National

The Two-Way
7:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Bergdahl's Hometown Cancels Celebration Of His Return

Hailey, Idaho: A sign announcing the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl outside Zaney's coffee shop, where Bergdahl worked as a teenager. A rally celebrating his return home has been canceled, after organizers received threats of protests and hate mail.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 8:48 am

The news of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release from five years of captivity had been welcomed as a reason to celebrate in Hailey, Idaho. But organizers of a rally held in Bergdahl's honor while he was a prisoner say they're canceling this year's event, citing backlash over the U.S. deal with the Taliban that freed him.

In recent years, the Bring Back Bowe Rally has been an annual June event in the small town of Hailey, where bikers and POW-MIA support groups gathered to call for his return. Last year's event reportedly drew a crowd of more than 3,000.

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Sports
7:05 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Miami Heat Aims To Win Legacy-Defining 3rd Straight NBA Title

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
6:58 am
Thu June 5, 2014

2 Governors Face Off Over Hockey's Stanley Cup

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:06 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Vultures Land On K Street

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. There's a certain kind of news story for which you simply must rely on The Washington Post. This is that story. The Post published pictures of vultures on K Street. Washingtonians know K Street as the classic address for Washington lobbyists. A Post reporter got one punch line after another when asking passersby what they thought of vultures roosting on a K Street rooftop, like the bird variety. And that sounds appropriate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
5:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Is Working Past Retirement Age An Antidote To Getting Old?

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The word retirement is losing its meaning. A new study finds that almost half the people who say they are retired are still working or have worked in the recent past. Nearly three quarters of baby boomers who are not yet retired say they plan to stay on the job past retirement age. NPR's Ina Jaffe has more.

INA JAFFE, BYLINE: This is a dictionary definition of retirement.

KEN DYCHTWALD: It says, to disappear, to withdraw and go away.

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Remembrances
5:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Chester Nez, Last Of Navajo Code Talkers, Dies At 93

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The last original Navajo code talker died yesterday. Chester Nez was one of 29 men who used their native English to devise an unbreakable code for the U.S. military. Here's Laurel Morales of member station KJZZ.

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Politics
5:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Senate Expected To Approve Sebelius Replacement At HHS

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

The Senate votes Thursday on the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell to be Health and Human Services Secretary, replacing Kathleen Sebelius. Burwell was running the Office of Management and Budget.

The Salt
3:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

The Secret's In The Sugar: Lower-Alcohol Wines Are Taking Off

A selection of low-alcohol wines, including a Riesling from Germany, a Vinho Verde from Portugal and a Txakoli from the Basque region of Spain.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:18 am

Big, bold wines have their fans. But with the arrival of summer, make room for a bumper crop of lighter, more subtle wines.

"Low-alcohol wines are super hot right now," says wine writer Katherine Cole.

There's Txakoli, or Txakolina, wines from the Basque region of Spain, Rieslings from Germany and New York state, and Vinho Verde from Portugal, to name a few.

These wines typically hover in the 9 percent to 11 percent alcohol range. This compares to about 13 percent to 14 percent in a typical California chardonnay.

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Shots - Health News
6:25 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

The Camel Did It: Scientists Nail Down Source Of Middle East Virus

A Saudi Arabian man wears a mask to protect against the Middle East respiratory syndrome at his farm outside Riyadh, May 12.
Fayez Nureldine AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 4:40 pm

In the two years since Middle East respiratory syndrome was first diagnosed in people, scientists have struggled to figure out how we catch the deadly virus. Some blamed bats. Others pointed at camels.

Now scientists in Saudi Arabia offer the strongest evidence yet that the one-humped dromedaries can indeed spread the MERS virus — which has infected more than 800 people on four continents, including two men in the U.S.

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Shots - Health News
5:05 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Doctors Hesitate To Ask Heart Patients About End-Of-Life Plans

Michael Jung iStock

Of the 5 million Americans with failing hearts, about half of them will die within five years of getting diagnosed. Given the odds, it seems that people with heart failure should start thinking about how they want to die.

But doctors don't routinely talk to those patients about end-of-life planning.

When researchers asked 50 doctors and 45 nurse practitioners and physician assistants how often they discuss preparing for death with their heart failure patients.

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

An Underwater Race To Transplant Miami's Rare Corals

Close-up of a star coral rescued by Coral Morphologic from a reef in Miami's shipping channel.
Courtesy of Coral Morphologic

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 7:18 pm

A lab just off Florida's Miami River has become the base for an unusual lifesaving operation.

A group of scientists there is on an urgent mission to save as many corals as it can before the marine creatures are destroyed as part of an underwater excavation of Miami's shipping channel. The channel — set to be dredged and deepened on Saturday — is home to a thriving coral reef.

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Shots - Health News
5:00 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Privacy Law Frustrates Parents Of Mentally Ill Adult Children

Mark, a California minister, says the day he was first shut out of all treatment discussions regarding his mentally ill teenage son "was the first time we really started to feel hopeless."
Jenny Gold Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 4:40 pm

The horrifying mass shooting in Isla Vista, Calif., last month brought up many questions. What could parents have done to prevent the tragedy? And what did they actually know about their son's mental illness?

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Politics
4:08 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

After State Lawmaker Comes Out, Campaign Becomes Battle Of Write-ins

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 7:18 pm

How much does sexual orientation matter to voters in rural Pennsylvania? Incumbent Mike Fleck, who was re-elected three times before he came out as gay in 2012, lost the Republican state house primary to a write-in candidate. But he's not out of the race yet: He won as a write-in on the Democratic ballot instead.

Shots - Health News
3:36 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

VA Health Care's Chronic Ailments: Long Waits And Red Tape

Soldiers returning from the Pacific wave from the deck of the USS General Mitchell on Dec. 11, 1945. Much of the health care demand in the VA system is from veterans of earlier wars.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:40 pm

More than 2.5 million veterans served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and they qualify for health care and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. These recent vets have been putting in for more service-related conditions than previous generations, for everything from post-traumatic stress disorder and brain injury to the bad knees, bad backs and bad hearing that nearly every new vet seems to have.

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NPR News Investigations
3:34 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Life After 'Life': Aging Inmates Struggle For Redemption

John Huckleberry sits in the back seat of a friend's car on the way back from visiting inmates at Sterling Correctional Facility. After 30 years in prison, Huckleberry — who was released in 2012 — helps aging inmates prepare for life outside prison.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:29 pm

Out in the empty plains of northeast Colorado two years ago, nine inmates line up against a wall inside the Sterling Correctional Facility. It's a line of green jumpsuits and gray hair.

The men, hobbling on canes, wait for the others to pull plastic chairs into a circle so class can begin. Today's instruction is about what life is like on the outside: how to use an ATM, how to find a job, what the Internet is.

These men have been in prison for two, three or four decades. These are things none of them know.

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