National

Shots - Health News
10:47 am
Tue April 9, 2013

State Laws Could Muddle Same-Sex Marriage Benefits

Till death do us part, so let's figure out this insurance mess.
iStockphoto.com

Even if the Supreme Court sweeps aside barriers to federal- and state-sanctioned same-sex marriages this summer, where you live and work may still affect your access to health insurance benefits for a same-sex spouse.

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Remembrances
4:59 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Mouseketeer Annette Funicello Dies At 70

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Annette Funicello was the most popular member of the original 1950's "Mickey Mouse Club" television series. She's also remembered for starring in 1960s beach party movies. Funicello died yesterday at the age of 70, after decades of fighting multiple sclerosis.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco remembers her freshly-scrubbed public image.

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Sports
4:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Louisville Triumphs Over Michigan 82-76

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Tuesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Steve Inskeep is on a reporting trip this week in Venezuela. I'm David Greene in Washington.

The University of Louisville are the new champions of men's college basketball. They beat the University of Michigan Wolverines 82-to-76 last night in Atlanta. For the Cardinals, this victory was the finale to a post season that involved overcoming so many deficits.

Here's NPR's Mike Pesca.

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Business
4:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

BP Trial Update

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In a courtroom in New Orleans, the oil giant BP has begun presenting its defense in a case connected to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Plaintiffs include individuals and businesses hurt by the spill, as well as and state and federal governments. And they've argued BP was grossly negligent in drilling the deep water well.

But now it's BP's turn. The company argues that contractors who helped it drill should share the blame for the accident, which killed 11 workers and spilled more than four million barrels of oil.

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Business
4:29 am
Tue April 9, 2013

J.C. Penney CEO Johnson Is Forced Out

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with J.C. Penney's revolving door.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: J.C. Penney has ousted its high-profile CEO, Ron Johnson. The retailer recruited Johnson from Apple, to revitalize the company. But since his arrival less than 18 months ago, things at J.C. Penney have only gotten worse.

Here's NPR's Wendy Kaufman.

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Animals
2:58 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Starving Baby Sea Lions Flood Southern California Shores

More and more starving sea lions are being found stranded on California shores, and animal rehabilitation centers are at their maximum capacity. Experts say there are fewer fish for these mammals to feed on, but they don't know why.
Gloria Hillard NPR

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:14 am

In recent months, more than 1,000 starving baby sea lions have been found on Southern California beaches, from Santa Barbara to San Diego. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has just declared the crisis an "unusual mortality event."

On a recent early morning, Peter Wallerstein is on the job on a beach near Marina del Rey, Calif. His white truck is a familiar sight along this coastline. Next to him, a small blond dog named Pumpkin rides shotgun.

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Shots - Health News
2:58 am
Tue April 9, 2013

The 'Hard To Change' Legacy Of Medicare Payments

President Obama's budget plan for fiscal year 2014 may include a proposal for Medicare patients to pay more of their own medical bills.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 9:14 am

The budget President Obama will send to Congress Wednesday is expected to include some $400 billion in reductions to Medicare and other health programs.

And if the word around Washington is correct, it may also include a proposal aimed at winning some bipartisan backing — by changing the way Medicare patients pay for their care.

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Reporter's Notebook
6:15 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Iowa Town Braces For New Reality In Factory Closure's Wake

Main Street in Webster City, Iowa, has so far survived the 2011 closure of an Electrolux factory. But retraining funds and unemployment are running out for former workers, leaving businesses worried that a serious downturn is ahead.
Andrea Hsu NPR

What becomes of a city of 8,000 people when its main employer leaves town? What does it look like, and what does it feel like? I set out to answer those questions on a trip to Webster City, Iowa, last month, as part of my report on the Swedish appliance maker Electrolux.

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It's All Politics
6:09 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Sequester Uncertainty Surrounds Section 8 Housing Program

Members of the American Federation of Government Employees protest mandatory federal budget cuts during a rally March 20 in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:16 pm

Last week, several media outlets and advocacy groups began circulating the same sad story: Because of sequestration, 60 low-income families in Dane County, Wis., were soon to be homeless.

But the truth is more complicated.

The story began with a blog post written in February by Dane County Housing Authority Executive Director Rob Dicke.

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Monkey See
5:59 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

A Tip Of The Mouse Ears To Annette Funicello, 1942-2013

The American actress and singer Annette Funicello, photographed here circa 1960, died April 8, more than two decades after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.
Henry Gris, FPG Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Now it's time to say goodbye to former Mouseketeer Annette Funicello. The singer, dancer and actress died April 8 at the age of 70, having battled multiple sclerosis for more than two decades.

Throughout her career, she was devoted to Walt Disney, who famously discovered her during a Swan Lake dance recital when she was just 12 years old.

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Shots - Health News
5:59 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Would Angry Teens Chill Out If They Saw More Happy Faces?

Researchers say that aggressive people tend to interpret ambiguous faces as reflecting hostility.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

All day long we're surrounded by faces. We see them on the subway sitting two by two, pass them on the sidewalk as we make our way to work, then nod to them in the elevator.

But most of those faces don't tell us much about the emotional life of the person behind the face.

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Business
5:19 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

One Manufacturing Giant Creates Winners And Losers

Electrolux's new plant in Memphis, Tenn., is the Swedish appliance company's most modern and high-tech facility. The factory will open this summer while an Electrolux plant in Quebec, Canada, is being shuttered.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

The United States lost close to 6 million manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2009. Now, slowly, some of those jobs are coming back. Over the past three years, the U.S. economy has gained a half-million manufacturing jobs.

But even with the manufacturing recovery, there are both winners and losers — and sometimes they're created by the same company.

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Around the Nation
4:50 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

BP Witness Says Company Drilled Well Safely Prior To Spill

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The federal civil trial stemming from the massive 2010 Gulf Oil Spill has entered its seventh week in New Orleans. Plaintiffs - people affected by the spill - have laid out their case, arguing that oil giant BP was grossly negligent in its operation of the deep offshore well, and that led to the accident that killed 11 people and launched the four million-barrel spill. This morning, BP began presenting the company's defense against those claims.

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Education
4:50 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Cursive Club Tries To Keep Handwriting Alive

New Jersey grandmother Sylvia Hughes last fall founded a club to teach school children cursive handwriting at her grandson's elementary school.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Cursive handwriting is disappearing from the list of required courses at U.S. schools, so one New Jersey grandmother is making sure her grandson's schoolmates know how to loop their Ls and curl their Qs.

At first, 45 students signed up for the cursive club that Sylvia Hughes founded last fall at Nellie K. Parker Elementary School. But then the club grew to 60 8- and 9-year olds.

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Around the Nation
3:55 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Struggling W.Va. Town Hopes Boy Scout Camp Brings New Life

Mount Hope, W.Va., population 1,400, was once a thriving coal town. Today, many of the storefronts in its tiny downtown sit empty.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Picture a tiny town set along a creek in West Virginia. A mountain rises from the town's eastern edge, overlooking the 1,400 people living below. Then, July comes — and 50,000 people arrive on that mountain for the National Scout Jamboree.

The town is called Mount Hope. I've heard some call it "Mount Hopeless." The town went through the long, downward slump from the boom days of deep-mine coal, when it was a grand, small-town capital of coal mining.

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