National

The Salt
2:45 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Bands Aren't The Only Things That Incubate At Music Festivals

Customers line up for an ice cream van at the 2011 Glastonbury Music Festival in southwest England.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:04 pm

Coachella, the massive outdoor music festival that kicks off this weekend in Indio, Calif., has become an "incubator" not just for new bands, but for rising food entrepreneurs, according to a story in the San Jose Mercury News earlier this week.

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Shots - Health News
1:44 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

As New Flu Cases Rise In China, U.S. Steps Up Its Response

A child wears a mask near a closed section of a poultry market in Shanghai, where health workers detected the new bird flu, H7N9.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 2:23 pm

The toll from a new flu strain is mounting in China.

Forty-three people have been sickened and 11 have died from the virus, the World Health Organization said Friday.

The pace of infections has quickened over the past few days, with three to five cases reported daily.

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Barbershop
11:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Barbershop Guys Weigh In On 'Accidental Racist'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Red Meat's Heart Risk Goes Beyond The Fat

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira today. You know the phrase you are what you eat? Well, new research suggests a slight modification: Your gut bacteria are what you eat. And if you eat more red meat, for example, you'll nurture populations of microbes that like to eat red meat, too, which might not seem like a bad thing except that researchers have pinpointed a compound in red meat called L-carnitine that when broken down by gut bacteria might contribute to heart disease.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Looking To Nature For Antibiotic Inspirations

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. Later in the hour, a teenage science activist and the plight of the monarch butterfly. But first, researchers have developed a new way to fight antibiotic-resistant microbes by borrowing a trick from a longtime foe of the bacteria, the bacteria phage.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Down The Gullet: A Guided Tour Of Your Guts

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:03 pm

In Gulp. Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, science writer Mary Roach takes a journey through the gut, from the secret healing powers of saliva to the taxonomy of poop. Along the trip, she serves up odd medical anecdotes, such as the story of William Beaumont, an eccentric surgeon who once ate chicken from another man's stomach.

Shots - Health News
10:19 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Annals Of The Obvious: Women Way More Tired Than Men

DRB Images LLC iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:00 am

Feeling run down? Dog-tired?

Who isn't, right?

But who's more exhausted: men or women?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the answer, though it's one that you probably could have arrived at without a second's thought.

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NPR Story
10:03 am
Fri April 12, 2013

The Violence Within Us

This episode, TED speakers uncover surprising realities about violence.
Sascha Burkard iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 3:10 pm

Violence and brutality are grim realities of life. Are some of us born that way, or can anyone be pushed into committing acts of cruelty? In this hour, TED speakers explore the sinister side of human nature, and whether we're all capable of violence.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
10:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

What Does The Mind Of A Killer Look Like?

Jim Fallon's work analyzing the brains of psychopaths lead to a surprising personal discovery.
Michael Brands TED / Michael Brands

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:45 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Jim Fallon's TEDTalk

Psychopathic killers are the basis for some must-watch TV, but what really makes them tick? Neuroscientist Jim Fallon talks about brain scans and genetic analysis that may uncover the rotten wiring in the nature (and nurture) of murderers. In a too-strange-for-fiction twist, he shares a fascinating family history that makes his work chillingly personal.

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TED Radio Hour
10:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Why Do Good People Do Bad Things?

Philip Zimbardo explains his infamous Stanford Prison experiment at a TED conference.
TED

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:20 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Philip Zimbardo's TEDTalk

Philip Zimbardo knows how easy it is for nice people to turn bad. He also understands the flip side: how easy it is to be a hero, and how we can rise to the challenge.

About Philip Zimbardo

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TED Radio Hour
10:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Why Don't Domestic Violence Victims Leave?

Leslie Morgan Steiner shares her story of domestic abuse at TEDxRainier.
TED

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:45 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Leslie Morgan Steiner's TEDTalk

Leslie Morgan Steiner was in "crazy love" — that is, madly in love with a man who routinely abused her and threatened her life. Steiner tells the harrowing story of her relationship, correcting misconceptions many people hold about victims of domestic violence.

About Leslie Morgan Steiner

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Monkey See
9:13 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Mad Men,' Madmen And A Fond Farewell

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

With Trey out this week, we called upon one of our very favorite people, Barrie Hardymon, to join us. We start this week with a discussion of the two-hour season opener of Mad Men, which isn't dropping any major bombs about plot, I don't think, but which isn't tiptoeing either, so use your judgment. We talk about Stephen's first exposure to the much-honored series, the reasons why Barrie likes it better when it stays in the office, how things are changing as we cruise into the late '60s, and why Peggy is really just the best thing ever.

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Explosives Said To Be In Package Addressed To Sheriff Arpaio

Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio.
Laura Segall Reuters /Landov

Authorities in Arizona say a package addressed to controversial Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was safely destroyed Thursday after a test for explosive residue confirmed it "contained black powder," The Arizona Republic writes.

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Politics
6:19 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Vote Forces Senate To Talk About Gun Control

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Steve Inskeep is reporting for us this week from Caracas, Venezuela. I'm David Greene, in Washington, Where the Senate is now officially moving towards debate on gun control legislation. To get there, Democratic leaders had to defeat a Republican filibuster yesterday, and they did so with the help of 16 Republicans. The procedural vote was a victory for gun control supporters, but as NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, more battles lie ahead.

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Business
6:15 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Ex-KPMG Partner Accused Of Insider Trading

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Los Angeles, a former partner at KPMG, one of the big four accounting firms, has been charged with insider trading.

As NPR's Nina Gregory reports, Scott London is accused of trading tips for money and gifts.

NINA GREGORY, BYLINE: The details in the Justice Department's criminal complaint against Scott London read like bad fiction. Bags of hundred dollar bills wrapped in $10,000 bundles, a Rolex worth an estimated twelve-thousand dollars, secrets shared at the country club and covert recordings of phone calls.

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