National

The Two-Way
1:40 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'Victory' For Landowners At The Supreme Court

Gary Cameron Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 3:12 pm

While the Supreme Court decision knocking down a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is getting a lot of attention Tuesday, there's another ruling that's going to be of high interest to property owners across the nation.

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Shots - Health News
1:20 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Big Weight Loss For Diabetics, But No Drop In Heart Risk

Weight loss has been a key component of diabetes treatment for centuries.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:23 pm

Hundreds of overweight or obese people with diabetes have been able to do something very few Americans have done: lose a big chunk of weight and keep it off for 10 years.

So should it matter if that epic weight loss didn't reduce the risk of heart disease? Maybe not.

That's one response to the results of the Look AHEAD clinical trial, which checked to see if losing weight reduced heart disease risk in people with Type 2 diabetes.

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Politics
11:57 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Immigration Bill 'Disadvantages Women?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we are going to take a look at a sensitive topic. We are going to talk about infidelity. Sure, we talk about it when a politician or a celebrity gets caught, but what about friends, neighbors, ourselves? Hundreds of listeners have been sending in their stories. We'll hear some of them and new research about this topic. That's later in the program.

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Law
11:57 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Voting Rights Act: Supreme Court Says Times Have Changed

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we will hear a perspective on the immigration bill, which is being debated in the Senate right now. You might not have heard this point of view. We'll hear from Senator Mazie Hirono from Hawaii. She tells us why she thinks the bill in its current form disadvantages women. And she'll tell us what she proposes to do about that. That's coming up later in the program.

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The Salt
11:26 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Will GMOs Help Protect Ugandan Families Against Hunger?

A woman sells bananas at the Kampala Airport. Ugandans eat about a pound of the fruit, on average, per day.
Ronald Kabuubi AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 1:45 pm

While a few states in the U.S. are debating mandatory labels for genetically modified foods, some African nations are considering a bigger question: Should farmers be allowed to plant genetically modified crops at all?

The question carries extra weight in countries like Uganda, where most people are farmers who depend on their own crops for food.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Tue June 25, 2013

LIVE BLOG: Supreme Court's Latest Rulings

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:59 am

Update at 10:30 a.m. ET. Today's Major Ruling; Key Part Of 1965 Voting Rights Act Is Ruled Unconstitutional:

"By a 5-to-4 decision, the Supreme Court has struck down a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that establishes a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by Justice Department," Eyder writes.

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Shots - Health News
9:17 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Why Morning-After Pill Won't Stop All Unintended Pregnancies

Almost half of all pregnancies in the U.S. are unintended.
Rudyanto Wijaya iStockphoto.com

Women of all ages will soon be able to buy emergency contraceptives over the counter without a prescription, now that the Obama administration has decided to stop fighting a judge's order to make the drugs more easily available.

But better access to emergency contraception doesn't necessarily reduce rates of unintended pregnancy, research has found. Why that's so remains unclear, although researchers have some ideas.

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Monkey See
8:52 am
Tue June 25, 2013

The Seven Ways To Write About Television

iStockphoto.com

Perhaps it's the combination of Sunday night's Mad Men finale and the flurry of Sopranos discussion that followed the death of James Gandolfini, but it's hard not to be struck by the explosion of writing about television that's occurred in the last 15 years or so, facilitated (of course) by the ability to go from rolling credits to publication in an hour (if necessary). After any major episode, there will be a flurry of commentary, and even after minor episodes of minor shows, there are write-ups here and there.

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Around the Nation
6:41 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Daughter Bills Dad For IT Support Chores

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. If you're on the younger side, do you ever feel like your parents treat you like their own personal IT support? Well, one woman decided to send her dad an invoice. She posted it online. It comes from a company called Your Awesome Daughter.

Around the Nation
6:23 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Miami Heat Celebrate NBA Championship With Victory Parade

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

The Miami Heat, yesterday, held a victory parade that got people wondering was it planned by a Spurs' fan. The NBA champs piled onto the top of a double-decker bus that carried them through Miami streets overflowing with fans. But the route also passed under three low hanging overpasses. Amid shouts of, Get down, the six foot eight LeBron James barely managed to avoid what the Kansas City Star called a face full of concrete.

Business
5:19 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Idaho Leads Nation In Number Of Low-Wage Workers

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Seventy-five years ago today, President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act. That law established the federal minimum wage. So we're going to spend some time this morning in the state that has the highest proportion of workers who are paid this lowest legal hourly wage, which is now $7.25 an hour.

From Boise State Public Radio, Emilie Ritter Saunders reports on why Idaho is seeing low-wage work increase.

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Business
5:17 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Regulators Approve Deal Between Delta, Virgin Atlantic

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

News now, of another airline agreement, that's been approved by regulators. This latest deal sees Delta Airlines and Britain's Virgin Atlantic partnering on flights and marketing.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Animals
5:15 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Sea Lamprey Nosed Into Controlled Areas By Scent

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Researchers in the Great Lakes are trying to control an ancient fish, the sea lamprey. The species is notorious for latching onto other fish and literally sucking the life out of them. The lamprey larvae can be killed with a special poison, and now one biologist thinks he's found a way to make sure they're in the right place at the right time to die.

From member station WCMU, Amy Robinson reports.

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Law
5:08 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Justices Rule In Favor Of Employers In Discrimination Cases

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the Supreme Court was actually already having a busy week. Yesterday it handed down rulings in two other notable cases, both dealing with worker's rights. The justices split five to four along ideological lines to make it harder for employees to win discrimination lawsuits. The court raised new hurdles for plaintiffs who say they were victims of bias and then faced retaliation for raising the issue. NPR's Carrie Johnson has more.

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Law
5:07 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Supreme Court Sends Affirmative Action Case To Lower Court

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The U.S. Supreme Court surprised just about everyone yesterday with its decision on affirmative action in higher education. That surprise was an apparent compromise that leaves affirmative action programs intact for now but subjects them to a more rigorous review by the courts.

The vote was seven to one, as NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports.

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