National

Around the Nation
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

19th Century Virginia Tunnel A Relic Of American Ingenuity

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Virginia, there is a cold, damp relic of American ingenuity called the Crozet Tunnel. It was built in the 1850s for the Blue Ridge railroad. For a time, it was the longest tunnel in America, nearly a mile long, under Afton Mountain. Well, today, it's abandoned. But for years, local officials wanted to turn it into a walking path. Well, now it looks like that'll happen.

Reporter Eric Mennel visited the tunnel before it's a change.

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U.S.
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Walking Back The Largest U.S. Power Blackout, 10 Years Later

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Ten years ago tomorrow, a sagging electrical line outside of Cleveland touched some overgrown tree limbs. That seemingly minor event triggered a chain reaction and a massive power outage. The blackout affected some 50 million people in eight states and Canada. From member station WCPN, David C. Barnett reports on the biggest power blackout in U.S. history and some of the changes that it prompted.

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Shots - Health News
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Medical Discount Plan In Nevada Skips Insurers

Mounting medical debt and struggles with insurers led Shelley Toreson to drop her health insurance. She now pays discounted rates upfront for her medical needs.
Pauline Bartolone Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:19 pm

Shelley Toreson, who lives near Reno, Nev., had health insurance for years — but not anymore. Instead, she is part of an unusual Nevada nonprofit that helps connect 12,000 uninsured residents to doctors and hospitals that are willing to accept a lower, negotiated fee for their services.

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U.S.
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Red Cross For Rover: Inside America's Canine Blood Banks

At Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank in Purcellville, Va., dog holder Diane Garcia snuggles with one-year-old Doberman Leon as phlebotomist Rebecca Pearce taps his jugular vein to start the blood draw. Leon's "mom," Carrie Smalser, feeds him peanut butter, to keep him happily distracted and calm.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:55 pm

America is facing a blood shortage — a shortage of dog blood. Whether Fido tangles with a car and loses, or Barky contracts a blood-damaging disease, dogs — like their people — sometimes need transfusions. And while there's no centralized Red Cross for Rover, there are a few commercial canine blood banks across the country, and many veterinary schools do their own blood banking.

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Race
4:11 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Read The Most Important Bits From NYC's Stop-And-Frisk Ruling

U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled New York City's stop-and-frisk policy unconstitutional, and said the practice, as applied, unfairly targeted blacks and Latinos.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:33 pm

Judge Shira Scheindlin has earned a reputation as an outspoken defender of civil liberties and a recurring foil for the New York City police. In her ruling in the closely watched stop-and-frisk case, Scheindlin criticized the police, and said the department discriminated against blacks and Latinos. She also said the police force has long ignored complaints about the way the tactic has been carried out.

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It's All Politics
3:09 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Star-Making Turn As Newark Mayor Launches Booker Toward D.C.

U.S. Senate candidate Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, N.J., speaks to the media after casting his ballot for the Senate primary on Tuesday.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:49 pm

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Would Some Marriages Be Better If Couples Signed 'Wedleases'?

To have and hold, to sign on the bottom line?
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:56 pm

"People marry and divorce as if getting married is the equivalent of the high school concept of going steady," says Florida lawyer Paul Rampell.

Which is why, as Rampell said Tuesday on Tell Me More, he's pitching the idea of "wedleases."

That is:

"A combination of the words wedlock and lease. Two people commit themselves to a marriage, to a written contract for a period of years. One year. Five years. Ten years. Whatever term suits them.

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Parenting
1:54 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Child Safety: Stranger Danger Warning Needs Updating

'Stranger Danger' used to be the mantra parents taught their kids to keep them safe. But now we're learning that strangers aren't the main problem - children are usually harmed by people they already know. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks child safety with a roundtable of experts and parents.

Around the Nation
1:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Not Take That Marriage Out For A Test Ride?

With so many marriages ending in divorce today, some people wonder if the legal definition of marriage needs updating. One lawyer, Paul Rampell, says maybe it's time to consider 'leasing' your marriage - with the option to renew. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to Rampell about his idea.

Law
1:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Stop-And-Frisk: 'I Remember Feeling Helpless'

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:49 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we want to hear from one of the plaintiffs in the New York's stop-and-frisk lawsuit. Nicholas Peart is a lifelong resident of Harlem. He told his story to StoryCorp, that's the national project that records interviews between families and friends across the nation. More than once, he was stopped by police and patted down. One of the first incidents occurred seven years ago while he was out celebrating his 18th birthday, and he talked about that night in his own words.

(SOUNDBITE OF STORYCORP INTERVIEW)

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Law
1:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Stop-And-Frisk: Smart Policing Or Violation Of Rights?

A federal judge says New York City's stop-and-frisk policies have violated the rights of thousands of people. Guest Host Celeste Headlee discusses the ruling with Scott Burns of the National District Attorneys Association and criminal justice professor Delores Jones-Brown.

Health Care
1:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Explaining Health Care Exchanges

If health care exchanges have you confused, you're not alone. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to health reporter Mary Agnes Carey about the next phase of the Affordable Care Act.

Television
12:39 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

'Orange' Creator Jenji Kohan: 'Piper Was My Trojan Horse'

Jenji Kohan, seen here on the set of Orange Is the New Black, began her writing career on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.
Ursula Coyote Netflix

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:32 pm

A lot of people have been binge-watching the new Netflix series Orange Is the New Black, which is set in a minimum security women's prison.

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Shots - Health News
10:49 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Same-Sex Couples Seeking Insurance Wait For IRS Rules

Saying, "I do," may be easy part when it comes to health coverage.
iStockphoto.com

Now that the Supreme Court has ruled that the federal ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, federal agencies have to figure out the regulations that govern everything from immigration permission to income taxes.

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Monkey See
8:55 am
Tue August 13, 2013

On 'Doomsday Castle,' If Armageddon Doesn't Get You, Your Tractor Might

Brent, Jr. in his battering ram, on National Geographic Channel's Doomsday Castle.
National Geographic Channel

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