National

Monkey See
5:18 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Teens Find The Right Tools For Their Social-Media Jobs

When you need to illustrate a story about proliferating social-media platforms, it's good to know that an enterprising stock photographer has probably thought about it already.
Anatoliy Babiy iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Once upon a time, it was MySpace. (Huh. Turns out you can still link to it.) Then Facebook happened. And Twitter. And beyond those two dominant social-media platforms, there are a host of other, newer options for staying in touch and letting the digital universe get a look at your life. And for certain kinds of sharing, some of those other options make more sense to tech-savvy teens than the Big Two do.

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Shots - Health News
4:40 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

After Long Search, Komen Foundation Replaces Brinker As CEO

Nancy Brinker, founder of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, seen at a dinner honoring the recipients of the 2012 Kennedy Center Honors in December.
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 9:45 am

The Komen Foundation for the Cure has a new chief executive.

Dr. Judith Salerno, 61, a geriatrician, is replacing Nancy Brinker, the philanthropy's founder and longtime CEO, the group said Monday.

"Judy's years of proven leadership in public policy and research make her the right choice to lead all aspects of Komen's mission," said Linda Custard, chair of the Komen board, in a statement.

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Energy
4:36 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Calif. Wonders About Energy Future After Nuclear Plant Closes

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Southern California, the power grid is always a hot topic. It's a part of the country that is all too familiar with the rolling blackouts. And now there is more reason for concern about the region's capacity to generate electricity. The San Onofre nuclear power plant is shutting down for good, thanks to worn-out parts. It's been off-line for more than a year after a pipe was found leaking radioactive steam. At its peak, San Onofre provided power for 1.4 million homes.

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Around the Nation
4:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Some Colorado Wildfire Evacuees Briefly Allowed Back Into Homes

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

The Black Forest Fire near Colorado Springs, Colo., has pushed about 4,500 evacuees out of their homes. Police are escorting some of them back in to pick up critical medications or rescue pets.

Around the Nation
4:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Collection Of Kids' Shoes Carries Message About Gun Violence

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You are listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

A mother in New Jersey has set out to collect shoes, 3,792 pairs of shoes, one for each young person killed by gun violence in the U.S. in 1998. That was the year that her son was shot and killed as we hear from Sarah Gonzalez of New Jersey Public Radio.

SARAH GONZALEZ, BYLINE: Elaine Lane came up with the idea of collecting shoes after walking a path of military boots that represented lives lost in the Iraq War. She couldn't finish the trail, but it gave her an idea.

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The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

FTC Can Sue Firms In 'Pay For Delay' Drug Deals, Court Rules

The Supreme Court has ruled that the FTC can challenge arrangements between makers of generic drugs and makers of brand-name products such as AndroGel, seen here on a computer monitor screen.
Reed Saxon AP

When the maker of a brand-name drug pays a maker of generic drugs to not produce a lower-priced version of their product, the Federal Trade Commission can challenge the arrangement on antitrust grounds, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The ruling may end the era of what regulators call "pay-for-delay" deals.

The justices voted 5-3 to allow a case to go forward in which the FTC is challenging one of many such deals. Several companies are involved in the case, including Solvay Pharmaceuticals, maker of AndroGel, and generic-drug maker Actavis.

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Shots - Health News
2:31 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

When Sibling Fights Go Beyond Harmless Kid Stuff

Beheading Barbie is the kind of aggression that can cause sibling distress.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 9:45 am

I'll never forget the time my big brother sank his fork in the back of my hand after I snitched food off his plate.

But all siblings fight, right? So I was more than a little skeptical of a study saying that sibling aggression can cause serious mental health problems like depression and anxiety.

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Around the Nation
2:16 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Reflections On 30 Years Of NYC: A Look Ahead With Margot Adler

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 4:06 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. For the past several weeks, we've taken the opportunity to reconnect with some of our favorite guests and colleagues in a series of conversations looking ahead. Today, longtime NPR New York correspondent Margot Adler, who's filed stories on hundreds of New Yorkers over the years: AIDS activists, street musicians, cops, environmental visionaries, and a guy who will move your car at exactly the right moment to take full advantage of opposite-side-of-the-street parking laws.

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Law
1:54 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

After SCOTUS DNA Ruling, What Changes For Police?

The Supreme Court ruled in June that police can routinely take DNA samples from people who are arrested for comparison against a national database. The decision raises major questions about how law enforcement and criminal justice processes will change.

Movies
11:44 am
Mon June 17, 2013

African-Americans And Gay Marriage: It's Complicated

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Among the many explosive issues the Supreme Court is expected to take on this year is the issue of same-sex marriage: whether same-sex couples should have the same benefits as straight ones. But one of the most sensitive aspects of that issue is the element of race. Documentary filmmaker Yoruba Richen takes on both of those issues in a new documentary called "The New Black."

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY "THE NEW BLACK")

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Politics
11:44 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Why Do We Keep Forgetting About Gun Control?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. You've probably heard that the Supreme Court is set to rule sometime soon on an important case about affirmative action in higher education. We decided we wanted to find out more about the young woman whose name is on the case, Abigail Fisher. That's coming up later in the program.

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Law
11:44 am
Mon June 17, 2013

SCOTUS And Affirmative Action: Who Is Abigail Fisher?

The Supreme Court is weighing a decision on Abigail Fisher's affirmative action case against the University of Texas. Host Michel Martin speaks with ProPublica writer Nikole Hannah-Jones about Fisher's motivation and what's behind the landmark case.

Education
11:44 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Dear Harvard, My Career Deserved More Respect

In 1961, Phyllis Richman started applying to graduate school at Harvard. But she was discouraged when a professor asked how she would balance her professional life with 'responsibilities' to her husband. Host Michel Martin speaks with Richman about a response letter she wrote 52 years later.

Monkey See
11:36 am
Mon June 17, 2013

In Slight Defense Of Miss Utah USA, A Little Bit, With Reservations

Television personality and host Giuliana Rancic looks on as Miss Utah USA Marissa Powell answers a question from a judge during the interview portion of the 2013 Miss USA pageant on Sunday night.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Look, Miss Utah USA, Marissa Powell, gave a pretty unimpressive answer to a question about income inequality at the Miss USA pageant. Let's all agree on that.

But what, exactly, did the circumstances call for?

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Monkey See
8:59 am
Mon June 17, 2013

The NFL To Your Purse: Drop Dead

Nichols iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 11:45 am

Last Thursday, the NFL announced a policy change in which only clear plastic bags would be allowed into stadiums — one per person. Nothing they can't see through. The league says that the change is meant to ensure safety while speeding up security checks and preventing gate backups, which sounds good enough at the outset.

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