National

Around the Nation
12:00 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Maybe We Should Retire The Word 'Retire'

The official portrait of retirement has changed, and it didn't change to this.
iStockphoto.com

Retirement ads are everywhere these days. The Villages lures retirees to come live, love and golf in Florida. USAA offers financial counsel to retiring military personnel.

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History
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

The People Behind Guthrie's 'Deportee' Verses

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 2:00 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We want to turn, now, to a current effort to address a decades-old tragedy. In 1948, a U.S. Immigration Service plane carrying undocumented immigrants from California to Mexico, crashed. All 32 people onboard were killed. But while news accounts listed the names of the four people in the flight crew, the 28 undocumented victims were just listed as Mexican deportees.

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Religion
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Bishop: 'I See Marriage As A Sacred Institution'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, if you follow sports you might have sympathy - or not - for heartbroken March Madness fans whose schools have already flunked out. We're going to ask why we care so much when our brackets are broken. That conversation is in just a few minutes. But first we want to return to two important cases being argued in the Supreme Court this week.

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Sports
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Busted Brackets: Therapy For Sports Fanatics

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 1:52 pm

Die-hard fans of Georgetown, Gonzaga and other colleges are feeling down in the dumps after their favored teams lost early in the NCAA basketball tournament. But when do the March Madness blues go too far? Host Michel Martin discusses the psychology of sports fanaticism with professor Don Forsyth of the University of Richmond.

Can I Just Tell You?
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Martin Recalls The Supreme Court 34 Years Ago

Jose Luis Magana ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 4:09 pm

Finally, the pictures of people camping out in the cold outside the Supreme Court, so they could get in to hear the oral arguments on marriage equality, brought back memories for me.

You might not believe this, but on this very day in 1979 my buddy Dave and I walked into the court after having done the same thing — although I confess we weren't as smart about it as the people were this week. We had nothing — no tent, no tarp — just our notebooks and some hot tea we bought at the train station.

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Shots - Health News
10:11 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Why More Patients Should Blog About Illness And Death

David Oliver sits quietly as he waits for the results of a scan at Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., in 2012. The University of Missouri research professor was diagnosed with cancer in September 2011. He broke the news to colleagues via a video on the Internet.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:51 pm

I entered the world of illness blogs for the first time when I learned through Facebook that a friend from middle school passed away last Friday from acute myeloid leukemia. In the three months between his diagnosis and his death, the friend, whom I'll call Tom, blogged beautifully and intimately on CaringBridge, a Web tool designed to help the seriously ill tell their stories and manage communication with friends and family.

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Monkey See
8:37 am
Thu March 28, 2013

The Good News Is That We Know 'Idol' Is Really Live Now

Michael Becker Fox

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:56 am

Last night on American Idol was Motown Night, when we all learned that Motown songs (like "I Heard It Through The Grapevine") should all be sung as seriously as possible, wearing a scowl, with all the fun sucked out. (And that was a performance that was pretty good.) It's in keeping with this season, in which melodramatic ballads have dominated even more than usual.

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Around the Nation
7:19 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Office Lottery Winners Share With Non-Player

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

At a Florida real estate agency, employees pooled their cash to buy Powerball tickets and they won a million bucks. Everyone had chipped in except Jennifer Maldonado. She had just started working there and said she was watching her pennies. But all 12 winners each still gave Jennifer part of their $83,000 share.

Hang on a second - I got to call my colleagues outside the studio. Hey, guys. Guys, would you share your lottery winnings if I didn't pay in?

This is MORNING EDITION.

Business
7:16 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Cheap Natural Gas Pumping New Life Into U.S. Factories

A worker hooks up pipe during natural gas drilling by EnerVest on the Barnett Shale near Fort Worth, Texas, in 2012.
Ron Jenkins MCT /Landov

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 5:13 pm

The millions of Americans who lost factory jobs over the past decade may find this hard to believe, but U.S. manufacturing is coming back to life.

The chest compressions are applied by the pumping of cheap, domestic natural gas.

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Law
6:15 am
Thu March 28, 2013

5 Justices Express Doubt About Defense Of Marriage Act

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Buried In Grain
5:51 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Why Grain Storage Bin Rescues Are Risky And Complex

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In the last three weeks, emergency responders in three states were called to grain storage bins to rescue trapped workers. Two victims were partially buried in grain but survived, two others were overcome by toxic gases and died. We've been reporting this week about hundreds of deaths in grain bins. Grain bin rescues are risky and complex, as NPR's Howard Berkes reports.

HOWARD BERKES, BYLINE: The rescues usually start with emergency radio calls like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF ALARM)

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Business
5:51 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Researchers Expect Oil Demand To Plateau By Decade's End

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an appetite for oil.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: Researchers say they see a plateau in the demand for oil. A new report says demand could level off by the end of this decade, and that's a lot sooner than expected, as NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

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Business
5:51 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Manufacturing Redux Benefits Texas Gulf Coast

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's stay on the topic of energy. Millions of Americans have lost factory jobs over the past decade, but U.S. manufacturing is coming back to life, in large measure because of abundant supplies or cheap natural gas. From member station KUHF in Houston, Andrew Schneider reports on how the Texas Gulf Coast is booming as companies build new plants.

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Politics
5:51 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Senators Get First-Hand Look At Border Security

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. There is new momentum for a major overhaul of the nation's immigration laws. As usual, it's just a matter of closing the deal. Among those trying to hash out a compromise is the so-called Gang of Eight, a bipartisan group of U.S. senators. Yesterday, four of them took time out of their congressional recess to visit Arizona for a firsthand look at border security.

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Around the Nation
5:51 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Supreme Court Upholds Indiana's School vouchers

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now a note about something else that is sticking in Indiana: This week, that state's Supreme Court upheld Indiana's school voucher law.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The case was widely watched, because the program there has wide eligibility. Most states using school vouchers limit them to low-income families, or to families with kids in failing schools.

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