National

The Salt
1:16 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Give Me Liberty, And Give Me Government-Subsidized Broccoli

Most people polled in a new survey said government programs to make fresh fruits and vegetables more affordable sound like a great idea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 12:32 pm

Americans are all for government efforts to get them to eat more healthfully, as long as they don't feel like they're being bullied into it. That's what people said in a new survey about government efforts to influence how we eat, like New York City's ban on supersized sodas.

In the past decade, state and federal governments have launched dozens of new laws and programs to promote healthful eating and exercise. They've put a lot of effort into measuring what works, but surprisingly little effort into finding out what the people at the receiving end think.

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Cyclists Do Not Emit More Carbon Than Cars, State Legislator Admits

Ed Orcutt has apologized for saying "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider," after an email with a bike shop owner sparked criticism. Here, a cyclist rides in Seattle last year." href="/post/cyclists-do-no-emit-more-carbon-cars-state-legislator-admits" class="noexit lightbox">
Washington State Rep. Ed Orcutt has apologized for saying "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider," after an email with a bike shop owner sparked criticism. Here, a cyclist rides in Seattle last year.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 1:19 pm

Days after angering cyclists with his contention that people who ride bikes don't help pay for roads — and stating that "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider," Washington State Rep. Ed Orcutt has apologized for his words, and any confusion they created.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

U.S. Speedskating Investigating Sexual Abuse Allegations

Speedskater Bridie Farrell competing last Friday in Kearns, Utah. Now 31, she says she was 15 when a much older teammate began sexually abusing her.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:17 pm

Yet another scandal has hit U.S. Speedskating (USS), which governs the sport with the biggest haul of winter Olympic medals for Team USA.

The USS board announced Monday night that it is investigating allegations of sexual abuse involving short track silver medalist Andy Gabel, now 48, who also once served as president of USS.

"U.S. Speedskating will not tolerate abuse of any kind and we intend to investigate these claims, and any others that arise, thoroughly," the group said in a written statement.

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Economy
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Not Having Kids Bad For The Economy?

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the part of the program where we usually check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and parenting advice. Today, though, we decided on a very different conversation about choosing not to be a parent.

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Your Money
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

'Tax Girl' Answers Your Questions

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:03 pm

Tax season is here and like a Facebook relationship, 'it's complicated.' That's according to Kelly Phillips Erb, the self-proclaimed 'tax girl.' She joins host Michel Martin to answer common tax conundrums.

Your Money
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Financial Advisors Selling Bogus Advice?

Skipping $4 lattes will save you some money — but buying into bogus financial advice won't. Finance journalist, Helaine Olen says many of the so-called 'financial experts' are selling you advice to make themselves rich. She discusses her book, Pound Foolish: Exposing the Dark Side of the Personal Finance Industry with host Michel Martin.

Governing
11:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Can Michigan Right The Ship For Detroit?

If Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has his way, Detroit will become the sixth and largest city there to come under state control. But steering a city out of crisis can be a tricky task. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jerome Vaughn, of WDET, and Robert Bobb, a former emergency financial manager for Detroit Public Schools, about the situation.

Shots - Health News
11:09 am
Tue March 5, 2013

A Costly Catch-22 In States Forgoing Medicaid Expansion

Outside the office of Utah Gov. Herbert Friday, Betsy Ogden lays paper chains on a pile symbolizing uninsured state residents who would be covered by a Medicaid expansion.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:08 pm

Poor adults who live in states that don't go along with the federal health overhaul's expansion of Medicaid face a double whammy.

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The Salt
11:05 am
Tue March 5, 2013

From Crock-Pots to 'Cook-Overs': Your Dinnertime Confessional Tips

Meals On The Run
Dinnertime Confessional Tumblr

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:14 pm

We touched a nerve recently when we asked about dinnertime as part of On the Run, our series exploring how crucial everyday decisions are made about food and exercise.

"No matter how close a relationship I develop with the Crock-Pot," wrote mom Celeste Higgins, it's still hard to get dinner on the table before 8 p.m.

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The Two-Way
10:42 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Justin Bieber Apologizes For Delay In Start Of London Concert

Justin Bieber performs live at 02 Arena on Monday.
Jim Dyson Getty Images

Screaming, crying fans are par for the course if you're teen idol Justin Bieber. But this is a bit different.

After a Monday concert at London's O2 Arena that reportedly started two hours late, the 19-year-old pop star has been forced to apologize for upsetting disappointed young concertgoers and their angry parents.

In a series of tweets Tuesday, Bieber issued his mea culpa:

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Shots - Health News
10:08 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Often A Health Care Laggard, U.S. Shines In Cancer Treatment

The U.S. ranks first in the world at stopping brain cancers, epidemiologists reported Monday. Here neurosurgeon Dr. Roger Hudgins and his assistant, Holly Zeller of Akron, Ohio, look at an MRI scan before performing surgery to remove a brain tumor.
Mike Cardew MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 7:04 am

When it comes to the state of the nation's health, the U.S. seems to get one poor grade after another. Despite spending more on health care, we've been slipping behind other high-income countries for life expectancy and healthy living.

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Around the Nation
7:15 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Wash. Lawmaker Apologizes For Cyclist Comment

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. When Washington state lawmakers proposed a new tax on bikes, the owner of several bike shops protested and ended up in an email argument with a Republican lawmaker, who shot back a novel claim.

State Sen. Ed Orcutt argued that cyclists pollute just by breathing. It is true that a heavy breathing cyclist will emit more carbon dioxide than a person who's just sitting. Orcutt did reconsider, and apologized.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
5:18 am
Tue March 5, 2013

U.S. Readies For Play In World Baseball Classic

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:33 am

With baseball gone from the Olympics, the World Baseball Classic is the only international professional baseball tournament. Former Yankees and Dodgers manager Joe Torre said he put on a uniform again to manage the U.S. team because it's a privilege.

Politics
5:18 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Analyzing Jeb Bush's Immigration Position

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:39 am

In the past, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush favored a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, but in a new book, he modifies that position to call for requiring illegal immigrants to leave the U.S. and re-apply to enter if they want to pursue citizenship.

Television
5:15 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Nicki Minaj Challenges 'Idol's' Inflexible Formula

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:35 am

As Fox's American Idol moves through its 12th season, it's hard to remember this show was once so popular it clobbered any new series scheduled against it. With ratings down almost 50 percent from its height, the brightest star is new judge Nicki Minaj — because she might understand the show better than anyone. TV critic Eric Deggans explains.

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