National

NPR Story
5:19 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Iowa Rebrands Medicaid Coverage

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Republican governor of Iowa is one of the longest serving in U.S. history. And with a election campaign coming up next year, he's suddenly taken a keen interest in making one controversial part of Obamacare work. That's the expansion of Medicaid, something some states are still deciding whether or not to do. Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters has more.

Read more
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:13 am

As we head into the summer months, NPR is looking back to the summer of 1963, a momentous year in civil rights history. As part of NPR's partnership with The Race Card Project, which asks people to distill their thoughts on race to six words, Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris is asking people who were on the front lines of history to share their memories and their thoughts on race in America today.

Read more
Politics
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

How The Senate Farm Bill Would Change Subsidies

Third-generation Oklahoma farmer Scott Neufeld says crop insurance is important to his family's business.
Tamara Keith NPR

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:40 pm

The Senate voted Monday to approve its version of the farm bill, a massive spending measure that covers everything from food stamps to crop insurance and sets the nation's farm policy for the next five years.

The centerpiece of that policy is an expanded crop insurance program, designed to protect farmers from losses, that some say amounts to a highly subsidized gift to agribusiness. That debate is set to continue as the House plans to take up its version of the bill this month.

Read more
The Salt
6:01 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Hey, Fellas, Olive Oil And Nuts Tied to Prostate Cancer Survival

Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:45 pm

Sometimes, it doesn't take a major diet overhaul to get significant health benefits. Small changes can be helpful, too.

This seems to be the take-home message from a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine linking olive oil and nuts to improved survival from prostate cancer.

Researchers studied the fat intake of more than 4,500 men who had been diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer (this is cancer that's still confined to the prostate gland and has not spread to another place in the body).

Read more
Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Cooper Union Students Fight For Freedom From Tuition

An image of Cooper Union founder Peter Cooper is projected on the office of school President Jamshed Bharucha, in protest of the institution's decision to begin charging tuition.
Courtesy of The Illuminator

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

When students at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York took over the president's office one month ago to protest the school's decision to charge tuition, they painted the lobby black.

They also took a painting of the school's founder, and hung a piece of red fabric from the frame, as if Peter Cooper himself had joined in the protest.

Read more
Law
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Jury Selection Begins In George Zimmerman Trial

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Jury selection began today in the trial of George Zimmerman. He's the Neighborhood Watch volunteer who shot and killed an unarmed teenager named Trayvon Martin last year in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman tailed Martin through a row of townhouses on a rainy night, first in a truck, then on foot. Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to a second-degree murder charge. He describes himself as Hispanic. Martin was African-American. And the racially-charged trial now centers on whether Zimmerman acted in self-defense.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Outreach Meeting In Tenn. Clouded By Anti-Muslim Uproar

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 10:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Some communities in central Tennessee have been experiencing tension between Christians and Muslims. Those tensions erupted last week at a gathering intended to address discrimination against Muslims. It turned into a heated shouting match. The event was organized by the local U.S. attorney. He intended it as a discussion. Instead, he endured jeering from the crowd. Blake Farmer of member station WPLN tells us more.

Read more
Television
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Summer No Longer A Time Of Drought For Television

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Summer's almost here. And that must mean it's time for - Audie.

CORNISH: More TV. New summer programming, right, Eric Deggans?

ERIC DEGGANS: That's right.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Triple Threat: Middle East Respiratory Virus And 2 Bird Flus

Men outside a hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, wear surgical masks as a precaution against infection with a coronavirus.
Stringer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

The World Health Organization is warning health care workers everywhere to suspect a disease called Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, whenever they see a case of unexplained pneumonia.

Monday's warning comes at the end of a six-day WHO investigation in Saudi Arabia, where 40 of the 55 cases of the respiratory disease have occurred. Sixty percent of those people with known infections died.

Read more
Health Care
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Health Care Exchanges May Not Provide Many Options

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

It's not exactly a buyer's market for people who purchase their own health insurance. Prices can be high and options severely limited. A key piece of the Affordable Care Act is supposed to change that. New health exchanges will allow people to comparison shop for insurance, maybe even get a subsidy to help pay for it.

But as New Hampshire Public Radio's Todd Bookman reports, some people may still be left with few choices.

Read more
Monkey See
4:57 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Shoes, Romance, And Art: A Reader Walks With The Books She Loves

Rudi's shoes.
@rudi_bee

Longtime readers know that one of my favorite pop-culture blogs ever invented is Smart Bitches Trashy Books, which offers a home for romance readers (who are legion) to both love their books and laugh at their books.

Read more
The Picture Show
3:56 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

'Capturing Love': How To Photograph Same-Sex Weddings

A couple taking in the moment at the San Tan Valley Desert in Arizona.
Tammy Watson

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Summer means wedding season, and for many couples, photographing the groom lifting the bride, or the bride looking off wistfully into the distance is an essential. But what if the happy couple is a bride and a bride, or a groom and a groom?

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:11 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Concussion Prescription: A Year On The Bench For Youngsters?

Katherine Cuntz and Sarah Gaudet go up to head the ball during a Louisiana high school championship game in 2011.
Gerald Herbert AP

The moms at Saturday's soccer game let out a collective wow as a 10-year-old girl headed the ball away from the net.

Then one next to me said, "Should they be doing that?" Another said, "I don't think so." But none of us yelled: "Hey, kids, no heading the ball!"

Head injuries are a big problem for young athletes, who may be more vulnerable for a year after having a concussion, according to research published Monday. That means students and their parents may have to think hard about when it's safe to return to play.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:24 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Flying High And Low In 'Full Upright And Locked Position'

In Full Upright and Locked Position aviation consultant Mark Gerchick looks at post-Sept. 11 air travel.
W.W. Norton & Co.

No, you aren't imagining it: There is indeed less leg room on some airplanes than there used to be.

"Back in the old days, probably 20 years ago, the tendency was to have about 34 inches," says Mark Gerchick, a former chief counsel for the Federal Aviation Administration. "Now the standard is about 31 inches in the United States. ... Some of the low-cost airlines have tightened that up to about 28 inches, which is now approaching the limits of anatomical possibility."

Read more
Medical Treatments
2:05 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

The Promise In Unraveling The Mysteries Of Rare Diseases

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:13 pm

As a child, Jeannie Peeper was diagnosed with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, an extremely rare disease that causes a second skeleton to grow inside the body. Peeper and science writer Carl Zimmer discuss the efforts of a small group to fund research to battle the disease.

Pages