National

Race
11:56 am
Mon July 15, 2013

What Does Race Have To Do With It?

Host Michel talks about the role race played — or didn't play — in the criminal trial of George Zimmerman. She speaks with Corey Dade, contributing editor for TheRoot.com, and Roger L. Simon, founder of PJ Media.

Law
11:56 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Inside The Zimmerman Verdict

The verdict in the George Zimmerman trial raises questions about the legal strategies, the strength of the evidence, and the role of the legal system in addressing social issues. Host Michel Martin talks about all this with Georgetown law professor Paul Butler and TheRoot.com writer Jenee Desmond Harris.

Monkey See
10:59 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Morning Shots: The Does Your Garden Make You Think Of Carrion? Edition

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:02 pm

In London, they're breathlessly anticipating a royal bundle of joy. Here in the capital of the former colonies, we await the blooming of a gigantic flower that smells like rotting meat. Because that's how we do. [The Washington Post]

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Code Switch
5:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

The Talk: What Did You Tell Your Kids After The Zimmerman Verdict?

Demonstrators gather outside the Seminole County Courthouse Saturday in Sanford, Fla. The verdict in the trial of George Zimmerman was announced late that night.
John Raoux AP

A few weeks ago, Levar Burton, the actor best-known for his role as Geordi LaForge in Star Trek and the host of the long-running kids' show Reading Rainbow, appeared on a CNN roundtable and offered up a sobering how-to on driving while black:

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Around the Nation
5:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Zimmerman Verdict Fuels Fight Over Racial Injustice

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:55 am

Over the weekend, a jury in Sanford, Fla., found George Zimmerman not guilty of charges that he committed murder or manslaughter in the death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. While it closed a criminal case the nation has followed for nearly a year and a half, it's adding to the conversation about race and equal justice.

Sports
5:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

3 Sprinters Test Positive for Banned Substances

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:50 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Track and field is a sport of power and speed, and also one with a checkered history when it comes to performance-enhancing drugs. In the past, it has seen Olympians like Ben Johnson and Marion Jones stripped of medals in doping scandals. Now yesterday, the sport hit a new low. Three well-known athletes from sprinting powers Jamaica and the United States announced that they had tested positive for banned drugs.

Joining me to talk about this is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Hey, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, David.

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Around the Nation
5:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Norwalk, Conn., Debates Building Project In Floodplain

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's talk about another kind of tragedy: natural disasters. Severe storms seem to becoming more frequently, and this is raising questions once again about the wisdom of building in coastal flood-prone areas. It's an issue for private builders and public officials, like city leaders in Norwalk, Connecticut. They want to upgrade and old housing project in a flood plain using federal dollars. From WSHU, Kaomi Goetz has that story.

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Around the Nation
5:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Rail Industry Vows To Learn From Fiery Accident In Canada

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the Quebec town of Lac-Megantic, a grim search continues this morning amid the ash and debris left after a train carrying oil crashed into the town. As investigators try to figure out what caused the fiery accident, the question has emerged across the border: Could the same thing happen here in the U.S.? NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 am
Mon July 15, 2013

BPA-Free Plastics Going On Trial In Texas

PlastiPure helps manufacturers create water bottles and other plastic products that have no estrogenic activity.
PlastiPure

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 10:05 am

Scientists and lawyers are scheduled to debate the safety of certain "BPA-free" plastics this week in a U.S. District Court in Austin, Texas.

At issue is whether a line of plastic resins marketed by Eastman Chemical contains chemicals that can act like the hormone estrogen, and perhaps cause health problems.

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Around the Nation
3:02 am
Mon July 15, 2013

A Peek Inside A Once Top Secret Spot In Atomic Age History

Take a tour of the Hanford site, a nuclear production complex in Richland, Wash., and you'll see the hundreds of mechanical water pressure gauges wired to the process tubes inside the core. Tour guide Paul Vinther warns that bumping these gauges could throw off the readings enough to trigger a an emergency shutdown of the reactor.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:40 am

People tend to remember that the atomic bomb was developed at Los Alamos, N.M., and Oak Ridge, Tenn., but they often forget about a third nuclear production complex — the Hanford Site in Richland, Wash. It's where they built the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor.

The "B Reactor" is a windowless, cinder block hulk out in the middle of nowhere. You might mistake it for an abandoned cement plant. But inside, it's a lovingly preserved time capsule of the Atomic Age. If you're lucky, your guide will be one of the people who worked here when the place was still new.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Patients Seek A Different Approach To Hip Replacement Surgery

Michael Pagliaro, left, laughs with Paul Scattaretico at the Muzic Store Inc. in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., as Pagliaro picks up instruments for his rental business. Before Pagliaro had a hip replacement, pain made it difficult to work.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:10 am

Every year more than a quarter of a million Americans have total hip replacement surgery. It's almost always a successful operation that frees patients from what's often described as disabling pain.

But in recent years, there's been lots of discussion on the Internet about "anterior approach" hip replacement, a surgical technique that's different than the standard procedure. It's one that proponents say can lead to quicker recovery, three to four weeks compared to six to eight weeks for typical surgery.

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Pop Culture
10:35 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Remembering Cory Monteith — Not Finn Hudson In 'Glee'

Cory Monteith, who played Finn in the television series Glee, was found dead Saturday in a hotel room in Canada. He was 31.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:29 pm

The Cory Monteith that most Americans knew wasn't Cory Monteith at all. He was Finn Hudson, the high school football star turned Glee club member, whose singing talents were discovered in the shower during the musical comedy's pilot episode on Fox TV.

But outside of a love for drumming, Monteith said, the character on the hit show wasn't him.

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Law
4:49 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Pennsylvania's Voter ID Law Gets Its Day In Court

The Penndot Drivers License Center in Butler, Pa., displays signs promoting the requirement for voters to show an acceptable photo ID at the polls. On Monday, a judge will rule on the constitutionality of the state's controversial voter ID law.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 11:13 pm

Pennsylvania's voter ID law will be back in state court Monday after more than a year of legal limbo. A state judge will decide whether the 2012 law — which hasn't been enforced — violates the state's constitution.

The measure requires voters to show a particular state-issued photo ID before casting ballots. Last week, civil rights advocates like the NAACP's John Jordan railed against the requirement.

"It's a ploy to take votes away from people who deserve them — veterans, seniors, students, people with disabilities, people of color and hard-working folk," Jordan said.

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Arts & Life
3:58 am
Sun July 14, 2013

These Stormtroopers' Galactic Mission: Comic-Con

Sam Newcomer, a member of the Southern California Garrison of the 501st Legion, marches as Darth Vader leading his Stormtroopers in the Rosemead Fourth of July parade.
Courtesy of Mark Edwards

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 12:12 pm

A short time ago, in a garage not so far away, Steve Leahy was having a problem with his armor. A tiny piece of plastic, maybe just a few millimeters wide, stuck out from the shin guard.

"I know it's a minor detail, and while you're wearing it, someone may never notice," Leahy says. "But I know it's there and I know it shouldn't be, so we like to put the effort in to make it as perfect as possible."

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Code Switch
3:24 am
Sun July 14, 2013

With Fla. Verdict, Is Protective Clothing Still Required?

Many families live in dread of standing in the shoes of Trayvon Martin's parents. His mother, Sybrina Fulton (second from left) and father, Tracy Martin, were in court Friday as a Florida jury began its deliberations.
Gary W. Green AP

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 4:00 am

"I'm ashamed at how long it took me to realize why so many people in my family have been consumed with looking church-ready when they step out the door regardless of time or day."

That Facebook quote came from Phyllis Fletcher, an African-American colleague at KUOW in Seattle. And it reminded me of something my sister once told me when a white friend teased her about taking too long to get ready when they went on joint shopping expeditions. "Why are you getting all dressed up? Just throw on some jeans, like me, and let's go."

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