National

Health Care
11:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

New Health Exchanges: What You Need To Know

On October 1st, online health insurance exchanges open up as part of the Affordable Care Act. Kaiser Health News' Mary Agnes Carey speaks to host Michel Martin about what will change, and how you can prepare for the roll-out.

Monkey See
10:58 am
Wed July 31, 2013

10 Awkward, Unexpected, Or Otherwise Curious Press Tour Moments

Actors Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul speak onstage during the Breaking Bad panel on July 26.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

The Television Critics Association press tour, a two-week event in which press conference after press conference parades through a hotel ballroom, is about half over, so it's time for a few stories.

In a room of 250 or so reporters and a rotating set of actors, producers, and executives, there's likely to be a conversation here and there that perhaps doesn't go as everyone involved was expecting. After all, I've already been to 57 panel discussions or presentations (according to our transcripts list), and we have a week to go.

Read more
Shots - Health News
7:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Last Person To Get Smallpox Dedicated His Life To Ending Polio

Ali Maow Maalin said he avoided getting the smallpox vaccine as a young man because he was afraid of needles. He didn't want others to make the same mistake with polio.
Courtesy of the World Health Organization

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:13 pm

So far, the human race has eliminated just one disease in history: smallpox. But it's on the cusp of adding a second virus — polio — to that list.

One special man in Somalia was at the battlefront of both eradication efforts. He died last week of a sudden illness at age 59.

Ali Maow Maalin was the last member of the general public — worldwide — to catch smallpox. And he spent the past decade working to end polio in Somalia.

Read more
U.S.
3:12 am
Wed July 31, 2013

In Florida, A Clash Over Exhuming Bodies At Reform School

Metal crosses mark graves at the cemetery of the former Arthur Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Investigators in Florida using ground-penetrating radar and soil samples say there are nearly 100 unmarked graves on the grounds.
Michael Spooneybarger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:32 pm

Researchers at the University of South Florida are fighting with the state over access to the grounds of a now-closed reform school.

For decades, the Dozier School for Boys was notorious for the harsh treatment boys received there. Now, a forensic anthropologist and her team want permission to exhume dozens of bodies they found in unmarked graves, but are meeting resistance from state officials.

White House Boys

Read more
The Salt
5:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Despite Legal Blow, New York To Keep Up Sugary Drink Fight

On Tuesday, a state appeals court called New York City's ban on supersized soda unconstitutional.
Allison Joyce Getty Images News

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:01 pm

A state appeals court on Tuesday rejected New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's attempt to limit the size of sugary beverages sold in his city. But in a statement, Bloomberg and the city's top lawyer, Michael Cardozo, called the decision a "temporary setback" and vowed to appeal.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:40 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston.
Carrie Feibel KUHF

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:08 pm

Jack Goodman remembers the day his mother, Julie, told the family she had colorectal cancer. He was in seventh grade.

"They just sat us down on the futon in the living room, or the couch that we had, and told us," Jack says. "But I didn't worry because I give it up to God."

His younger sister, Lena, was in fourth grade. She wasn't so easily comforted.

"I was worried. Like she was going to like, maybe die from it, because it's happened to a few people that we know."

Julie Goodman reflects on how hard it was to tell them.

Read more
Business
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

White House Proposes Major Changes To Corporate Tax Code

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

President Obama traveled to Tennessee on Tuesday, another event in his recent push to emphasize jobs and the economy.

Politics
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Weiner Stays In Mayoral Race, Despite Calls To Drop Out

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

Despite mounting pressure from rivals and even former supporters, Anthony Weiner is giving no indication that he'll drop out of New York City's race for mayor. Recent events — including a Quinnipiac poll showing that a majority of New York City voters want him to make a quick exit — have made his uphill battle even steeper.

Law
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Bradley Manning Acquitted Of Most Serious Charge

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

A military judge has acquitted Army Pvt. Bradley Manning of the most serious charge against him — aiding the enemy — but found him guilty of 19 criminal charges including violation of the Espionage Act and theft of government property. Manning was accused of the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history after he passed thousands of war documents and diplomatic cables to the website WikiLeaks.

Author Interviews
3:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

Human sexuality researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson Masters, shown in San Francisco in 1972.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:40 pm

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their groundbreaking and controversial research into the physiology of human sexuality. Instead of just asking people about their sex lives, Masters and Johnson actually observed volunteers engaging in self-stimulation and sexual intercourse. Changes throughout their bodies during arousal were measured with medical equipment.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:29 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

A Bit Of Thought Makes Finding Out Medical Risks Less Scary

Angelina Jolie took a genetic test to find out her risk of breast cancer, and had a preventive double mastectomy.
Alastair Grant PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:39 pm

Would you want to know your risk of getting heart disease? Diabetes? Or an inherited form of breast cancer?

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:12 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Report: MIT Didn't Target Swartz; Missed 'Wider Background'

Internet activist Aaron Swartz at a rally in January 2012.
Daniel J. Sieradski Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 2:42 pm

In a long-awaited chronicle of its involvement in the prosecution of the late Internet activist Aaron Swartz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology officials released a 180-page report saying administrators never "targeted" the programmer and committed no wrongdoing. But the report raises questions about existing university policies and whether MIT should have stepped in to actively support Swartz, rather than take its "position of neutrality."

Read more
The Salt
12:45 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Is The Way To Tech Workers' Loyalty Through Their Stomachs?

Ari Dvorin was hired in May as the first corporate chef at SpareFoot, a startup in Austin, Texas. Here, Dvorin cuts suckling pig for a mockumentary SpareFoot made.
Jenny Zhang Courtesy of SpareFoot

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 3:01 pm

The dazzling array of food options at the Googleplex campus in Mountain View, Calif. — 25 cafes at last count — is the much-cited example of tech world food perks. And you can peruse the menus at Airbnb and Facebook to get a taste of an equally high bar for not just free food, but worldly food that is designed to delight and fuel employees to work better and harder.

Read more
Law
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

What's Behind Falling Incarceration Rates?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we'll talk about elections set for Zimbabwe, where 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to win yet another term despite - or maybe because of - what many people call an increasingly abusive dictatorial style of government. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes. But first, we want to talk about an issue that's become a central focus of activists in this country - it's the incarceration rate.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Widows: Getting Your Kids On Board With The Dating Game

Dating after losing a spouse can come with a world of complications. And if you're a parent, it can be especially hard to explain new relationships to children. Two moms who lost their husbands share how they ventured back into dating and how their children reacted.

Pages