National

Author Interviews
4:55 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Questlove's Roots: A 'Meta' Memoir Of A Lifetime In Music

In his new memoir, Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson describes his life in music — and how he mimicked beats at just 10 months old.
Danny Clinch Grand Central Publishing

About 25 years ago, Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson and Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter were students in a Philadelphia high school and they wanted to impress a girl. So they formed a band ... which would go on to become the Grammy Award-winning hip-hop band The Roots. Questlove, the drummer for The Roots, says that for him, a musical future was preordained. As he recounts in a new memoir, Mo' Meta Blues, his father, Lee Andrews — a member of the successful 1950s doo-wop group Lee Andrews and the Hearts — groomed Questlove for show business from an early age.

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Economy
3:57 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Op-Ed: Emerging Labor Movement Is A Presidential Opportunity

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now, time for the Opinion Page. There's a new kind of labor movement in the United States led by those who are not in unions, primarily retail and fast-food workers. These workers are protesting before they unionize. And in a column for the Chicago Tribune, columnist Clarence Page compares this new labor movement to Occupy Wall Street.

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Shots - Health News
3:16 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Could LeBron And RGIII Help Sell The Affordable Care Act?

Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III already promotes Subway sandwiches. Will health insurance be next?
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:26 pm

Who's going to be more successful at selling health insurance to young men this fall: NBA MVP LeBron James, NFL rookie of the year Robert Griffin III, or Mom? If officials at the Department of Health and Human Services get their way, all may be drafted.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Update: 'Rusty The Panda' Has Been Found, National Zoo Says

"Rusty the Panda" spent part of Monday on the loose in D.C. He was spotted by residents in a neighborhood next to the National Zoo's grounds.
National Zoo

Update At 2:27 p.m. ET. Panda Is Safe And Sound

"Rusty the red panda has been recovered, crated & is headed safely back to the National Zoo!"

That's the breathless update from the National Zoo, announcing Rusty's return to safe hands Monday afternoon. The zoo followed that tweet with a note of appreciation: "Thank you so much to everyone who helped us look for and find him!"

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Law
1:50 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Race And Admissions: The University Of Texas' Long History

Students walk through the University of Texas, Austin, campus near the school's iconic tower.
Eric Gay AP

The U.S. Supreme Court sent a case involving the use of race in the University of Texas' admissions process back to a lower court for stricter scrutiny on Monday. It's one more chapter in the university's long struggle with how it chooses who gets in.

Here's a brief look at some key moments:

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Music Interviews
1:40 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Macy Gray: 'I Still See My Voice As Odd'

Macy Gray says being an artist means not having any limits or constraints.
Courtesy of the artist

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Shots - Health News
12:54 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Doctors Say Wait Longer Before Treating Kids' Sinus Infections

Colds can easily turn into sinus infections in children.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:40 pm

Children often get sinus infections after they've had a cold.

It can be hard for parents and doctors to tell when those infections need treatment with antibiotics, and when they should be left to get better on their own.

The nation's pediatricians are trying to make that call a bit easier. In new guidelines released today, they say that it's OK to wait a while longer to see if a child gets better before treating a sinus infection with antibiotics. Now parents can wait and see what happens for 13 days instead of 10 days, the pediatricians recommend.

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Law
11:55 am
Mon June 24, 2013

What Does Supreme Court Ruling Mean For Affirmative Action?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. My thanks to my colleague Celeste Headlee for sitting in for a few days while I was away last week.

Later on today, we'll talk about that controversial decision by the American Medical Association to classify obesity as a disease. We'll speak with a group of healthcare professionals about what that could mean.

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Health Care
11:55 am
Mon June 24, 2013

The Unease Over Classifying Obesity As A Disease

More than 1 in 3 Americans are obese, and the problem isn't shrinking. The American Medical Association recently voted to classify obesity as a disease, but not everyone likes the decision. Host Michel Martin talks to a roundtable of medical experts about the pros and cons.

Monkey See
9:02 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Illusions Of Grandeur: Why Don Draper Will Never Get To California

Jon Hamm as Don Draper on Mad Men.
Jaimie Trueblood AMC

What makes Don Draper dashing is the suit, especially. And the hat, the jaw, the hair, the voice, the way he fixes his attention on a woman. But what makes Don Draper seductive as a person and not just a sexual partner is that he is perpetually a whisper away from being a better man. If he were just dashing, he would be harmless; it's that he's seductive that makes him dangerous. It's how close he seems to becoming better that makes him toxic.

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Politics
5:16 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Political Conservatives Stage App-Building Competition

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's no great secret that Republicans are behind in applying digital technology to politics. They admitted as much after the last presidential election. And in an effort to catch up, over the weekend, political conservatives staged an event called the Liberty Hackathon in San Francisco. The sponsor of the app building competition was the Charles Koch Institute, named for its benefactor the billionaire backer of the Tea Party Movement.

NPR's Nathan Rott went to the event and sent us this report.

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Shots - Health News
3:04 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Proposed Changes In Organ Donation Stir Debate

Hospitals and organ banks could get more leeway in decisions about donations.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

The nation's organ transplant network will consider a controversial proposal Monday to overhaul the guidelines for an increasingly common form of organ donation.

The board of directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing will open a two-day meeting at the organization's headquarters in Richmond, Va., to consider new guidelines for donation after cardiac death.

Donation after cardiac death involves removing organs minutes after life-support has been stopped for patients who still have at least some brain activity.

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Energy
3:03 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Can An Old Massachusetts Fishing Port Light The World Again?

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joined state officials, clean energy advocates and union representatives to break ground for the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:21 pm

A shabby old fishing port on the South Coast of Massachusetts was once known as the City That Lit the World. Its whale oil powered candles and lamps around the country.

Now, the city is trying to rekindle that flame with an alternative form of energy: offshore wind.

A Distant History Of Wealth

New Bedford's glory days are long gone. The city suffers from a long list of woes — high crime, persistent unemployment and poor public schools.

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Around the Nation
3:02 am
Mon June 24, 2013

In Chicago, Public Housing Experiment Enters New Phase

The last high rise at Chicago's Cabrini-Green public housing complex was demolished in 2011.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 12:25 pm

The Chicago Housing Authority has torn down all of its high rises and says it's close to completing its plans to transform public housing. Now, city leaders are moving to the next part of their plan: using public housing funds not just to build homes for poor families, but stores where they could shop and work. Some residents, however, say the city is breaking a promise to provide affordable housing.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Gloomy Thinking Can Be Contagious

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 10:59 am

When students show up at college in the fall, they'll have to deal with new classes, new friends and a new environment. In many cases, they will also have new roommates — and an intriguing new research study suggests this can have important mental health consequences.

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