National

Shots - Health News
10:19 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Annals Of The Obvious: Women Way More Tired Than Men

DRB Images LLC iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:00 am

Feeling run down? Dog-tired?

Who isn't, right?

But who's more exhausted: men or women?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the answer, though it's one that you probably could have arrived at without a second's thought.

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NPR Story
10:03 am
Fri April 12, 2013

The Violence Within Us

This episode, TED speakers uncover surprising realities about violence.
Sascha Burkard iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 3:10 pm

Violence and brutality are grim realities of life. Are some of us born that way, or can anyone be pushed into committing acts of cruelty? In this hour, TED speakers explore the sinister side of human nature, and whether we're all capable of violence.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
10:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

What Does The Mind Of A Killer Look Like?

Jim Fallon's work analyzing the brains of psychopaths lead to a surprising personal discovery.
Michael Brands TED / Michael Brands

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:45 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Jim Fallon's TEDTalk

Psychopathic killers are the basis for some must-watch TV, but what really makes them tick? Neuroscientist Jim Fallon talks about brain scans and genetic analysis that may uncover the rotten wiring in the nature (and nurture) of murderers. In a too-strange-for-fiction twist, he shares a fascinating family history that makes his work chillingly personal.

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TED Radio Hour
10:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Why Do Good People Do Bad Things?

Philip Zimbardo explains his infamous Stanford Prison experiment at a TED conference.
TED

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:20 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Philip Zimbardo's TEDTalk

Philip Zimbardo knows how easy it is for nice people to turn bad. He also understands the flip side: how easy it is to be a hero, and how we can rise to the challenge.

About Philip Zimbardo

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TED Radio Hour
10:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Why Don't Domestic Violence Victims Leave?

Leslie Morgan Steiner shares her story of domestic abuse at TEDxRainier.
TED

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:45 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Violence Within Us.

About Leslie Morgan Steiner's TEDTalk

Leslie Morgan Steiner was in "crazy love" — that is, madly in love with a man who routinely abused her and threatened her life. Steiner tells the harrowing story of her relationship, correcting misconceptions many people hold about victims of domestic violence.

About Leslie Morgan Steiner

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Monkey See
9:13 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Mad Men,' Madmen And A Fond Farewell

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

With Trey out this week, we called upon one of our very favorite people, Barrie Hardymon, to join us. We start this week with a discussion of the two-hour season opener of Mad Men, which isn't dropping any major bombs about plot, I don't think, but which isn't tiptoeing either, so use your judgment. We talk about Stephen's first exposure to the much-honored series, the reasons why Barrie likes it better when it stays in the office, how things are changing as we cruise into the late '60s, and why Peggy is really just the best thing ever.

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Explosives Said To Be In Package Addressed To Sheriff Arpaio

Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio.
Laura Segall Reuters /Landov

Authorities in Arizona say a package addressed to controversial Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was safely destroyed Thursday after a test for explosive residue confirmed it "contained black powder," The Arizona Republic writes.

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Politics
6:19 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Vote Forces Senate To Talk About Gun Control

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Steve Inskeep is reporting for us this week from Caracas, Venezuela. I'm David Greene, in Washington, Where the Senate is now officially moving towards debate on gun control legislation. To get there, Democratic leaders had to defeat a Republican filibuster yesterday, and they did so with the help of 16 Republicans. The procedural vote was a victory for gun control supporters, but as NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, more battles lie ahead.

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Business
6:15 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Ex-KPMG Partner Accused Of Insider Trading

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Los Angeles, a former partner at KPMG, one of the big four accounting firms, has been charged with insider trading.

As NPR's Nina Gregory reports, Scott London is accused of trading tips for money and gifts.

NINA GREGORY, BYLINE: The details in the Justice Department's criminal complaint against Scott London read like bad fiction. Bags of hundred dollar bills wrapped in $10,000 bundles, a Rolex worth an estimated twelve-thousand dollars, secrets shared at the country club and covert recordings of phone calls.

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StoryCorps
3:33 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Adoptive Dad Dreamed A Dream That Brought Him A Son

John Curtis with his 11-year-old son, John Wikiera.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 4:19 pm

In 1998, John Curtis and David Wikiera adopted a son from Vietnam and named him John Wikiera.

"I had always wanted to be a parent," Curtis tells his now 11-year-old son during a visit to StoryCorps in Rochester, N.Y. "So it was a dream I had, but I never dreamed would come true because Papa and I are gay. But we had some friends who started thinking about adoption and that got us thinking.

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Around the Nation
6:03 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Frustration Mounts Over Unresolved Border Patrol Shootings

An investigator inspects a crime scene where a 16-year-old was shot. At least one U.S. Border Patrol agent shot into Mexico after rocks were thrown at him, hitting the teen.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 6:17 pm

Reducing illegal immigration — a key requirement for any immigration overhaul — is largely up to the U.S. Border Patrol. That agency has doubled in size over the past decade. It's now the largest law enforcement agency in the country.

Critics say the agency has become overly zealous in its mission and faces little accountability. In the past three years, agents have killed nearly 20 people along the Southwest border — and few of those cases have been resolved.

Rocks Thrown, Shots Fired

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Law
5:01 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Shop Owner Sued By State After Denying Flowers To Gay Couple

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

The Attorney General in the state of Washington is suing a small florist for refusing to provide flowers for a gay wedding.

U.S.
5:01 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Gun Registration Paper Trail Is Long And Convoluted

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Melissa Block talks with David Chipman, a retired agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, about the process set in motion when a buyer attempts to purchase a gun from a federally licensed firearms dealer.

U.S.
5:01 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Off-Limits Since Sept. 11, A Texas-Mexico Crossing Re-Opens

Catarino Oreste Vasquez, 70, says residents of Boquillas, Mexico, yearn for visitors now that the border crossing has reopened.
Lorne Matalon Marfa Public Radio

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Boquillas, Mexico, a riverside hamlet of 90 people, sits a minute by foot across the Rio Grande from Big Bend National Park in Texas, a boundless tapestry of rock and high desert. Mexicans used to cross to work, buy supplies in the park or visit family. Americans would wade across the river to savor Mexico for a few hours. The border, at least here, was an abstract one that people on either side ignored. But that was before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Afterward, this part of the border was sealed.

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Around the Nation
4:35 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Fair Or Foul? Pigeon Shoots Ruffle Feathers In Pennsylvania

A sportsman participates in a pigeon shoot in Pennsylvania in 2009. Animal-rights activists want to ban the tradition in the state.
The Humane Society of the United States

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Animal-rights activists are hoping for change in Pennsylvania, where they're fighting to end a tradition: live pigeon shoots. At the events, shooters compete to hit birds that are launched into the air.

Elissa Katz remembers feeling helpless at the site of a pigeon shoot, with feathers flying through the air and wounded birds falling to the ground. "They flutter up in the air as they are sprung from boxes. Shooters have shotguns, they are at fairly close range, and they blast away at the birds," she says.

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