National

Around the Nation
3:20 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Sequestered Spring Means Fewer Rangers, Services At National Parks

Hikers walk on the Mist Trail to Vernal Fall at Yosemite National Park in California. The National Park Service has to cut $134 million from sites around the country, including Yosemite, due to the lack of a budget deal in Congress.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 11:49 am

Spring has come early to the Yosemite Valley, and the melting snow makes for a spectacular rush of water off the granite face of Yosemite Falls, the tallest in North America.

Early March is when park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they're figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget. Without a budget deal, the sequestration has forced the Park Service to cut a total of $134 million from sites around the country.

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The Salt
3:11 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Who Grew Your Pint? How Craft Brews Boost Local Farmers

Throwback Brewery in New Hampshire is one of almost 20 New England breweries using malts from Massachusetts' micro-malt house Vally Malt.
Courtesy of Throwback Brewery

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 5:27 pm

Brent Manning is a maltster on a mission. The co-founder of Riverbend Malt House in Asheville, N.C., wants people to be able to taste local grains in North Carolina's beers, just as vino aficionados can identify the provenance of fine wines.

"In the wine industry ... they will tell you that the No. 1 Syrah grape grows on this hillside over here because it's a bit rockier," Manning explains. "It's that very same connection to the soil and the underlying geology that creates these nuances in flavors."

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Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Infections With 'Nightmare Bacteria' Are On The Rise In U.S. Hospitals

Klebsiella pneumoniae, seen here with an electron microscope, are the most common superbugs causing highly drug-resistant infections in hospitals.
Kwangshin Kim Science Source

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:34 pm

Federal officials warned Tuesday that an especially dangerous group of superbugs has become a significant health problem in hospitals throughout the United States.

These germs, known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, have become much more common in the last decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the risk they pose to health is becoming evident.

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Governing
1:44 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Old Triumph Over Young In Federal Spending, And Sequester Makes It Worse

Federal spending on seniors already far outpaces that devoted to children. Last year, overall spending on children dropped for the first time in 30 years. The sequester, which expressly protects programs for the elderly, will exacerbate that difference.
Anne de Haas iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:23 pm

For years, federal programs for seniors and those that help kids have been on a collision course.

Now, given the automatic spending cuts taking place under sequestration, the moment for real competition may have arrived.

While Medicare and Social Security will come through the sequester mostly unscathed, a broad swath of programs targeted toward children — Head Start, education, nutrition assistance, child welfare — stand to lose hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars.

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Sports
1:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

A Shifting Tide For Gay Athletes In Professional Sports?

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:45 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro, in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Last week, two pro football players asked the Supreme Court to support same-sex marriage. It was an unusual moment for the NFL. Not long ago, nobody in pro sports talked publicly about sexual orientation, and now the issue seems to be everywhere.

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Around the Nation
1:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Drones Come Home, Privacy Concerns Fly High

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:45 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, filling in for Neal Conan. It's a bird! It's a plane! Nope, it's an unmanned aircraft, also called a drone. Some can be as small as a microwave. Others can recognize a tennis shoe from 60,000 feet above the ground. And now, law enforcement agencies across the country are getting approval from the federal government to use these mechanical eyeballs here in the U.S.

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Health
1:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

What A Mississippi Baby Can Tell HIV Researchers

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now this week, doctors announced a breakthrough in HIV research. A Mississippi toddler who was born with the virus appears to have been cured. Doctors credit an aggressive regimen of anti-retroviral drugs administered just after the girl was born. This is the second well-documented case of someone being cured. The other involved a middle-aged San Francisco man who received a bone marrow transplant from a donor who was genetically resistant to HIV.

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The Salt
1:16 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Give Me Liberty, And Give Me Government-Subsidized Broccoli

Most people polled in a new survey said government programs to make fresh fruits and vegetables more affordable sound like a great idea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 12:32 pm

Americans are all for government efforts to get them to eat more healthfully, as long as they don't feel like they're being bullied into it. That's what people said in a new survey about government efforts to influence how we eat, like New York City's ban on supersized sodas.

In the past decade, state and federal governments have launched dozens of new laws and programs to promote healthful eating and exercise. They've put a lot of effort into measuring what works, but surprisingly little effort into finding out what the people at the receiving end think.

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Cyclists Do Not Emit More Carbon Than Cars, State Legislator Admits

Ed Orcutt has apologized for saying "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider," after an email with a bike shop owner sparked criticism. Here, a cyclist rides in Seattle last year." href="/post/cyclists-do-no-emit-more-carbon-cars-state-legislator-admits" class="noexit lightbox">
Washington State Rep. Ed Orcutt has apologized for saying "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider," after an email with a bike shop owner sparked criticism. Here, a cyclist rides in Seattle last year.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 1:19 pm

Days after angering cyclists with his contention that people who ride bikes don't help pay for roads — and stating that "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider," Washington State Rep. Ed Orcutt has apologized for his words, and any confusion they created.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

U.S. Speedskating Investigating Sexual Abuse Allegations

Speedskater Bridie Farrell competing last Friday in Kearns, Utah. Now 31, she says she was 15 when a much older teammate began sexually abusing her.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:17 pm

Yet another scandal has hit U.S. Speedskating (USS), which governs the sport with the biggest haul of winter Olympic medals for Team USA.

The USS board announced Monday night that it is investigating allegations of sexual abuse involving short track silver medalist Andy Gabel, now 48, who also once served as president of USS.

"U.S. Speedskating will not tolerate abuse of any kind and we intend to investigate these claims, and any others that arise, thoroughly," the group said in a written statement.

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Economy
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Not Having Kids Bad For The Economy?

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the part of the program where we usually check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and parenting advice. Today, though, we decided on a very different conversation about choosing not to be a parent.

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Your Money
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

'Tax Girl' Answers Your Questions

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:03 pm

Tax season is here and like a Facebook relationship, 'it's complicated.' That's according to Kelly Phillips Erb, the self-proclaimed 'tax girl.' She joins host Michel Martin to answer common tax conundrums.

Your Money
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Financial Advisors Selling Bogus Advice?

Skipping $4 lattes will save you some money — but buying into bogus financial advice won't. Finance journalist, Helaine Olen says many of the so-called 'financial experts' are selling you advice to make themselves rich. She discusses her book, Pound Foolish: Exposing the Dark Side of the Personal Finance Industry with host Michel Martin.

Governing
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Can Michigan Right The Ship For Detroit?

If Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has his way, Detroit will become the sixth and largest city there to come under state control. But steering a city out of crisis can be a tricky task. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jerome Vaughn, of WDET, and Robert Bobb, a former emergency financial manager for Detroit Public Schools, about the situation.

Shots - Health News
11:09 am
Tue March 5, 2013

A Costly Catch-22 In States Forgoing Medicaid Expansion

Outside the office of Utah Gov. Herbert Friday, Betsy Ogden lays paper chains on a pile symbolizing uninsured state residents who would be covered by a Medicaid expansion.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:08 pm

Poor adults who live in states that don't go along with the federal health overhaul's expansion of Medicaid face a double whammy.

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