National

Law
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Holder: DOJ Wants To Oversee Texas' Voting Laws Again

Attorney General Eric Holder has announced an aggressive new strategy in response to a Supreme Court ruling last month overturning a key part of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act. The Justice Department is starting in Texas, where it is asking a court to force the state to get federal approval before making any election changes - using a different part of the law.

Around the Nation
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Undocumented Immigrants With Criminal Records Face Uncertain Future

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

In all the current talk about helping 11 million undocumented immigrants come out of the shadows, there's typically broad agreement about who shouldn't get a path to legal residence: law breakers. There are lists of offenses that rule people out, whether it's under existing immigration law or under the immigration bill the Senate passed, or under President Obama's program to help the so-called Dreamers - the ones who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

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Politics
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Rep. Cole: Savings Need To Continue, But Compromise Is Possible

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This week, President Obama is travelling around the country talking up ideas to strengthen the middle class, but those ideas are given very little chance of passage in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives. Well, to hear their side, we turn now to Republican Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma, who's a member of the House Appropriations' Committee. Congressman Cole is also a deputy majority whip. Welcome back to the program.

REPRESENTATIVE TOM COLE: Robert, great to be with you.

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Law
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Federal Case Pits Wounded Warrior Against FBI

Former Army Ranger Justin Slaby is suing the FBI, claiming he was unfairly dismissed from agent training because of his prosthetic hand.
Courtesy of Butler & Harris

Army Ranger Justin Slaby served two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. While he was back in the U.S. preparing to deploy for a fourth tour, his left hand was blown off by a faulty grenade in a training accident. After being fitted with a state-of-the-art prosthesis, Slaby was encouraged by one of his doctors to try for a career in the FBI. What happened next has landed the ex-Ranger and the FBI in court and already tarnished the career of a high-ranking agent.

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The Salt
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Palm Oil In The Food Supply: What You Should Know

Much of the palm oil imported into the U.S. ends up in snack foods such as cookies, crackers and microwave popcorn.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:42 pm

Remember the battle over trans fats? Yeah, the fats that did our hearts no favors.

As we've reported, the push to get these cholesterol-raising fats out of the food supply has been pretty successful. And now most packaged snacks are labeled as having zero grams of trans fat.

So what are food manufacturers using instead? One alternative is palm oil. But it's not an ideal replacement.

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Business
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

U.S. Carmakers Are Riding High, But Detroit May Not Feel It

Jeff Caldwell, a chassis assembly line supervisor, checks a vehicle on the assembly line at the Chrysler Jefferson North Assembly plant in Detroit on May 8.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:19 pm

The news out of Detroit has been grim of late, but there are some bright spots coming from one corner of the Motor City. On Thursday, General Motors posted its 14th straight profitable quarter since emerging from bankruptcy. Ford announced its 16th consecutive profitable quarter Wednesday, and Chrysler is expected to offer good news soon as well.

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Around the Nation
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

N.C. Tries To Make Amends For Forced Sterilizations

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In the early 1900s, more than half of the states in the U.S. passed laws allowing people to be sterilized against their will. North Carolina's eugenics program was particularly aggressive. Some 7,600 men, women and children were sterilized often because they were poor or mentally ill.

Now, North Carolina has done more than any other state to make amends, as we hear from Julie Rose of member station WFAE.

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Education
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Common Core Could Be Disrupted As States Drop Out Of PARCC

In addition to Georgia, a handful of other states — Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, North Dakota, and Alabama — have dropped out of or scaled back their participation in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness in College and Career (PARCC) consortium. Florida's education commissioner is mulling a similar decision. We discuss what it could mean for the success of the standards.

Education
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Georgia The Latest State To Back Out Of K-12 PARCC Tests

This week, Georgia announced it is withdrawing from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness in College and Career (PARCC), one of two consortia developing standardized tests for the Common Core. The Core is the set of national K-12 education standards in math and English language arts that has been adopted by 46 states. Georgia officials say the cost of the tests is too high and many schools don't have the computer technology the tests would require.

The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

North Carolina Set To Compensate Forced Sterilization Victims

Sterilization victim Lela Dunston, 63 (seated front), following a meeting of the Governor's Eugenics Compensation Task Force in North Carolina in 2012.
Karen Tam AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:31 pm

North Carolina could become the first state to compensate people who were forcibly sterilized in programs across the country that began during the Great Depression and continued for decades, targeting individuals deemed feeble-minded or otherwise unfit.

In a proposed budget, lawmakers have set aside $10 million for one-time payments to an estimated 1,500 people still alive who were part of a state program that sterilized 7,600 men, women and children from 1929 to 1974. The amount of each payout would be determined by how many people came forward.

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Code Switch
4:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Key Witness Against Emmett Till's Killers Led A Quiet Life

Willie Reed (right) testified against the men accused of murdering 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955. He changed his last name to Louis after fleeing to Chicago and hardly spoke of the trial.
Charles Knoblock AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:43 pm

Willie Louis may be one of the most celebrated but least-known figures in a pivotal point in American history: He testified against the men accused of kidnapping and murdering 14-year-old Emmett Till. He died July 18, but his wife, Juliet, announced his death this week.

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Health Care
1:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For Bioethicist With Ailing Spouse, End-Of-Life Issues Hit Home

Margaret Battin's husband, Brooke Hopkins, was left quadriplegic after he collided with an oncoming bicycle while cycling down a hill in Salt Lake City.
Courtesy of The New York Times

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:14 pm

After writing books and essays about end-of-life issues, and advocating for the right to die, bioethicist Margaret Battin is wrestling with the issue in her own family. Her husband, Brooke Hopkins, an English professor at the University of Utah, where she also teaches, broke his neck in a bicycle accident in 2008, leaving him with quadriplegia and dependent on life support technology. In order to breathe, he requires a ventilator some of the time and a diaphragmatic pacer all the time. He receives his nutrition through a feeding tube.

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Shots - Health News
12:10 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones

A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Jonathan Saruk International Medical Corps

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:24 pm

  • Listen to midwife Emily Slocum describe delivering babies in the dark, with no running water.

In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.

Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.

Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives' jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.

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Economy
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Economics: Growing 'From The Middle Class Out'

President Obama is putting out a message of economic revitalization, starting with the middle class. Cecilia Munoz, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, explains why the executive branch is pushing the message now. She speaks with guest host Celeste Headleee.

Food
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

When Asian And Latin Food Collide: Spicy, Tasty Or Confused?

Green beans with peanuts and chile de arbol
Courtesy Pati Jinich

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:20 pm

Asian-Americans and Latinos trace their roots half a world away from each other — literally. But their cultures, and especially the foods they love, have more in common than you might think. These days, they're colliding in new and interesting ways – from Korean barbecue taco trucks to finer dining.

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