National

News
7:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

This Fountain Of Youth Has A Little Extra Zing

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

ORSON WELLES: Of course, there are all sorts of fountains. Some are beautiful, some are purely mythological. Some are silly fountains. Of course, the silliest of all, is the fountain of youth. Old Ponce de Leon thought that one was somewhere down in Florida.

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

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News
7:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

At Henry Ford's 150th Birthday Party

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 12:31 pm

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

Amid all the gloom in Detroit, some people were celebrating this weekend. It's the 150th anniversary of the birth of Henry Ford, the founder of the Ford Motor Company. There was a big party at the Ford Stage in Dearborn, and people gathered there to remember the inventor who, by the way, was known for his passion for folk dance. Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton sent us this audio postcard.

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Theater
6:18 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Wallace Shawn: From 'Toy Story' Dino To Highbrow Playwright

Wallace Shawn (from left), Larry Pine and Deborah Eisenberg make up the cast of The Designated Mourner. Written by Shawn and directed by Andre Gregory, the Public Theater show is a product of one of the longest collaborations in the history of the American theater.
Joan Marcus Courtesy The Public Theater

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 12:31 pm

Wallace Shawn is famous for his career as an actor, but over the past four decades he has written a handful of plays that are intellectually demanding and rarely produced. His characters tell stories in monologues, rather than acting them out onstage, and they use cascades of words to make dizzying arguments.

His work is being showcased at New York's Public Theater this season. A revival of The Designated Mourner opened July 21 and the American premier of another Shawn play, Grasses of a Thousand Colors, will open this fall.

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News
5:40 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Reinvigorating A Detroit Neighborhood, Block By Block

Woodward Avenue runs through Midtown, a Detroit neighborhood that is reviving in the midst of the larger city's decline. In the background is downtown Detroit.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 12:31 pm

The debt-laden city of Detroit has been an incubator for new strategies in urban revitalization, including a downtown People Mover, casinos, urban farms, artist colonies and large scale down-sizing.

In the wake of the city's bankruptcy, many in the community are thinking small.

Just outside of downtown Detroit is a neighborhood called Midtown. Like many hip, urban neighborhoods, it's got hipsters on fixed geared bikes, yoga studios, boutiques for dogs.

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The Two-Way
8:17 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Gunman, Six Others, Killed In Florida Apartment Standoff

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 9:05 am

A Florida gunman seized hostages and killed six people in an eight-hour standoff at an apartment complex that ended early Saturday when a SWAT team stormed the building and fatally shot the assailant.

The deadly incident occurred in Hialeah, a town just a few miles north of Miami. Police were quoted by The Associated Press as saying the bodies of three women and two men were found at the scene and that another man had been killed nearby. Two hostages were unharmed.

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Sports
7:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

'You Gotta Keep Smashin' And Smashin' And Smashin'!'

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's summertime, and on weekend nights all across the country, that means demolition derby time - cars bashing cars for the pure thrill of it. Charles Lane from member station WSHU recently went to a demo on New York's Long Island, the legendary home of the demolition derby. He brought back this audio postcard.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Fire it up (unintelligible).

CHARLES LANE, BYLINE: A white four-door Chevy Impala. It's got graffiti writing down the side that says Misery Machine, and it's number 86.

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Health
7:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Why Do People Still Die Of Heart Disease?

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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Monkey See
7:03 am
Sat July 27, 2013

A Comic-Con Diary: The Final Day

A lone, sad stormtrooper descends an escalator.
JC Moya Courtesy Glen Weldon

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 5:55 am

Monkey See contributor/longtime nerd Glen Weldon recently attended San Diego Comic-Con. He kept a diary during one of the largest media events in the world.

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The Salt
6:38 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Tucson Food Bank Helps The Needy Grow Their Own Food

Food bank client Jamie Senik takes a break near her garden plot sponsored by the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. She grows food for herself and her diabetic mother.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:15 pm

Food banks around the country face growing demand, despite improvements in the economy. Many families are still underemployed and struggling. So some food banks are looking for more permanent ways to address hunger, beyond handing out food.

One of them is the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona, based in Tucson. Among the many programs it runs is Las Milpitas de Cottonwood, a community farm located in one of the city's lower-income neighborhoods.

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News
5:47 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Emergency Summit On Urban Violence Opens In Chicago

A sidewalk memorial in Chicago remembers Eugene Clark, 25, who was shot and killed last weekend. In the same weekend, the city had at least 6 people killed and 22 wounded by gunfire. This weekend, the Congressional Black Caucus held a summit in Chicago to discuss violence in urban areas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

Rep. Robin Kelly, one of the hosts of the urban violence summit in Chicago, said at the outset Friday that this wouldn't be just another summit.

"Maybe just some of you are tired of having your leaders hold summits that are long on talk and short on action," she told attendees. "Today's summit aims to be different."

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Food
5:46 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Pie-Deprived New Orleans Roots For Bakery, A Year After Fire

Jill Pasquarella (right) pours powdered sugar on Brandon Connelly, who dressed as a baker from Hubig's Pies, during Mardi Gras in New Orleans in February.
Chris Granger The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

Almost any kind of comeback gets New Orleans excited, since the city lost so much in the flood after Hurricane Katrina. That goes especially for food.

One year ago Saturday, New Orleans lost a beloved brand when Hubig's pie bakery burned to the ground. The hand-held, fruit-filled crescents, fried golden-brown, had been delivered fresh to more than 1,000 local stores each morning.

Pie fans have come out in droves to support the company. But it takes more than T-shirts and fond memories to restart a business from scratch.

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Shots - Health News
5:15 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

The roots of obesity are complex and include genetics and other factors beyond individual choice, research shows.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:48 pm

Don't try to pretend your gibes and judgments of the overweight people in your life are for their own good. Florida researchers have evidence that discriminating against fat people only makes them fatter.

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Can Software That Predicts Crime Pass Constitutional Muster?

Jeff Brantingham, creator of PredPol, demonstrates computer-generated "predictive policing" zones at the Los Angeles Police Department Unified Command Post in Los Angeles last year.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:01 pm

Typically, police arrive at the scene of a crime after it occurs. But rather than send cops to yesterday's crime, a new trend in law enforcement is using computers to predict where tomorrow's crimes will be — and then try to head them off.

The software uses past statistics to project where crime is moving. Police in Los Angeles say it's worked well in predicting property crimes there. Now Seattle is about to expand it for use in predicting gun violence.

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Law
4:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Cleveland Kidnapper Pleads Guilty, Avoiding Death Penalty

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Cleveland, there will be no trial for the man accused of kidnapping three women and holding them captive in his house for about a decade. Today, Ariel Castro pleaded guilty to more than 900 charges in exchange for avoiding the death penalty. Here's Nick Castele from member station WCPN.

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Around the Nation
4:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Trayvon Martin's Mother Finds New Role As An Activist

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The mother of Trayvon Martin has spoken widely about the killing of her son. And today, she moved from the role of grieving parent to civil rights advocate. In Philadelphia, Sybrina Fulton addressed the nation's oldest civil rights group, the National Urban League. She called on members to join her in making sure what happened to her son doesn't happen to other children. NPR's Greg Allen has this report.

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