National

NPR Story
5:10 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Could Political Patronage In Chicago Be A Thing Of The Past?

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:47 am

A federal judge in Chicago will decide on Monday whether to end the federal monitoring of hiring, firing and promotions in city government to ensure politics is not a part of the process.

Shots - Health News
3:52 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Power To The Health Data Geeks

Dave Vockell, CEO of the software company Lyfechannel, takes first place β€” and wins $20,000 β€” in the Code-a-Palooza Challenge at Health Datapalooza 2014.
David Hathcox David Hathcox for Health Data Consortium

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 4:09 pm

A computer programmer and a kid in a Batman suit walk into a pancake house ...

It sounds like a joke, but it really happened, and now the programmer β€” Dave Vockell β€” has a new product to bring to market. It's an app to help seniors talk to their doctors about medical care.

"Like all great health care breakthroughs, it happened at the International House of Pancakes," he says, half-jokingly.

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Health
3:50 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Father Devises A 'Bionic Pancreas' To Help Son With Diabetes

Ed Damiano and his son David, 15, play basketball at home in Acton, Mass. Ed has invented a device he hopes will make David's diabetes easier to manage.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:00 am

An alarm sounds on Ed Damiano's night stand in the middle of the night. He jumps out of bed and rushes into his son's room next door.

His son, David, has Type 1 diabetes. The 15-year-old sleeps hooked up to a monitor that sounds an alarm when his blood sugar gets too low. If it drops sharply, David could die in his sleep.

"The fear is that there's going to be this little cold limb, and I screwed up. It's all on me," Damiano says.

But when he touches David's hand, he's warm. He's OK. Damiano says, "That's the moment of relief."

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Around the Nation
5:11 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

From Resumes To Romance, Giving Young Dads The Skills To Succeed

Members of the L.A. Fathers Program practice a role-playing exercise β€” standing on chairs and yelling to see what it feels like when an adult yells at a child.
Courtesy L.A. Fathers Program

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 6:38 pm

On a Wednesday night, just a few days before Fathers Day, a group of young men gather in a classroom on the fourth floor of Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. There's food β€” pizza, soda and cookies β€” and the men stack their paper plates high before settling into their seats around the table in the center of the room. The meeting is about to begin.

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The Record
11:38 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Casey Kasem, An Iconic Voice Of American Radio

Casey Kasem, in 1975.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 12:56 pm

Casey Kasem, the countdown king of music radio and the voice of Scooby-Doo's Shaggy, has died at 82, his publicist confirmed Sunday.

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Around the Nation
7:23 am
Sun June 15, 2014

More Than A Vacation: Family Hikes The Appalachian Trail

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Only 1 in 4 people who attempt to hike the entire Appalachian Trail actually make it. And we're talking adult hikers who know what they're in for. On this week's Wingin' It, we're going to speak with the Kallin family. They are currently hiking the more than 2,000 mile trail.

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Parallels
4:35 am
Sun June 15, 2014

In London, An Underground Home For The World's Mosquitoes

Dr. James Logan, an entomologist, studies mosquitoes from around the world in an effort to make them less dangerous. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine keeps them in a cavern beneath the streets of London. The bowls contain mosquito larvae in water, while the boxes are where the adults live.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 8:37 am

You can't hear it over the noise of London's traffic. But it's there. That faint, whining hum. Right under my feet, thousands of mosquitoes are dining on human blood.

To visit them, you have to go through a sliding glass door into the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. This school started as a hospital on the Thames River, where doctors treated sailors returning from faraway places with strange parasites.

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Mental Health
5:06 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

When Cop Calls Involve The Mentally Ill, Training Is Key

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

While mental illness wasn't a known factor in the events in Las Vegas, it has been at the foreground in a spate of recent shootings. Police officers around the country are dealing with this issue more and more. About 25 years ago, one young officer had an experience that forever changed the way he thought about mental illness.

MICHAEL WOODY: A 27-year-old young woman, single mother of a 7-year-old child, tried to take my life.

RATH: That's Michael Woody. At the time, he was a sergeant for the Akron, Ohio police department.

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Around the Nation
10:35 am
Sat June 14, 2014

The 'Kony 2012' Effect: Recovering From A Viral Sensation

Invisible Children co-founders Jason Russell, left, Bobby Bailey, center, and Laren Poole, record footage in Africa in 2007.
PRWeb

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 11:52 pm

A little over two years ago, you or somebody you know probably watched "Kony 2012," the YouTube video that redefined what it means to go viral.

The video was made by a small San Diego nonprofit called Invisible Children. It shed light on Joseph Kony, the central African warlord who recruited child soldiers.

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Code Switch
8:57 am
Sat June 14, 2014

50 Years Ago, Freedom Summer Began By Training For Battle

Freedom Summer activists sing before leaving training sessions at Western College for Women in Oxford, Ohio, for Mississippi in June 1964.
Ted Polumbaum Collection Newseum

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 6:51 pm

Idealism drove hundreds of college students to Mississippi 50 years ago.

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Around the Nation
8:04 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Obama Takes A Trip To A Sioux Indian Reservation

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 12:12 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

President Obama visited the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation yesterday on the border between North and South Dakota. At a celebration honoring Native American veterans, he quoted the tribe's best-known member - Chief Sitting Bull.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: He said, let's put our minds together to see what we can build for our children.

(APPLAUSE)

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Around the Nation
8:04 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Town Shoots For Tacky World Record In Duck Tape Festival

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 12:12 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This weekend, the 11 annual Duct Tape Festival in Avon, Ohio, where Duct Tape - which is a brand of duct, with a T, tape - is manufactured. The festival is held to celebrate and spotlight just about anything you can make with duct tape, and what you can make may surprise you. We're going to go now to Mel Rainey, who is an art teacher at Elyria High School in Avon, Ohio. Thanks for being with us, Mr. Rainey.

MEL RAINEY: No problem - any time.

SIMON: So your students have been building a float for five months?

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Law
7:40 am
Sat June 14, 2014

Despite Death Penalty Repeal, Conn. Hands Down A Death Sentence

Richard Roszkowski, convicted of murdering three people in 2006, listens during his sentencing in Bridgeport, Conn., in May. Connecticut is one of three states that has eliminated the death penalty only for crimes committed after the repeal took effect.
Brian A. Pounds AP

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 12:12 pm

On Sept. 7, 2006, Richard Roszkowski chased after a 9-year-old girl named Kylie Flannery. He shot her three times, ultimately killing her, as well as two adults.

Last month, a Connecticut judge sentenced Roszkowski to death for the crimes β€” despite the fact that the state eliminated the death penalty in 2012.

"This is a terrible sentence," Judge John Blawie said at the sentencing hearing. "But it is in truth, sir, a sentence you wrote for yourself on Sept. 7, 2006."

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The Two-Way
5:48 am
Sat June 14, 2014

A San Francisco 'Painted Lady' Sells For $900K Under Asking Price

Michael Shannon, 66, bought the green Queen Anne Victorian on the corner in 1975 for $65,000.
_tar0_ Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:38 am

The largest and oldest house of San Francisco's seven "Painted Ladies," which anchors the corner of "Postcard Row," has finally been sold for $3.1 million, $900k below its original asking price.

The house was originally put on the market in 2010, and was removed after several price reductions. In March, it was put on the market again.

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Shots - Health News
6:35 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cancer When You're Young Isn't Always 'The Fault In Our Stars'

In The Fault in Our Stars, Gus and Hazel, played by Ansel Elgort and Shailene Woodley, play two teenagers with cancer.
James Bridges AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 12:55 pm

It's hard not to be charmed by Hazel and Gus, the flippant yet noble teenagers with cancer in the hit film The Fault in Our Stars. But movies have a bad habit of taking life-or-death health crises and turning them into clichΓ©.

To find out if The Fault in Our Stars stayed true, we called on the experts – people who have had cancer as teenagers and young adults. Not surprisingly, most of them have read the book and seen the movie.

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