National

Food
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

When Asian And Latin Food Collide: Spicy, Tasty Or Confused?

Green beans with peanuts and chile de arbol
Courtesy Pati Jinich

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:20 pm

Asian-Americans and Latinos trace their roots half a world away from each other — literally. But their cultures, and especially the foods they love, have more in common than you might think. These days, they're colliding in new and interesting ways – from Korean barbecue taco trucks to finer dining.

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Television
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

What's The 'Best Daym Takeout' In America?

Food critic and YouTube sensation Daymon 'Daym' Patterson travels the country to find the best takeout spots. He eats in the front seat of his car - when the food is hottest and freshest. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with him about his new Travel channel show Best Daym Takeout.

Race
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

If You Have To Ask If It's Racist, It Probably Is

Talking about race can be difficult. But not for Andrew Ti, creator of the Yo, Is This Racist? blog and podcast. He bluntly takes on questions about racial sensitivity. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks Ti if he thinks he's helping or hurting the national conversation.

Music
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Hip-Hop Sign Language Is Hard Work

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE: This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, having honest conversations about race can require a lot of patience, but the writer behind the "Yo, Is This Racist?" blog says there's value in getting angry and even profane in those debates.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:24 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Is Cancer A Gift?

Cagri Ozgur iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:02 pm

There's a gift in cancer. It says so right on page 203 of Greg Anderson's book Cancer: 50 Essential Things to Do (2013 edition; first published 1993). Anderson quotes the singer Olivia Newton-John as saying this about her "journey through breast cancer": "I see it [cancer] as a gift. I know it sounds strange. But I don't think I would have grown in the areas I did without this experience."

Then Anderson urges his readers to "Seek the gift in cancer. It's there."

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Monkey See
9:07 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Keith Olbermann Talks Sports, ESPN, And The Secret Identity Anthony Weiner Stole

Keith Olbermann speaks onstage during the Olbermann panel at the ESPN portion of the 2013 Summer Television Critics Association press tour.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

"Carlos ... Danger," says Keith Olbermann with utter awe, and arcs his hand across his field of vision.

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Shots - Health News
7:48 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Hackers Track Their Vital Signs. Sounds Cool, But TMI?

Christopher Hopkins feels amazing, and he's got the data to prove it.
Courtesy of Christopher Hopkins

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:55 pm

Large-scale data mining in health care sounds scary, but dial back that fear for a minute. What about mining your own data to make informed decisions about your day-to-day health?

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu July 25, 2013

George H.W. Bush Shaves Head In Support Of Ill Toddler

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Former President George H.W. Bush has a new summer 'do. He shaved his head to show support for the son of one of his Secret Service agents. Two-year-old Patrick lost his hair from leukemia treatments. Bush and his wife lost a three-year-old daughter to leukemia nearly 60 years ago. A photo just released shows Patrick perched on Bush's knee with matching bald heads, blue shirts, and khakis. Bill Clinton tweeted: 41, you look great. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:56 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Believe In Fortune Cookie Predictions? After This, You Might

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

OK. Next time you open a fortune cookie, you might want to give the message careful consideration. Last week, after dinner out with his wife, William Johnson cracked open a fortune cookie. The little piece of paper inside told him: You will soon come into a lot of gold. The Southwick, Massachusetts man went out the next day, he bought a lottery ticket. He scratched it off, and the prize wasn't gold, but he could use it to buy a lot. He won a million dollars.

Around the Nation
5:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Making Sense Of Cleveland's Good And Bad News

The new Cleveland Convention Center is hosting its first major event, the National Senior Games.
Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:13 pm

As Cleveland embraces national attention for everything from its booming arts and culinary scene to its redevelopment plans, it struggles with recent high-profile crimes. Some residents and tourists are left with news whiplash as they try to figure out what these diverging storylines say about the city.

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Code Switch
3:41 am
Thu July 25, 2013

After Years Of Violence, L.A.'s Watts Sees Crime Subside

Los Angeles police officers take a break during a basketball game with residents of the Nickerson Gardens housing project in July 2011. Violent crime at Nickerson Gardens and two nearby housing projects has fallen by almost half since 2010.
Thomas Watkins AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:48 am

On most weeknights, in the middle of his shift, Los Angeles police officer Keith Mott trades his gun and uniform for a T-shirt and shorts, and heads to a park in the Watts neighborhood of South Los Angeles. He's there to coach 7- and 8-year-old boys on the Pop Warner Pee Wee football team, the Watts Bears.

The kids come from three nearby housing projects: Jordan Downs, Nickerson Gardens and Imperial Courts. The park was carefully chosen. It's a neutral site for local gangs. Otherwise, most of the Bears' parents wouldn't allow them to come and play.

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Environment
3:38 am
Thu July 25, 2013

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Canals created for navigation and oil and gas pipelines cut through the marsh off the coast of Louisiana, seen in 2010.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:49 am

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost roughly as much land as makes up the state of Delaware.

"If you put the state of Delaware between New Orleans and the ocean, we wouldn't need any levees at all," says John Barry, vice president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. "There is this large buffer of land that has disappeared, and that buffer makes New Orleans much more vulnerable to hurricanes."

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The Two-Way
7:25 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Cyclist's Felony Manslaughter Plea First Of Its Kind In U.S.

A bicyclist who struck and killed a pedestrian in San Francisco last year has pleaded guilty to felony vehicular manslaughter, prosecutors announced Wednesday. The conviction is said to be the first of its kind in the nation.

The accident happened when 37-year-old Chris Bucchere rode through several red lights and struck 71-year-old Sutchi Hui and his wife, who were crossing the intersection.

Hui died four days later from his injuries.

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Business
5:23 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Full-Time Vs. Part-Time Workers: Restaurants Weigh Obamacare

The California Tortilla chain is one company still deciding how to react to the new health care requirements for business, set to take effect next year.
John Ydstie NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:21 pm

Many businesses that don't offer health insurance to all their employees breathed a sigh of relief earlier this month when they learned they'd have an extra year to comply with the new health care law or face stiff penalties.

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On Aging
5:23 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Move Over Nursing Homes — There's Something Different

There are no strict schedules at Green House homes, so resident Charles Tyler, 72, is free to stay in his recliner in the living room during mealtimes.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:21 pm

One thing just about everyone dreads as they age is the possibility of ending up in a nursing home. We all think we know what that's like: sharing a room with strangers, sitting slumped in a wheelchair all day, rigid schedules, bad smells. And for more than 1 million Americans, this is home. But there's an effort to change all that, and it's known as The Green House Project.

In the past 10 years, more than 140 of these alternative, nonprofit nursing homes have been built in 24 states.

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