National

Shots - Health News
3:25 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Nurse Charged With Assisting In Her Father's Death

Barbara Mancini with her father, Joe Yourshaw.
Barbara Mancini via Compassion & Choices

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:22 pm

A Philadelphia nurse has been charged with assisted suicide for allegedly providing her 93-year-old father with a lethal dose of morphine.

Authorities say Barbara Mancini, 57, told a hospice nurse and a police officer on Feb. 7 that she provided a vial of morphine to her father, Joe Yourshaw, to hasten his death.

Mancini and her attorneys acknowledge she handed the medication to her father, but maintain she never said she intended to help him end his life and was only trying to help her father ease his pain — an act they say is legally protected, even if it causes death.

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Monkey See
1:34 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Coffee Break: People Arguing And Counting And Singing And Getting Gassed Edition

iStockphoto.com

* If you're anywhere near Winston-Salem, please note that Tonya Pinkins, whose chops are so considerable that I don't entirely know where to start with her amazingness, so just Google her, is in cabaret thereabouts, as part of the biennial National Black Theatre Festival. This is a thing that makes me want to go to North Carolina. [Winston-Salem Journal]

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All Tech Considered
1:01 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Weekly Innovation: A Better Travel Neck Pillow

The Nap Anywhere is a new, portable head-support pillow created by a Virginia-based physician.
Courtesy of Nap Anywhere

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Previously we've featured the sink-urinal and Smart Bedding.

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Shots - Health News
12:28 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

More Moms Are Breast-Feeding, But Many Babies Still Miss Out

More than three quarters of new babies get at least a start at breast-feeding, according to the CDC.
iStockphoto.com

Three quarters of new mothers gave breast-feeding a try in 2010, and mothers are sticking with breast-feeding longer, according to federal data.

Almost 50 percent of babies are still being breast-fed at least sometime at 6 months of age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's up from 35 percent in 2000.

The number of babies breast-feeding at 12 months also rose, from 16 percent in 2000 to 27 percent in 2010. Go moms!

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Code Switch
12:26 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Consumer Groups On The Lookout For Immigration Scams

A line waits outside the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Los Angeles.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:54 pm

Talk about immigration reform on Capitol Hill this summer has raised the hopes of many unauthorized immigrants around the country.

It's also raised the fears of consumer advocates worried about scam artists who promise immigrants they can help them secure legal status.

Eduardo Flores, an unauthorized immigrant from Honduras, wasn't promised immigration documents, but he did place his trust and $4,000 with a man who said he was an immigration attorney.

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Education
11:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

'Separate And Unequal': Racial Divides In Higher Ed

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, during the height of the crack epidemic in the 1980s, many doctors despaired that children born to crack addicts were doomed to grim lives as adults, if they managed to grow up all. But, now there's new research that's challenging that assumption. We'll hear more about that just ahead. First, though, we want to talk about a new study that challenges other assumptions about the opportunities extended to African-American and Latino students.

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Beauty Shop
11:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Do Women Have A Responsibility When Men Misbehave?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Health
11:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Decades Later, Drugs Didn't Hold 'Crack Babies' Back

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to talk about another body of research that's also challenging assumptions, very old assumptions about the effects of cocaine addiction. During the crack epidemic of the 1980s and '90s, healthcare workers feared that children born to addicted mothers had little hope for a healthy future. But a newly released study suggests that initial concerns about so-called crack babies may have been misplaced, and that the biggest issue that could hurt these kids was not drug exposure, but poverty.

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Health Care
11:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

New Health Exchanges: What You Need To Know

On October 1st, online health insurance exchanges open up as part of the Affordable Care Act. Kaiser Health News' Mary Agnes Carey speaks to host Michel Martin about what will change, and how you can prepare for the roll-out.

Monkey See
10:58 am
Wed July 31, 2013

10 Awkward, Unexpected, Or Otherwise Curious Press Tour Moments

Actors Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul speak onstage during the Breaking Bad panel on July 26.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

The Television Critics Association press tour, a two-week event in which press conference after press conference parades through a hotel ballroom, is about half over, so it's time for a few stories.

In a room of 250 or so reporters and a rotating set of actors, producers, and executives, there's likely to be a conversation here and there that perhaps doesn't go as everyone involved was expecting. After all, I've already been to 57 panel discussions or presentations (according to our transcripts list), and we have a week to go.

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Shots - Health News
7:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Last Person To Get Smallpox Dedicated His Life To Ending Polio

Ali Maow Maalin said he avoided getting the smallpox vaccine as a young man because he was afraid of needles. He didn't want others to make the same mistake with polio.
Courtesy of the World Health Organization

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:13 pm

So far, the human race has eliminated just one disease in history: smallpox. But it's on the cusp of adding a second virus — polio — to that list.

One special man in Somalia was at the battlefront of both eradication efforts. He died last week of a sudden illness at age 59.

Ali Maow Maalin was the last member of the general public — worldwide — to catch smallpox. And he spent the past decade working to end polio in Somalia.

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U.S.
3:12 am
Wed July 31, 2013

In Florida, A Clash Over Exhuming Bodies At Reform School

Metal crosses mark graves at the cemetery of the former Arthur Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Investigators in Florida using ground-penetrating radar and soil samples say there are nearly 100 unmarked graves on the grounds.
Michael Spooneybarger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:32 pm

Researchers at the University of South Florida are fighting with the state over access to the grounds of a now-closed reform school.

For decades, the Dozier School for Boys was notorious for the harsh treatment boys received there. Now, a forensic anthropologist and her team want permission to exhume dozens of bodies they found in unmarked graves, but are meeting resistance from state officials.

White House Boys

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The Salt
5:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Despite Legal Blow, New York To Keep Up Sugary Drink Fight

On Tuesday, a state appeals court called New York City's ban on supersized soda unconstitutional.
Allison Joyce Getty Images News

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:01 pm

A state appeals court on Tuesday rejected New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's attempt to limit the size of sugary beverages sold in his city. But in a statement, Bloomberg and the city's top lawyer, Michael Cardozo, called the decision a "temporary setback" and vowed to appeal.

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Shots - Health News
5:40 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston.
Carrie Feibel KUHF

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:08 pm

Jack Goodman remembers the day his mother, Julie, told the family she had colorectal cancer. He was in seventh grade.

"They just sat us down on the futon in the living room, or the couch that we had, and told us," Jack says. "But I didn't worry because I give it up to God."

His younger sister, Lena, was in fourth grade. She wasn't so easily comforted.

"I was worried. Like she was going to like, maybe die from it, because it's happened to a few people that we know."

Julie Goodman reflects on how hard it was to tell them.

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Business
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

White House Proposes Major Changes To Corporate Tax Code

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

President Obama traveled to Tennessee on Tuesday, another event in his recent push to emphasize jobs and the economy.

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