National

Around the Nation
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Kids May Stay On Disability If Their Parents Rely On The Check

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

All this week, we've been talking about the growth in our nation's disability programs. We have explored some of the reasons for that growth: an aging workforce, off-shoring of jobs, the recession and a growing skills gap. As a result, millions of American workers are turning to disability.

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Around the Nation
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

New Jersey Residents Blame Increased Flooding On Superstorm Sandy

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Ever since Hurricane Sandy, officials in many New Jersey coastal communities have been reporting more flooding than usual. The National Weather Service confirms the state is experiencing an above average number of winter storms. But locals complain the high water isn't just coming more often and with greater intensity, it's coming regardless of rainfall.

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Environment
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Federal Budget Cuts Hamper Waste Cleanup At Washington Nuclear Reservation

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Washington State, radioactive waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation is leaking from underground containment tanks. The site contains the leftovers from plutonium production, some from World War II, most from the Cold War. And it turns out the federal budget sequester is slowing the cleanup.

From Richland, Washington, Anna King of the Northwest News Network has that story.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

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Around the Nation
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Boston's Longest-Serving Mayor Won't Seek Sixth Term

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Today at Faneuil Hall in Boston, the city's longest serving mayor, Tom Menino, made it official: He is not seeking re-election.

MAYOR TOM MENINO: I'm here with the people I love, to tell the city I love that I will leave the job that I love.

SIEGEL: All that love gives a sense of what drove Menino for nearly 20 years as mayor.

Bruce Gellerman of member station WBUR has this political profile.

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Shots - Health News
5:12 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Sand From Fracking Could Pose Lung Disease Risk To Workers

A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:50 pm

When workplace safety expert Eric Esswein got a chance to see fracking in action not too long ago, what he noticed was all the dust.

It was coming off big machines used to haul around huge loads of sand. The sand is a critical part of the hydraulic fracturing method of oil and gas extraction. After workers drill down into rock, they create fractures in that rock by pumping in a mixture of water, chemicals and sand. The sand keeps the cracks propped open so that oil and gas are released.

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Animals
4:15 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Algae Bloom Kills Record Number Of Florida Manatees

A rescued manatee suffering from exposure to an algae bloom called red tide in southwest Florida comes up for air as it swims into a critical care tank at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo.
Steve Nesius Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

More than 200 manatees have died in Florida's waterways since January from an algae bloom called red tide, just as wildlife officials try to remove the marine mammal from the endangered species list.

It used to be boat propellers that were the biggest killer of manatees, but red tide has been especially bad this year.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officer Steve Rice routinely scours the Caloosahatchee River in southwest Florida for dead manatees. He has found more than 20 in the past few weeks.

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Law
2:14 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

The Road To The Supreme Court Arguments On Gay Marriage

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:27 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. Yesterday the Supreme Court heard the last of two cases involving the issue of same-sex marriage, one case on the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8. That proposition banned same-sex marriage in the state of California. The other case is on the Defense of Marriage Act.

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Digital Life
2:01 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Exploring The World's Highest Peaks From Your Couch

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:27 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
1:08 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

'Love Your Butt' Campaign Tries To Conquer Colonoscopy Fears

Cute it may be. But will it convince you to get a colonoscopy?
loveyourbutt.org

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:50 pm

The billboard in Washington, D.C.'s Metro stopped me in my tracks on the way to work: "Love Your Patooty."

An advertisement for yoga pants? Padded chairs? No.

Closer examination revealed it was encouraging me to get a colonoscopy.

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Around the Nation
12:00 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Maybe We Should Retire The Word 'Retire'

The official portrait of retirement has changed, and it didn't change to this.
iStockphoto.com

Retirement ads are everywhere these days. The Villages lures retirees to come live, love and golf in Florida. USAA offers financial counsel to retiring military personnel.

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Sports
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Busted Brackets: Therapy For Sports Fanatics

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 1:52 pm

Die-hard fans of Georgetown, Gonzaga and other colleges are feeling down in the dumps after their favored teams lost early in the NCAA basketball tournament. But when do the March Madness blues go too far? Host Michel Martin discusses the psychology of sports fanaticism with professor Don Forsyth of the University of Richmond.

Can I Just Tell You?
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Martin Recalls The Supreme Court 34 Years Ago

Jose Luis Magana ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 4:09 pm

Finally, the pictures of people camping out in the cold outside the Supreme Court, so they could get in to hear the oral arguments on marriage equality, brought back memories for me.

You might not believe this, but on this very day in 1979 my buddy Dave and I walked into the court after having done the same thing — although I confess we weren't as smart about it as the people were this week. We had nothing — no tent, no tarp — just our notebooks and some hot tea we bought at the train station.

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History
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

The People Behind Guthrie's 'Deportee' Verses

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 2:00 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We want to turn, now, to a current effort to address a decades-old tragedy. In 1948, a U.S. Immigration Service plane carrying undocumented immigrants from California to Mexico, crashed. All 32 people onboard were killed. But while news accounts listed the names of the four people in the flight crew, the 28 undocumented victims were just listed as Mexican deportees.

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Religion
11:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Bishop: 'I See Marriage As A Sacred Institution'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, if you follow sports you might have sympathy - or not - for heartbroken March Madness fans whose schools have already flunked out. We're going to ask why we care so much when our brackets are broken. That conversation is in just a few minutes. But first we want to return to two important cases being argued in the Supreme Court this week.

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Shots - Health News
10:11 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Why More Patients Should Blog About Illness And Death

David Oliver sits quietly as he waits for the results of a scan at Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., in 2012. The University of Missouri research professor was diagnosed with cancer in September 2011. He broke the news to colleagues via a video on the Internet.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:51 pm

I entered the world of illness blogs for the first time when I learned through Facebook that a friend from middle school passed away last Friday from acute myeloid leukemia. In the three months between his diagnosis and his death, the friend, whom I'll call Tom, blogged beautifully and intimately on CaringBridge, a Web tool designed to help the seriously ill tell their stories and manage communication with friends and family.

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