National

Dead Stop
12:12 am
Thu June 7, 2012

How Dorothy Parker Came To Rest In Baltimore

Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke (center left) and NAACP Executive Director Benjamin Hooks lower the ashes of writer Dorothy Parker into her final resting place at the NAACP headquarters in 1988.
Carlos Rosario AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:17 pm

The writer, poet and critic Dorothy Parker was technically not a native New Yorker; she was born at her family's beach cottage in New Jersey. But she always considered New York City to be her beloved hometown. It's where she grew up, where she struggled during her early days as a writer, where she became famous, and where she died of a heart attack at the age of 73.

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Shots - Health Blog
7:57 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

CT Scans Boost Cancer Risks For Kids

Isabel Doran, 4, gets a CT scan at Children's National Medical Center with her mom, Veronica Doran. The X-ray radiation in CT scans raises the risks for cancer, including leukemia, a new study shows.
Dayna Smith The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 6:04 am

Children who get CT scans are at slightly increased risk for brain cancer and leukemia, according to a large international study released Tuesday.

CT scans create detailed images of the inside of the body. So they're great for diagnosing all sorts of medical problems — so great that their use has soared in recent years. More than 80 million are being done every year in the United States.

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Health
6:41 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Children Getting CT Scans At Higher Risk For Cancer

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

New research out today indicates that a popular medical test may increase the risk for some forms of cancer. A large international study found that CAT scans, which are also known as CT scans, can increase the risk for leukemia and brain cancer in children.

NPR's Rob Stein joins us now to talk about the new findings. And, Rob, I understand the concerns about these scans have been building for a long time. So what's the specific source of worry here?

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Religion
5:45 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Prayers Divided Over Gay Marriage Ban In Minnesota

Catholics gather outside the Minnesota Capitol in St. Paul for the Family Rosary Procession on May 6. They marched from the Capitol to the Cathedral of St. Paul in support of an amendment that would define marriage as between one man and one woman.
Alex Kolyer for MPR

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Two domes dominate the skyline of St. Paul: up high, the Roman Catholic Cathedral of St. Paul, and downhill, the Minnesota Capitol. On a recent Sunday afternoon, hundreds of Catholics assembled on the steps of the Capitol for the annual Family Rosary Procession.

"How do we define marriage?" the crowd was asked. Their response: "One man and one woman!"

An auxiliary bishop in purple robes, Knights of Columbus in their plumed chapeaus and capes, and a white statue of the Virgin Mary led the faithful up to the cathedral, reciting the rosary.

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Around the Nation
5:09 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Florida To Purge Non-Citizens From Voter Rolls

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Florida officials say they plan to go ahead with efforts to purge people believed to be non-citizens from the state's voter rolls. The move comes after efforts by the Justice Department and county election supervisors to halt the purge.

Politics
5:08 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

What's In Store For Unions After Wis. Recall?

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, the lessons of the Wisconsin recall vote for organized labor. Joining me is Thea Lee, deputy chief of staff of the AFL-CIO. Welcome.

THEA LEE: Thank you.

SIEGEL: And in the interests of full disclosure, I should acknowledge that I and most of the people you hear on NPR are members of an AFL-CIO union, Screen Actors Guild, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Labor went all on against Scott Walker, and he prevailed. What's the takeaway?

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Shots - Health Blog
5:04 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis A 'Serious Epidemic' In China

Gao Weiwei, a doctor of the Beijing Chest Hospital which specializes in the treatment of tuberculosis, talks to a patient suspected to have tuberculosis at the hospital in Tongzhou, near Beijing, March 27, 2009.
Ng Han Guan AP

China's first national survey of tuberculosis has produced some of the worst TB news in years.

Out of the million Chinese who develop TB every year, researchers say at least 110,000 get a form that's resistant to the mainstay drugs isoniazid and rifampin. Patients with such multidrug-resistant or MDR tuberculosis have to be treated for up to two years with expensive second-line drugs that are toxic and less effective.

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Economy
5:02 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Young Adults Without Degrees Struggle To Find Work

Columbia High School graduates walk to their commencement ceremony in Nampa, Idaho. A new Rutgers University study says nearly half of recent high school graduates are still looking for full-time work.
Charlie Litchfield AP

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 4:41 pm

The job market is still bleak for young people with only high school diplomas. Nearly half of high school graduates are still looking for full-time work, according to a new report by Rutgers University's John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development.

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Politics
5:00 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Will Failed Wisconsin Recall Boost Tea Party?

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Does the Wisconsin recall result have national implications and is the message a victory for the Tea Party? Well, we're going to ask a Republican political consultant who is very much identified with Tea Party candidates.

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Politics
4:54 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Barrett Loses Rematch In Wis. Recall Election

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Politics
4:54 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

New Primary System Shakes Up California Elections

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

California voters also turned out yesterday, and one thing is clear: The state's new open primary system has shaken things up. Under the new system, the top two candidates will move onto the general election, regardless of party. And in quite a few races, this means come November, two candidates of the same party will face off. NPR's Tamara Keith has that story.

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Business
4:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Good Times For Airlines, So Where Are The Deals?

A Delta Air Lines flight takes off from the Ronald Regan National Airport in Washington, D.C. As the price of oil trickles down, the airline industry is projected to have a historic good year.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

The rest of the economy may not be doing great, but airlines are expecting a banner year. Profitability is up and fuel prices are declining, but that's not necessarily great news for consumers.

When Robert Herbst, a former pilot and industry consultant for many years, says the skies are blue, it sounds pretty convincing. And from Herbst's projections, this may be a historic year for the airline industry.

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The Salt
4:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Many Food Workers Keep Working While Sick, Survey Finds

Workers harvest cantaloupe near Firebaugh, Calif.
Gosia Wosniacka AP

We've all probably been there, at work, feeling crummy, when we should be home in bed. Maybe we do it because we need the money, or we feel like we can't miss that super important meeting. But what if you work with food and coming in sick means potentially infecting hundreds of other people?

A coalition of food labor groups says it happens a lot, and they blame the lack of paid sick days for people who pick, process, sell, cook and serve food.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:16 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

To Count As A Young Scientist, Anything Less Than 52 Will Do

You're not getting older, you're getting better.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:53 am

I always suspected that the pursuit of science could keep a person young — or at least young at heart.

Now I have evidence. Sort of.

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, a charity that helps raise money to support the NIH, today announced the Lurie Prize. A $100,000 check awaits a "promising young scientist in biomedical research" with the right stuff.

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Politics
3:50 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

What Wisconsin's Recall Means For Labor Unions

Rick Muir, president of the Indiana Federation of Teachers, chanted with other protesters at the Statehouse in Indianapolis in February 2011 over legislation limiting collective bargaining for teachers. Months later, it became law.
AJ Mast AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 5:06 pm

The Wisconsin recall election might have failed, but it succeeded in sending an ominous message to pro-labor forces across the nation — especially in the Midwest, where a handful of legislatures are pushing to roll back collective bargaining and other union rights.

The vote against Republican Gov. Scott Walker was prompted by his support for a law limiting collective bargaining for some public sector employees. His victory Tuesday night could embolden governors in states such as Ohio, Indiana and Missouri to push back harder on labor rights.

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