National

The Salt
5:12 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Tender Beef, Without The Pathogens: USDA Proposes Labeling Rules

Meat tenderized the old-fashioned way. The industrial method is a mechanized process involving needles.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:27 pm

In order to make tough cuts of beef more tender, the industry uses a mechanical tenderizing process that involves piercing the meat with needles.

This is effective in breaking up the tough muscle fibers, but there's a downside, too: a higher risk of surface bacteria making their way into the cut of meat, which can set the stage for food poisoning. That's a particular concern when it comes to the center of meat cuts, which don't get heated to the same temperatures as the exterior.

Read more
NPR Story
4:42 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Weeks Later, IRS Investigation Hasn't Slowed Down

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

An update now on the congressional investigation into the IRS' flagging of conservative groups for extra scrutiny. For the first time since the scandal broke, there are no public hearings scheduled this week. The action is all behind closed doors as NPR's Tamara Keith tells us from Capitol Hill.

Read more
The Salt
4:35 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

The Latest In Adventurous Tastings? Prison Food

Sean Kelley, senior vice president at the Eastern State Penitentiary, displays a plate of "food loaf," a punishment food currently served in Pennsylvania prisons. Over the weekend, the historic penitentiary, now a museum, served visitors sample meals from the 1800s, 1900s and today.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:11 am

Our fascination with prison food is usually limited to death row prisoners' elaborate last meal requests and urban legends about disturbingly low-grade meat. But nowadays, the walls between the prison cafeteria and the outside world are coming down, at least metaphorically.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:48 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea Rises In Great Britain

A public health poster from 1952 encourages Americans to get checked for sexually transmitted diseases. Gonorrhea is the second-most-common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 300,000 cases reported in 2011.
Images from the History of Medicine

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 12:31 pm

Forms of gonorrhea that don't respond to the last line of antibiotics have rapidly spread in Great Britain, expanding the reach of drug-resistant disease.

The number of gonorrhea cases with decreased sensitivity to the front-line drug cefixime increased by nearly six times from 2004 to 2011 in England and Wales, a team from the U.K.'s Health Protection Agency reported Tuesday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Read more
Law
2:26 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Pushed Off The Job While Pregnant

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:20 pm

At a time when most pregnant women work, there are new efforts to keep companies from unfairly targeting employees because of a pregnancy. The allegations of pregnancy discrimination persist and have even risen in recent years despite a decades-old law against it, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Read more
Law
2:20 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Justice And Jury Selection: Judging Jurors Before A Trial

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Lynn Neary in Washington; Neal Conan is away. For the second day in a row, lawyers questioned potential jurors in the George Zimmerman trial. Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, last year.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

He Broke The NSA Leaks Story, But Just Who Is Glenn Greenwald?

Glenn Greenwald, columnist/blogger/lawyer/advocate.
Kin Cheung AP

He's an advocate, an activist, a lawyer, a blogger, a columnist, an author and an award-winning investigative journalist.

Now, Glenn Greenwald is at the center of the stories about surveillance and data-collection programs being run by the National Security Agency.

Read more
The Salt
12:40 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Za'atar: A Spice Mix With Biblical Roots And Brain Food Reputation

Lebanese bread topped with za'atar, a spice mix ubiquitous in the Middle East.
Photostock Israel Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 11:27 am

NPR Morning Edition Host Steve Inskeep recently traveled to Damascus for a series of reports on the ongoing war in Syria. He sent this postcard from the road.

Dear Salt:

On my first day in Damascus, I went walking in the ancient bazaar — narrow stone-paved streets surrounding a great stone mosque. The mosque is so old, it used to be a church during the Roman Empire, and before it was a church, it was a pagan temple. The bazaar is surely as old as the mosque, for Damascus is a historic city of trade.

Read more
Money Coach
12:04 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Interest Rates Up: Could Spell Uncertainty For Home Loans, Retirement

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Parenting
12:00 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Father Knows Best: Advice For Modern Dads

Looking ahead to Father's Day this weekend, Tell Me More's parenting panel dishes some advice. Host Michel Martin is joined by some pros — Dan Bucatinsky, Lester Spence and Manny Ruiz — who answer listener questions about how best to parent in today's busy world.

Education
11:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Graduation Rates Hit New High: Good News For Everyone?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
National Security
11:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Can Privacy And Security Go Hand In Hand?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:47 am
Tue June 11, 2013

How CT Scans Have Raised Kids' Risk For Future Cancer

Use of CT scans has doubled for children under five and tripled for older children.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:40 am

Doctors are prescribing too many CT scans for children, a study says, even though they know that the radiation used in the tests increases children's lifelong risk of cancer.

Choosing other tests and dialing back the radiation used in the scans would prevent 62 percent of related cancers, according to Diana Miglioretti, a biostatistician at the University of California, Davis, who led the study.

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:40 am
Tue June 11, 2013

A Delay In Relief From Copays For Costly Drugs

Expensive prescriptions drugs can stretch people's finances, even if they have insurance.
iStockphoto.com

For people with a chronic or serious illness, drugs that can help slow or cure the disease often put a financial strain on even the best insurance coverage.

Read more
Monkey See
9:04 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Theater Of The Absurd: Have Audiences Lost Their Manners?

Scott Griessel - Creatista iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:58 am

If you woke up this morning thinking, "I really need to hear NPR's Linda Wertheimer say the words 'noisily unwrapping her Twizzlers,'" have I got good news for you.

Read more

Pages