National

The Salt
3:17 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Rip'n Chick'n

This is what it looks like.
NPR

The fried chicken chain Popeye's, named because Popeye famously ate cans of fried chicken to make himself big and strong, is offering "Rip'n Chick'n." In so doing, they've accomplished what the great poets thought impossible: rhyme "chicken" and "ripping," and serve people a hand-shaped piece of chicken.

Eva: So you're telling me chickens could have been collecting their own eggs all this time.

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Around the Nation
2:49 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

A Week After Marathon Bombing, The Mood In Boston

News of the bombings at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013 made headlines around the world. Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy talks about the significance of the events for himself and fellow Bostonians one week after the attack.

Health
2:18 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Learning To Live As An Amputee

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Too many of those injured in Boston last Monday lost limbs in the explosion and now face a long and difficult recovery. Because the pressure-cooker bombs were in bags placed on the sidewalk, the shrapnel maimed and shredded many people's legs. Their basic challenge, of course, is to walk again. But the physical, mental and emotional process stretches far beyond those first steps.

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National Security
2:12 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

What's Next In The Boston Marathon Investigation

After a swift investigation, law enforcement identified the suspects as brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. As investigators piece together a timeline and motive, many questions are still unanswered. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston explains where the investigation goes from here.

Author Interviews
2:04 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Zoobiquity': What Humans Can Learn From Animal Illness

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:05 am

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, a cardiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, coined the term "zoobiquity" to describe the idea of looking to animals and the doctors who care for them to better understand human health. Veterinary medicine had not been on her radar at all until about 10 years ago. That's when she was asked to join the medical advisory board for the Los Angeles Zoo and she began hearing about "congestive heart failure in a gorilla or leukemia in a rhinoceros or breast cancer in a tiger or a lion."

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It's All Politics
1:33 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Managing Tragedy': A Defining Moment For Civic Leaders

Mayor Thomas Menino, who is recovering from a broken leg unrelated to the bombing, watches on as President Obama speaks during an interfaith healing service last week following the Boston Marathon blasts.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:24 pm

Some people are born to be pastors or therapists, but no one goes into politics expecting to help people with grief.

Yet mayors and governors often find themselves having to cope with tragedy. A tornado. A bombing. The death of a police officer, or a little girl.

It becomes an essential part of the job more often than they might expect. While they're rarely prepared for it, how they respond will define their time in office perhaps more than any other act.

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Monkey See
1:25 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Agony, Ecstasy, Irony: The Fight For The Soul Of College A Cappella

The Nor'easters, of Northeastern University, perform at the International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella on Saturday night.
Joe Martinez

Saturday night at Town Hall in New York, the Nor'easters of Northeastern University in Boston were crowned national champions at the International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA), the entirely real battle dramatized in last summer's surprise hit Pitch Perfect.

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Latin America
1:03 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

In Gritty Sao Paulo, Artists Take To The Streets

A portrait is projected on the walls of a building as part of a project promoting art through re-evaluating urban spaces and buildings in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Nov. 22.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:52 pm

It's lunchtime in the heart of Sao Paulo's financial district. Surrounded by tall buildings of cool glass and steel, men and women in suits and business attire walk back and forth busily in Brazil's largest city.

Standing amid the bustle is Leticia Matos — who is, for want of a better word, a crochet artist. She couldn't look more different from the people around her.

Wearing a short-sleeve shirt and covered in bright, quirky tattoos, Matos is at work, too. About a year ago, she says, she got the idea for her project while knitting and crocheting with her friends.

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Television
1:02 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Rectify': An Ex-Con Navigates The World Outside

Daniel (Aden Young) finds a supporter in the devout Tawney (Adelaide Clemens) — if not among all of his other neighbors — when he's exonerated after spending more than 19 years in prison for a crime he did't commit.
Sundance Film Channel

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:05 am

Rectify, a new drama series from the Sundance Channel, wants to stand out from the pack — and it certainly succeeds at that. It's a six-hour limited series, more along the British model of TV than ours here in the States. If these first six installments catch on enough, the story will continue. If not, that's it.

And Rectify is so unusual a show, with its own deliberate pace and premise and approach, that it may not build enough viewership to keep going. But that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile show, or a memorable one — because it is.

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Shots - Health News
12:45 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

As Injuries Rise, More Calls to Refuse The 'Cinnamon Challenge'

An undated photo provided by Frederick Reed shows Dejah Reed, an Ypsilanti, Mich., teen who was hospitalized for a collapsed lung after trying the cinnamon challenge.
Frederick Reed AP

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 12:16 pm

It's hard to stop a fad, even one that sometimes goes bad.

But it's time to end the so-called cinnamon challenge, doctors say.

If you're one of the few who hasn't heard about it already, that's probably a good thing.

The game, if you want to call it that, involves trying to quickly swallow a spoonful of ground cinnamon without the benefit of anything to wash it down. It's practically impossible.

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Author Interviews
11:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Teaching Shakespeare In A Maximum Security Prison

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 12:01 pm

Many people thought Laura Bates was out of her mind when she offered to teach Shakespeare in the maximum security wing of an Indiana prison. But the prisoners found a deep connection with the playwright's words. Laura Bates talks about her experience in her new book Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

Digital Life
11:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Boston Bombing Sparks Firestorm Of Internet Hate

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. The suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings have been identified as ethnic Chechen immigrants. So you might be wondering what, if anything, does that have to do with any alleged behavior that they were participating in. We'll find out more about Chechnya's history and politics, in just a few minutes.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
10:18 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Boston's Lockdown A Rare Aspect Of Bombing Investigation

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

One of the most startling aspects of Friday's bombing investigation was the shutdown of most of a major metropolitan area. That's rarely, if ever, happened in quite this way. The people around Boston affected Juliette Kayyem, who will talk with us about what this means. She's a former top Homeland Security official from Massachusetts and for the Obama administration. She is now a columnist for the Boston Globe, and her family was locked down on Friday in the Boston area. Welcome to the program, Juliette.

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Around the Nation
8:05 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Golden Retrievers Sent To Help Boston Heal

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. As Boston begins healing, they are getting a little help from man's best friend. Five Golden Retrievers: Addie, Isaiah, Luther, Maggie and Ruthie. They're comfort dogs sent by Lutheran Church Charities in Illinois. One of their jobs: just be ready if someone needs a friend to hug.

The Two-Way
8:01 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Midwest's Floods Aren't Over, But So Far, So Good

As the Mississippi River has risen in St. Louis, the city's Lewis and Clark statue has — as often happens in the spring — been partially submerged.
Bill Greenblatt UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 12:51 pm

The good news is that "the big river didn't get too big," The St. Louis Post-Dispatch writes this morning.

"Sandbags held back the cresting Mississippi River from several towns north of St. Louis on Sunday," it adds, "while the forecast for the immediate vicinity remained high but manageable."

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