National

NPR Story
1:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Buddhist Monk Confronts Japan's Suicide Culture

Alarmed by a rise in people jumping to their deaths in front of trains, Japanese railway operators are installing special blue lights above station platforms they hope will have a soothing effect and reduce suicides, Oct. 14, 2009. (Itsuo Inouye/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

Japan’s suicide rate is twice that of the United States. More than 30,000 people a year kill themselves in Japan.

So many people jump in front of subway trains that when a train stops between stations, people just assume it’s a suicide.

A Buddhist monk, Ittetsu Nemoto, decided he wanted to do something about that. He now works with depressed Japanese people who make the journey to his temple.

Larissa MacFarquhar, a staff writer for The New Yorker, wrote about Nemoto in a recent issue.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Fears Of Civil War In Egypt After 'Massacre'

An Egyptian man cries outside a morgue after carrying the corpse of his brother killed near the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 8, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

The only Islamist group to join the military in deposing the elected government of Mohammed Morsi says it will withdraw its support for the transition plan in response to what it calls a “massacre” of pro-Morsi supporters.

Egypt’s state news agency says at least 51 civilians are dead and over 400 injured after the Egyptian army opened fire on hundreds of Islamists who had been holding a sit-in outside the offices of the Republican Guard in Cairo.

The protesters were demanding that the army reinstate Mohammed Morsi to the presidency.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Politics This Week: Immigration, Student Loan Rates

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

Congress is back from it’s Fourth of July recess. With only 15 laws passed so far this year, lawmakers will again take up immigration reform and the farm bill.

Senate Democrats are expected to hold a vote this week on a plan to extend the fixed 3.4 percent student loan rate for another year. The rate rose to 6.8 percent on July 1.

NPR’s senior Washington editor Ron Elving joins us for a preview of what to expect this week in politics.

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Television
1:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

'The Bridge:' Mayhem On The Border, With Big Issues At Stake

In the new FX series The Bridge, Diane Kruger stars as a detective investigating a murder along the U.S.-Mexico border.
Jordin Althaus FX Networks

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:37 pm

The FX version of the Scandinavian series The Bridge, like the Showtime version of the Israeli TV series that inspired Homeland, is a major revamp as well as a crucial relocation. With Homeland, the focus became American politics and home-soil terrorism. In The Bridge, premiering July 10, the setting is changed to the U.S.-Mexico border. This allows executive producer Meredith Stiehm, a writer-producer from Homeland, to deal with everything that relocation provides — including the white-hot issues of immigration reform and border security.

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Television
1:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

As 'Ray Donovan,' Liev Schreiber Cleans Up Hollywood's Messes

One of the aspects that attracted Schreiber to Ray Donovan was the prospect of playing a character for whom words were relatively unimportant.
Showtime

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:53 am

In the new Showtime series Ray Donovan, Liev Schreiber stars in the title role as a man who knows how to handle a crisis. It's Donovan's job to clean up the messes of Hollywood's rich and powerful while trying to keep his own personal problems under wraps.

A TV series is something of a new turn for Schreiber, who's been acting onstage and in movies for two decades. But playing complicated characters is something he's earned a reputation for, with roles in films like Defiance and The Manchurian Candidate.

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Religion
11:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

After Rulings, Faith Leader Continues To Fight Gay Marriage

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We are going to continue our conversation about how the Supreme Court's major rulings on same-sex marriage are affecting people's lives. We have a different perspective now. We're turning to Reverend Derek McCoy. He's an associate pastor of Hope Christian Church in Beltsville, Maryland. He's also president of the Maryland Family Alliance, which opposed legalizing same-sex marriage in that state. Unsuccessfully, I should say. Pastor McCoy, thank you so much for speaking with us once again.

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On Aging
11:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Winning Gold In Their Golden Years

Swimmer John Tatum proudly wears his gold medals from the National Senior Olympics.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 7:57 pm

John Tatum is 94 years old. He is a swimmer. And a gold medalist.

Tatum is one of thousands of the top athletes in the U.S. who run, vault and swim for the gold in the National Senior Games. All of these seniors are over age 50, and some are over 100. And they show no signs of slowing down.

"I see no end for me," Tatum says. "I would like to just compete year after year after year. You know, I'm 94, probably could be 100, I don't know. But as long as I am healthy, I can do it."

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

The Life Of Paula Deen: In A Four-Course Menu

Cooking show host Paula Deen visits FOX Studios in December.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:19 pm

Appetizer: Hogs In A Sleeping Bag

These hearty kielbasas, partially hidden in puff pastries, represent Paula Deen's first catering company The Bag Lady — begun in 1989. It offered "lunch and love" ... in a bag.

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It's All Politics
10:39 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Texas' Looming Hispanic Shift Explained In 2 Charts

A bilingual sign outside a polling center ahead of local elections in Austin, Texas, on April 28.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 4:12 pm

NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Within a decade, Hispanics are projected to eclipse non-Hispanic whites as the largest race or ethnic group in Texas. It's a development that could someday shift the state's — or, given the size of Texas, even the nation's — politics.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Mon July 8, 2013

10 Killed In Crash Of Alaska Air Taxi

Police and emergency personnel stand near the remains of a fixed-wing aircraft that was engulfed in flames Sunday at the Soldotna Airport in Alaska.
Rashah McChesney Peninsula Clarion

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:11 pm

One of the worst civilian aviation accidents in the state in at least 25 years killed all 10 people aboard an air taxi in Alaska on Sunday, the Anchorage Daily News writes.

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dramatic Crash Video Among Latest Clues In Asiana Accident

Asiana Flight 214, a Boeing 777 aircraft, after Saturday's crash at San Francisco International Airport.
NTSB/Contra Costa Times MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:19 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Richard Gonzales reports

"Oh my God ... oh my God ... oh my God."

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Around the Nation
6:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Indiana State Fair To Feature Giant Popcorn Ball

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. In China it's the Year of the Snake. In Indiana, it's the year of popcorn. This year's state fair will feature, what else, a giant popcorn ball. A company called Snax in Pax is using a mold that's eight-feet wide. Owner Will Huggins says it will be edible but he doesn't recommend taking a bite. Maybe because it'll be a little stale.

Around the Nation
6:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Volunteers Sought For 1813 Flag Project

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The Fourth of July weekend is over, but celebrations continue, and I'm not talking about left-over fireworks. The Maryland Historical Society is recreating the flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore 200 years ago. Mary Pickersgill and four others sewed the original Star Spangled Banner in 1813. Now volunteers will recreate it using the same type of fabric, stitching and time frame. They have six weeks to complete the 30-by-40 foot flag.

Politics
5:04 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Republicans Slow To 'Reset' Despite Election Autopsy Report

A few months ago, the Republican National Committee released several recommendations for broadening the party's voter appeal. The report told the GOP to reach out to women, younger voters and Hispanics. But so far, that has not been the direction party leaders have taken in Congress or in the media.

Around the Nation
5:02 am
Mon July 8, 2013

NTSB Investigators Probe Clues Of Asiana Flight 214 Crash

More details are emerging about the crash of Asiana flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday that killed two people. The Boeing 777 jet nearly stalled on its approach to land, and the flight crew tried to take corrective action just seconds before it hit the ground. There's also word the pilot, while having extensive flying experience, had only 43 hours on the 777.

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