National

Health
3:58 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Judge Rules Morning-After Pill Should Be Available To All Ages

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

A federal judge in New York has ordered the Food and Drug Administration to lift all age restrictions on the over-the-counter sale of the so-called Morning After Pill. The decision could herald the end of a more than decade-long battle spanning two administrations.

The Salt
3:50 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Craft Beer-Crazy Oregon Poised To Name Official State Microbe

Oh, Portland: the Hopworks Urban Brewery's "pub bike."
Elly Blue/via Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 4:36 pm

A humble creature that has long toiled in obscurity for the benefit of humankind is poised to win a small measure of the distinction it deserves: designation as Oregon's official state microbe.

It looks to be the first microbe to gain official state recognition.

The microbe in question, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, plays a key role in the state's economy. Without it, sugar would not become alcohol, and Oregon would not have a craft beer industry worth $2.4 billion.

That's a lot of yeast.

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Shots - Health News
3:01 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

As Palliative Care Need Grows, Specialists Are Scarce

Dr. Martha Twaddle talks to a patient and strokes her hair during a visit at the Midwest Palliative and Hospice CareCenter in Skokie, Ill., in 2012.
Antonia Perez MCT /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:59 pm

Baby boomers have never needed more care to ease their pain and suffering. But there simply aren't enough specialists to get the job done.

There's a shortfall of as many as 18,000 physicians focused on palliative care and hospice care. Right now, there are 5,150 hospice programs and 1,635 hospital palliative care teams in the U.S., according to the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

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Economy
2:43 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Honda's Growth Helps Tow Ohio Out Of Recession

Al Kinzer, who was Honda of America's first employee, drives the company's one millionth U.S.-produced car off the assembly line at Honda's assembly plant in Marysville, Ohio, April 8, 1988.
Greg Sailor AP

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

Honda is moving its North American headquarters from California to Ohio. That's just the latest bit of good news for the Buckeye State and Honda, whose fortunes have been closely tied for decades now.

Honda has been an economic heavyweight here since it was lured to central Ohio in the 1970s. The company's footprint is big, and it continues to increase.

Honda's sprawling Marysville Auto Plant opened outside Columbus in 1982. Since then, it has grown to nearly 4 million square feet and now sits on a campus of 8,000 acres.

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Shots - Health News
1:48 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Lead In Soil May Be An Overlooked Threat To Kids' Health

Industrial cities like Detroit have high levels of lead in the aging housing stock and in soils. Researchers found that the amount of soil lead in Detroit that gets suspended in the air correlated with the levels of lead in kids' blood.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:43 pm

Lead poisoning in kids is hardly the problem it used to be, now that we've stopped using lead in house paints and gasoline. But the lead that lingers outside and in old homes is still dangerous if kids are exposed to it.

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Monkey See
1:03 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Grown Ups 2'

Tracy Bennett Sony Pictures

This is an experiment with a minimalist approach to the Let's Rush To Judgment post.

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Barbershop
12:22 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Rutgers Coach Firing: Have We Gotten Too Soft?

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 10:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Tracking A Rise In ADHD Diagnosis

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Earlier this week, the New York Times reported new CDC data on diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD, in kids. And the numbers are startling, with 11 percent of the parents surveyed reporting a diagnosis of ADHD for their school-age kids, higher numbers for some sub-groups of age and gender. That's a big jump. Estimates before that had been that ADHD affected somewhere from three to seven percent of children.

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Monkey See
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: In The Long Run

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's extremely punchy round-table podcast, once we cover our most important landmark of the week, Stephen Thompson gets through some preposterous claims loosely connected to this video and we get on the topic of

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Building Synthetic Tissues from Water Droplets?

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

That flute can only mean that Flora Lichtman is here. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: Flora is our correspondent and managing editor for video. And we've got our Video Pick of the Week.

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

President Obama Calls For A 'BRAIN Initiative'

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 2:15 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Early this week, President Obama announced a new research initiative focused on the human brain. Here he is talking about it at the White House.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

'Drunk Tank Pink' Finds Clues To Behavior

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

If you're looking for a date on Match.com, does it matter what color your shirt is in your profile picture? Or if you're trying to make a partner, you want to make partner at a law firm, yeah, does having a hard-to-pronounce last name hurt your chances? Does staring at a pile of money, even phony Monopoly money, make you more selfish?

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Amyloid Proteins Help Paralyzed Mice Walk Again

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Reporting in Science Translational Medicine, researchers write that amyloid-forming proteins, traditionally thought of as enemies to the nervous system, may actually be protective 'guardians' instead. Study author Lawrence Steinman, a neurologist at Stanford University, explains how amyloid injections helped paralyzed mice with a multiple-sclerosis-like disease walk again.

The Salt
11:04 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Freezing Food Doesn't Kill E. Coli And Other Germs

The NPR Science Desk freezer: now we know we can't presume it's germ-free.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Think that freezing food kills E. coli and other nasty microbes? Think again.

That's the lesson from the new E. coli outbreak caused by frozen chicken quesadillas and other snacks that has sickened 24 people in 15 states.

Freezing does slow down the microbes that cause food to spoil, but it's pretty much useless for killing dangerous bugs.

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Around the Nation
7:30 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Fan Refuses To Shave Until A D.C. Team Wins A Championship

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene, with a story of a harried sports fan - or, rather, a hairy sports fan. Thomas McAllister believes in his Washington, D.C. team so much that he's vowing not to shave until one of them - the Redskins, Wizards, Capitals or Nationals - wins a championship. The Washington Post says he hasn't shaved since last June, a day before he got married. Facebook followers have given his red fan beard a name: Lombeardi.

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