National

Race
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

What's On The National Urban League's Agenda This Year?

Jobs are the focus of this year's National Urban League Conference in Philadelphia. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with President and CEO Marc Morial, about how the League has progressed on that front, and asks about the biggest issues facing African-Americans today.

Health
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

MERS Virus Update

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an illness caused by a newly discovered virus in the same family as SARS. Most of the documented cases have come from Saudi Arabia, which has seen a 54 percent mortality rate in those patients. Martin Cetron, director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the emerging virus.

Politics
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Should Congress Stop 'Drawing Lines In The Sand'?

Guest host Celeste Headlee gets a wrap of the week's political news with journalist Callie Crossley and conservative commentator Lenny McAllister. They talk about President Obama's push to get the economy back on track, and the battle over the President's health care law.

Monkey See
11:01 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Mike Tyson And The Questions Not Asked

Director Spike Lee and Mike Tyson speak onstage at a panel in Beverly Hills on Thursday.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 11:53 am

HBO's press tour presentations this year were quieter than they've sometimes been. They don't have a big, splashy new drama series to talk about — in part because they still make a limited amount of original programming and don't have a lot of room when they're happy with how things are going. They have a comedy series with Stephen Merchant, but since we haven't seen it, most of the questions touched in one way or another on how tall he is.

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Why Is The High Wire Impossible To Resist?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Philippe Petit's TEDTalk

High-wire artist Philippe Petit tells the story of his 1974 tightrope walk between the Twin Towers and explains his lifelong fascination with pushing himself to the limit.

About Philippe Petit

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Lincoln Memorial Closed After Being Splattered With Paint

A police officer stands near the statue of the 16th president at the Lincoln Memorial, which was splattered with paint Friday morning.
Shawn Thew EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:38 pm

"The chamber of the Lincoln Memorial is shut down Friday morning because of vandalism. U.S. Park Police tell WTOP the Lincoln statue and the floor inside the memorial was splattered with green paint," the radio station reported. "They think the vandalism occurred at about 1:30 a.m."

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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Fri July 26, 2013

San Diego Mayor Says He Will Enter Treatment Clinic

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner (D) on Thursday.
Sam Hodgson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:19 pm

Update at 3:07 p.m. ET. Entering Treatment Clinic:

The besieged San Diego Mayor Bob Filner will not resign, but during a press conference, just minutes ago, said he "must take responsibility" for his actions and will therefore be entering a "behavior consulting counseling clinic," beginning August 5.

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Shots - Health News
2:58 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Don't Blame Your Lousy Night's Sleep On The Moon — Yet

Anton-Marlot iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:10 pm

From madness to seizures, to crime and lack of sleep, people have long blamed the full moon for a range of problems. Research, on the other hand, has found little evidence over the years to support these anecdotal accounts of the moon's powers over the human body and brain.

But scientists in Switzerland decided to look again at one of those putative effects — disturbed sleep — and were surprised to see there might be something to the claim after all.

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StoryCorps
10:03 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For A Young Paramedic, Saving A Life Meant A Lifelong Bond

Rowan Allen (right) saved Bryan Lindsay's life in 1991, after an accident left Bryan, then 7, with a severe head injury.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:33 am

Twenty-two years ago this summer, Bryan Lindsay was riding his bike when he was hit by a van and almost killed. He was 7 years old.

Rowan Allen was the paramedic on the scene that day. "When the call came in, it was just before my shift ended that day," Rowan recalls on a visit to StoryCorps in New York. "The first instinct was, 'Oh man, right before we get off.' And then the dispatcher comes back on the air and he says, 'Child struck.' That just changes everything. And luckily, we were just a couple blocks away.

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Code Switch
6:39 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

After Zimmerman Verdict, Activists Face A New, Tougher Fight

Protesters hold hands in the rotunda outside Florida Gov. Rick Scott's office after it closed for the evening last Friday.
Phil Sears AP

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 11:24 am

Phillip Agnew was blindsided by the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. The decision came down late on a Saturday night. Agnew was expecting the neighborhood watchman who killed Trayvon Martin to be found guilty.

Agnew, 28, leads a group of young activists called the Dream Defenders, which formed in Florida last year in the weeks following Trayvon's shooting death. It was one of the many groups that sprouted up in cities across the country in response to the shooting.

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Shots - Health News
6:19 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Why Mosquitoes Love Me, And Other Mysteries Revealed

The mosquitoes that feed on people are attracted to over 300 gases and other compounds emitted by human skin.
CDC Public Health Image Library

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:44 pm

Come summertime, some of us here at Shots are reminded, as we lounge on decks and venture into overgrown gardens, that we are irresistible to mosquitoes. As we gripe about our itchy, pocked limbs, we can't help but wonder just why they unfailingly devour us and pass over our friends and loved ones. And when it comes to repellent, it's hard to tell just what works best.

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Around the Nation
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

N.C. Tries To Make Amends For Forced Sterilizations

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In the early 1900s, more than half of the states in the U.S. passed laws allowing people to be sterilized against their will. North Carolina's eugenics program was particularly aggressive. Some 7,600 men, women and children were sterilized often because they were poor or mentally ill.

Now, North Carolina has done more than any other state to make amends, as we hear from Julie Rose of member station WFAE.

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Education
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Common Core Could Be Disrupted As States Drop Out Of PARCC

In addition to Georgia, a handful of other states — Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, North Dakota, and Alabama — have dropped out of or scaled back their participation in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness in College and Career (PARCC) consortium. Florida's education commissioner is mulling a similar decision. We discuss what it could mean for the success of the standards.

Education
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Georgia The Latest State To Back Out Of K-12 PARCC Tests

This week, Georgia announced it is withdrawing from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness in College and Career (PARCC), one of two consortia developing standardized tests for the Common Core. The Core is the set of national K-12 education standards in math and English language arts that has been adopted by 46 states. Georgia officials say the cost of the tests is too high and many schools don't have the computer technology the tests would require.

Law
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Holder: DOJ Wants To Oversee Texas' Voting Laws Again

Attorney General Eric Holder has announced an aggressive new strategy in response to a Supreme Court ruling last month overturning a key part of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act. The Justice Department is starting in Texas, where it is asking a court to force the state to get federal approval before making any election changes - using a different part of the law.

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