National

Radio Expeditions
11:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Wealth Gap: Wide And Getting Wider

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to talk now about new research on the wealth gap between white and black families in the U.S. According to a federal survey, the median black family has five cents for every dollar of wealth owned by their white counterparts. Now, that gap is obviously very large, but it is also growing. We wanted to talk more about this, so we've called Washington Post reporter Michael Fletcher, who wrote about this recently. And he's with us from The Washington Post's studios.

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Business
11:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Yahoo: A Telecommunication Breakdown?

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, it's been called a landmark in the American literary canon. Certainly it's one of the premier works of Chicano literature. Now it's finally made its way to the big screen. We are going to speak with its star, herself a well-loved pioneer among Latina actresses. Her name is Miriam Colon and she's with us in just a few minutes to tell us about "Bless Me, Ultima."

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Monkey See
11:48 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Are Romantic Comedies Dead?

Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant in Bringing Up Baby.
AP

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:45 am

The March issue of The Atlantic features an essay from Christopher Orr called "Why Are Romantic Comedies So Bad?"* In it, Orr asserts that romantic comedies have been "lackluster for decades." Decades.

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Shots - Health News
11:19 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Mouse Study Sheds Light On Why Some Cancer Vaccines Fail

A simple switch of ingredients made a big difference in how mice responded to experimental cancer vaccines.
Andrei Tchernov iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:31 pm

In the quest for better cancer medicines, vaccines that treat rather than prevent disease are getting lots of attention.

More than 90 clinical trials have tested therapeutic vaccines in cancer patients, but the results have been a mixed bag.

A recent study in mice suggests that changing a traditional ingredient in the vaccines could make a big difference.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Heartbreak In NYC: Parents Die In Crash; Baby Is Delivered But Later Dies

Mourners lined the street Sunday outside a synagogue in Brooklyn where funeral services were held for Raizy and Nathan Glauber.
Verena Dobnik AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:04 am

A young couple head to a hospital because the wife, who is about seven months pregnant, isn't feeling well. Then, tragedy strikes.

It's a heartbreaking story that is making headlines in New York City.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Mon March 4, 2013

At Florida Sinkhole, Demolition Continues

In Seffner, Fla., on Sunday, demolition crews and firefighters watched as a crane operator worked to bring down the home where a man was sucked into a sinkhole last week.
Scott Audette Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 10:54 am

The grim work continues at a home near Tampa, Fla., where a man apparently died last week when a sinkhole opened up under his bedroom.

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Around the Nation
7:09 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Lock-Picking Class Is Popular In Oakland

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Burglary is a big problem in Oakland, California. So Mayor Jean Quan opened the door to some harsh criticism when her weekly newsletter of community events advertised a lock-picking class. Learn the art for only $40. Some residents were unhinged, but organizers say the course is for hobbyists, not criminals. The mayor apologized, but the advertising seems to have worked - the class was sold out. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:59 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Mom Saves Baby From Deadly Drop Out Of Window

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

A woman in Spokane, Washington stepped out of the shower and into a moment of terror. Her 14-month-old boy was bouncing on the bed. He bounced out a half-open second-story window. She dove after the boy, smashed through the window, grabbed his foot as he was tumbling down the porch roof and lowered the kid safely to his grandma, who was smoking on the porch.

The mom then crashed into a bush. She's scraped up. The baby is fine.

Around the Nation
5:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Hard-Hit Boise Subdivision Lacks Owner-Occupied Homes

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The housing market is recovering in much of the country, not so much in Idaho. Home prices dropped by 46 percent in the Boise area during the financial crises. Forty-six percent. Today's business bottom line takes us to the home of a family that rode out the crash and are still waiting for better times. Here's Molly Messick of Boise State Public Radio.

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Selma Marchers Remind Justices Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Will Emergency Manager Help Or Hurt Detroit?

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Residents of Detroit are absorbing the message sent by Michigan's governor. Rick Snyder swept aside the city's elected officials. He's using his power to appoint an emergency manager to take over city finances. Residents are deeply divided about this move, as we hear from Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Nobody had a comment in regards to the lighting problem?

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Wood From The Hood Reclaims Urban Timber For Local Use

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We are often urged to buy local, but when people say that, we're usually thinking about food. Now it seems you can aim for local furniture and local building materials. Matt Sepic of Minnesota Public Radio reports on the Minneapolis business that makes everything from hardwood flooring to picture frames from trees cut just down the block.

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The Salt
3:25 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Selling Kids On Veggies When Rules Like 'Clean Your Plate' Fail

Good advice, but strict rules at mealtime may backfire.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 5:14 pm

If you're a parent, you've probably heard remarks like this during dinner: "I don't like milk! My toast is burnt! I hate vegetables! I took a bite already! What's for dessert?" It can be daunting trying to ensure a healthy diet for our children. So it's no wonder parents often resort to dinner time rules.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Your Child's Fat, Mine's Fine: Rose-Colored Glasses And The Obesity Epidemic

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:30 pm

About 69 percent of American adults are overweight or obese, and more than four in five people say they are worried about obesity as a public health problem.

But a recent poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health revealed a curious schism in our national attitudes toward obesity: Only one in five kids had a parent who feared the boy or girl would grow up to be overweight as an adult.

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Shots - Health News
4:41 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Scientists Report First Cure Of HIV In A Child, Say It's A Game-Changer

HIV particles, yellow, infect an immune cell, blue.
NIAID_Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:35 pm

Scientists believe a little girl born with HIV has been cured of the infection.

She's the first child and only the second person in the world known to have been cured since the virus touched off a global pandemic nearly 32 years ago.

Doctors aren't releasing the child's name, but we know she was born in Mississippi and is now 2 1/2 years old — and healthy. Scientists presented details of the case Sunday at a scientific conference in Atlanta.

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