religion
5:08 pm
Sun April 5, 2015

Community Takes Passover Tradition Back To The Desert Wilderness

Wilderness Torah festival attendees take their Shabbat celebration outside the Tent of Meeting (at left) as the sun sets in the Panamint Valley of the Mojave Desert in 2014. At center in white, with both arms reaching up to the sky, is singer-songwriter Mikey Pauker. Shabbat participants are singing, drumming and playing guitars.
Tom Levy

Originally published on Sun April 5, 2015 9:12 pm

It's Passover and as is traditional, many Jews are eating matzo for the week. But in Southern California, a group called Wilderness Torah is not only reflecting on the Passover story but going into the desert to relive part of it.

About 150 people are gathered around an outdoor fire. In the expanse of a vast desert night, they sing a soulful Jewish tune. They're here to remember the Passover story, in which the Israelites were slaves in Egypt before they crossed the Red Sea into the desert.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Sun April 5, 2015

Puberty Suppression Now A Choice For Teens On Medicaid In Oregon

Michaela leans on her mother, Dee, while talking to Dr. Karin Selva about puberty suppression.
Kristian Foden-Vencil Oregon Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 8:33 am

Michael was born biologically male 13 years ago on the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation.

Mom, Dee, remembers buying dresses for three nieces when Michael — who now goes by Michaela — was about 6 years old.

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Shots - Health News
9:54 am
Sun April 5, 2015

In Rural Virginia, Truckers Can Stop For Coffee And A Physical

Crystal Groah holds four-month-old son Brently while Dr. Rob Marsh examines him. He and his twin sister Savannah were premature at birth, but with care from Marsh both are doing well.
Sandy Hausman/WVTF

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 5:00 pm

Rob Marsh has a medical practice in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. He likes the freedom to open his office at night if a patient gets sick.

Marsh wants to make house calls, and he needs to pay a staff that has grown from 2 to 23. But many people in this area lack insurance.

"You've got to make budget to make payroll," he says.

The financial pressures of practicing medicine in the 21st century have led more doctors to take jobs with large hospitals and medical practices. Last year, only 17 percent of doctors were in solo practice.

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Around the Nation
8:33 am
Sun April 5, 2015

Millions At Stake In California Tribe Membership Dispute

Originally published on Sun April 5, 2015 11:19 am

Copyright 2015 Valley Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kvpr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
8:33 am
Sun April 5, 2015

In New York, A Sculptor's Got Some S'plaining To Do

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 9:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
7:03 am
Sun April 5, 2015

Drinking With 'Mad Men': Cocktail Culture And The Myth Of Don Draper

Megan Draper (Jessica Pare) and Don Draper (Jon Hamm) raise their glasses. Many fans have been inspired to do the same, but Mad Men has a complicated relationship with alcohol.
Michael Yarish AMC

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 4:51 pm

Ah, 2007: the year in which we met the first-ever iPhone, a presidential candidate called Barack Obama ... and an inscrutable ad man named Don Draper.

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Around the Nation
5:19 am
Sun April 5, 2015

What You Didn't Know About What You Already Know About Easter

Employee Sandra Jaeckel adjusts a ribbon around the neck of a giant chocolate Easter bunny at the production facility of Confiserie Felicitas chocolates maker in Hornow, Germany, in 2014.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 5:34 pm

Through centuries and across cultures, the holiday's iconic customs have been built upon with the help of storytelling. And the cotton-tailed creature that leaves us chocolate and eggs has a longer tale.

1. Pagan Beginnings

The story of Easter is as much rooted in paganism as it is in Christianity. The holiday owes its name to Eostra, the Germanic goddess of spring and fertility.

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Shots - Health News
6:25 pm
Sat April 4, 2015

When It Comes To Insurance, Mental Health Parity In Name Only?

Mental health care advocates say patients face challenges in insurance coverage.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 4:02 pm

By law, many U.S. insurance providers that offer mental health care are required to cover it just as they would cancer or diabetes care. But advocates say achieving this mental health parity can be a challenge.

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Health
5:30 pm
Sat April 4, 2015

Improving Mental Health Via Social Network

Originally published on Sat April 4, 2015 6:25 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Sat April 4, 2015

Owner Of 'Revenge Porn' Site Sentenced To 18 Years In Jail

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 9:50 am

A man in San Diego who ran a so-called "revenge porn" site that charged hundreds of dollars to remove anonymously posted nude photos has been sentenced to 18 years in prison after his conviction on 21 counts of identity theft and six counts of extortion.

Kevin Bollaert, 28, ran the sites UGotPosted.com and ChangeMyReputation.com.

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Sat April 4, 2015

In Kentucky, Rescuers Scramble To Reach People Trapped By Flash Floods

Simone Wester and her 7-month old son Jeremiah walk through the flood waters outside her apartment building at the Guardian Court Apartments in Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday.
Timothy D. Easley AP

Rescuers in north and central Kentucky were trying to reach people trapped by a sudden flash flood that followed torrential downpours on Thursday and Friday.

In Lee County, about 50 miles southeast of Lexington, authorities were searching for a mother and daughter swept away as rescue workers were trying to reach them, The Associated Press reports. It was one of about 160 rescues prompted by the heavy rainfall, the AP says.

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Code Switch
9:20 am
Sat April 4, 2015

The Time Coca-Cola Got White Elites in Atlanta to Honor Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in Norway in 1964. In King's hometown of Atlanta, social conservatives at first refused to attend an integrated dinner in his honor.
AP

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 11:54 am

Wal-Mart, Apple, Angie's List, NASCAR — some of the biggest names in business this week pushed back against "religious freedom" laws in Indiana and Arkansas. They said the laws could open the door to discrimination against gays and lesbians and were bad for their business.

Such corporate intervention is not new.

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Book News & Features
8:18 am
Sat April 4, 2015

'So That Happened': Confessions Of A Duck-Man

Warner Bros. TV/Chuck Lorre Prod. The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 10:00 am

In the John Hughes-penned classic, Pretty in Pink, Jon Cryer's "Duckie" Dale has one of the best on-screen friendships in '80s teen movie history.

Unfortunately, he's also in love with that friend — his best friend — Andie, played by Molly Ringwald. She's about to date a rich kid, Andrew McCarthy's Blane, much to Duckie's disappointment.

Their fight, a climactic movie moment, only shows how much they care about each other. "You can't do this and respect yourself. You can't," Duckie insists to Andie.

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The Salt
7:33 am
Sat April 4, 2015

Why Wal-Mart Is Betting Big On Being Your Local Urban Grocer

A customer shops for groceries with her son at the Wal-Mart on H Street in Washington, D.C.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 6:16 pm

Wal-Mart made its name by going big: massive super centers with gallon jars of pickles and rows and rows of lawn chairs and tires.

Its future may depend a lot on going small. It's investing in smaller stores in densely populated urban neighborhoods, where customers buy fewer items at a time.

Customers like Donna Thomas, who walked over to a Wal-Mart near Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on her lunch break from her job as an executive assistant at Comcast.

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Code Switch
5:25 am
Sat April 4, 2015

In Freedom Seder, Jews And African-Americans Built A Tradition Together

Rev. Channing E. Phillips, (left) Rabbi Arthur Waskow, and Topper Carew on April 4, 1969, the night of the first Freedom Seder.
Courtesy of Arthur Waskow

Originally published on Sat April 4, 2015 10:30 am

Friday night marked the start of Passover, when Jews around the world tell the story of Exodus. That story, with its radical message of freedom, has resonated with African-Americans since the days of slavery.

More than 40 years ago, these two communities wove their stories together for a new Passover ritual — the Freedom Seder.

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U.S.
4:47 am
Sat April 4, 2015

Despite Laws And Lawsuits, Quota-Based Policing Lingers

Multiple lawsuits accuse the New York City Police Department of pressuring officers into fulfilling monthly quotes for tickets and arrests, resulting in warrantless stops. The NYPD denies the allegations.
Spencer Platt Getty

Originally published on Sat April 4, 2015 10:30 am

In New York City, police rarely talk on the record at all, especially about a touchy subject like quotas. But Officer Adhyl Polanco is an exception.

"The culture is, you're not working unless you are writing summonses or arresting people," says Polanco.

One of the dirty secrets in law enforcement that no one likes to talk about is quotas. Police departments routinely deny requiring officers to deliver a set number of tickets or arrests. But critics say that kind of numbers-based policing is real, and corrodes the community's relationship with the police.

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The Salt
7:07 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Straight Out Of Brooklyn: 'Encyclofoodia' Pokes Fun At Foodies

Bloomsbury Publishing

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 12:55 pm

If you're trying to feed some of the lumberjack hipsters of Brooklyn, you might try serving up some Huevos Machismos. And if you're seeking the next cleanse trend, look no further than the Ultimate Gushy Protein Sewage Blast. Like any balanced smoothie, it incorporates one ounce of "pure, uncut cocaine (for the boost)."

These are the recipes and advice you'd receive from the Mizretti brothers, two fictional restaurateurs who just published an "encyclofoodia" and cookbook called FUDS.

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Code Switch
6:32 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Proposals To Diversify NYC's Top High Schools Would Do Little To Help, Study Finds

Black and Latino students make up around 70 percent of the student population of New York City's public schools, but makeup a tiny percentage at the city's three elite specialized high schools.
New York City Department of Education

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 7:44 pm

New York City's public school system is vast, with more than a million students spread across thousands of schools. And like the city itself, it's remarkably diverse — about 15 percent Asian, just under 30 percent black, about 40 percent Latino, and about 15 percent white, with all sorts of finer shadings of ethnicity, nationality and language in that mix.

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Business
6:13 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

While Pay Holds Steady For Most, Low-Wage Workers Get A Boost

McDonald's announced this week that it will pay workers in its company-owned stores $1 more per hour than the local minimum wage. Wal-Mart, Target and the parent company of Marshalls and TJ Maxx have also promised to boost wages for their lowest-paid workers this year.
Lucy Nicholson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 12:03 pm

The vast majority of U.S. workers haven't seen any real wage gains since the recession. But that's starting to change, at least for low-income workers.

This week, fast-food giant McDonald's announced it will pay workers $1 more than the local minimum wage.

It joins some of the nation's other largest employers, including Wal-Mart, Target and TJX, the parent company of Marshalls and TJ Maxx. All say they will be boosting pay to at least $9 per hour this year, and some will go to $10 next year.

For Wal-Mart alone, that's a pay raise for half a million Americans.

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Shots - Health News
5:09 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

California Faith Groups Divided Over Right-To-Die Bill

The Rev. Vernon Holmes leads a Lutheran congregation near Sacramento, Calif., that supports the state's right-to-die bill. He describes his faith as promoting quality of life.
Andrew Nixon Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:54 pm

Clergy, more than a lot of people, come face to face with death regularly.

The Rev. Vernon Holmes, for example, leads a Lutheran congregation near Sacramento; the average age of members is 79.

His faith promotes quality of life, Holmes says. And that same faith leads him to challenge the status quo and injustice. His congregation belongs to an advocacy group called California Church Impact, which supports California's bill that would allow the terminally ill to end their own lives with medical assistance.

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Goats and Soda
5:07 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

How Advances In Battlefield Medicine Can Save Civilians' Lives

Medics surround a wounded U.S. soldier as he arrives at Kandahar Air Field in Afghanistan.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:03 pm

About 10 years ago, Dr. Swaminatha Mahadevan was conducting research at a Nepalese hospital, when he witnessed something that would never have happened back home in California.

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Around the Nation
4:53 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

California's Ongoing Drought Hits Water Recreation Businesses

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:53 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Wisconsin City Serves As Model For Community Policing

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 3:09 pm

In the wake of fatal police-involved shootings, cities are looking for ways to institute police department reforms. A community policing program in Racine, Wis., calls for police officers to work out of people's houses in specific neighborhoods.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:53 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Storm-Ready Design Defends Hospitals Against Natural Disasters

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:42 pm

The 2011 tornado in Joplin, Mo., destroyed the city's hospital and left the injured with almost no where to go for emergency services. With an increasing number of large-scale natural disasters, hospitals are incorporating new storm-resistant features into their designs.

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Code Switch
4:48 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Way More College Students Are Studying Korean. Is 'Hallyu' The Reason?

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:12 pm

A recent study found that in general, college students aren't taking foreign language classes as much as they used to — a slowdown of nearly 7 percent since 2009. But for one language in particular, there's actually been a pretty amazing jump in the rate of enrollment: Korean.

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It's All Politics
4:20 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Michelle Obama's 'Evolution Of Mom Dancing' Is Back With Part 2

The Tonight Show

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 5:56 pm

On The Tonight Show Thursday, Jimmy Fallon and first lady Michelle Obama dug out their cardigans to bring back their dance hit, "Evolution of Mom Dancing." Obama was on the show to promote the fifth anniversary of her "Let's Move" campaign against childhood obesity.

Here are some highlights from the interview:

1) Fallon's attempt at an Obama impression

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Television
3:13 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

The PBS Version Of 'Wolf Hall' Unfolds Like A Real-Life House Of Cards

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Shots - Health News
2:52 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Men And Women Use Different Scales To Weigh Moral Dilemmas

Todd Davidson Getty Images/Illustration Works

You find a time machine and travel to 1920. A young Austrian artist and war veteran named Adolf Hitler is staying in the hotel room next to yours. The doors aren't locked, so you could easily stroll next door and smother him. World War II would never happen.

But Hitler hasn't done anything wrong yet. Is it acceptable to kill him to prevent World War II?

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The Two-Way
2:13 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

For U.S. Workers, The March Of Progress Slows Down

The big question hanging over the U.S. economy: Did job growth just take a rest during the harsh winter, or is it shifting to a much slower pace?
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 2:19 pm

Dear March,

We got your news that employers added just 126,000 jobs on your watch. Hate to say it, but you have disappointed everyone. No doubt you'll say you were under the weather — literally. Sure, it was cold, but still ... Let's hope April does better.

Sincerely,

America

On Friday, the Labor Department's report on weak jobs growth left economists scrambling to explain what went wrong in March.

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