National

U.S.
5:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Overrun By Otters, Illinois Reinstates Trapping Season

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Just over a couple of decades ago, there were fewer than 100 otters remaining in the state of Illinois. Today, there are at least 15,000. They're furry and cute and a nuisance to some, often called the raccoons of Illinois waterways. What's wrong with raccoons? Anyway. So for the first time in almost 90 years, Illinois has reinstated otter trapping season. We called Bob Bluett, a biologist with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

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U.S.
5:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

'Giving Tuesday': The Start Of A Holiday Tradition?

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 4:50 pm

First, there was the post-Thanksgiving sales spectacle Black Friday and then the online version, Cyber Monday. Now, charitable groups want to start a new holiday tradition — it's called Giving Tuesday and the first one is tomorrow.

It may seem a little surprising that no one came up with the idea before of designating a specific day to help launch the holiday charitable giving season.

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Shots - Health News
5:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Give And Take: How The Rule Of Reciprocation Binds Us

A Hare Krishna distributes food gifts from a chariot during a festival in London in 2011. The religious group began distributing books, flowers and gifts to strangers in the 1970s, drawing on the rule of reciprocation to raise money.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 9:44 am

In 1974, Phillip Kunz and his family got a record number of Christmas cards. In the weeks before Christmas they came daily, sometimes by the dozen. Kunz still has them in his home, collected in an old photo album.

"Dear Phil, Joyce and family," a typical card reads, "we received your holiday greeting with much joy and enthusiasm ... Merry Christmas and Happy New Year's. Love Lou, Bev and the children."

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Around the Nation
5:11 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

N.H. Group Says People, Not Taxes, Should Help Needy

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 5:33 pm

This is the time of year when people all over the country are coming together and getting food to needy families, but for one community in Manchester, N.H., private acts of charity aren't just a holiday tradition — they are a display of anarchist and libertarian principles.

On a recent day, about 50 people gathered in a converted office space with $6,000 worth of food and a list of needy families. Mike Ruff, with help from a couple of kids, filled shopping bags with food for the hungry.

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Around the Nation
5:00 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

Disaster Donations Surge, But What About Tomorrow?

A member of the Red Cross distributes food to residents of Coney Island affected by Superstorm Sandy in the Brooklyn, N.Y., on Nov. 9.
John Minchillo AP

More than $174 million in donations has been raised for those affected in New York and New Jersey by Superstorm Sandy, which devastated parts of the Atlantic coast in late October.

"The more affluent and well-insured people will figure a way to recover their lives, but there are a lot of people in New York who really won't have that capacity and can't speak out for themselves," says Stacy Palmer, the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

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Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Awash With Love: Storm Resurfaces 1940s Letters

Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick found the storm-soaked stack of letters as they were walking along the New Jersey shore.
Lindsay Lazarski Newsworks.org

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 12:15 am

The weekend after Superstorm Sandy, Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick stumbled upon a bundle of letters while they were walking along the New Jersey shore near her home.

The letters were tied with a pink ribbon and thoroughly soaked. Some of the beautiful handwriting had blurred. Chaney took the bundle home, dried out the letters and began to read them.

They were written to a man named Lynn Farnham, signed by "your loving Dot." Chaney says the letters speak of true love and devotion.

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Around the Nation
12:03 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Some Oppose Plans To Raze Unique Chicago Edifice

The Prentice Women's Hospital in Chicago was named one of the 10 most endangered historic places in Illinois by the nonprofit group Landmarks Illinois.
Kiichiro Sato AP

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 1:00 pm

Walk through downtown Chicago and you experience modern architecture to its fullest. There's the Auditorium Building by Louis Sullivan, the Federal Center by Mies van der Rohe and Marina City by Bertrand Goldberg — two towers made even more famous after starring on an album cover by the Chicago band Wilco.

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U.S.
4:57 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

Legal Pot Is Here, But Stash The Wallet For Now

Legalized marijuana in Colorado and Washington state may open the door to a new kind of tourism.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Wed November 28, 2012 5:34 pm

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National Security
4:13 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

Border Killings Prompt Scrutiny Over Use Of Force

Pedestrians cross the street in Nogales, Mexico, near the border with Arizona. A U.S. Border Patrol agent shot and killed a 16-year-old boy who was throwing rocks near the border fence last month.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 6:26 pm

The Department of Homeland Security is examining its policy on deadly force along the U.S.-Mexico border. In less than two years, U.S. Border Patrol agents have killed 18 Mexican citizens there — including eight people who were throwing rocks.

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Around the Nation
6:34 am
Sat November 24, 2012

Home Sweet (Tiny) Home: S.F. Plans To Downsize

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 10:30 am

This week the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a pilot program to build apartments as small as 220 square feet. The experimental ordinance is prompted by rocketing real estate values in the city.

Around the Nation
5:26 am
Sat November 24, 2012

Strumming The Pain, Songwriters Play Vets' Stories

Songwriter Jay Clementi works on a song with Sgt. 1st Class Scott McRae at the weekend retreat near Fort Hood in Central Texas.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for NPR

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 12:25 pm

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The Two-Way
12:28 am
Sat November 24, 2012

'Dallas' Villain Larry Hagman Dies At 81

Actor Larry Hagman, star of the TV series Dallas, poses during the 2010 Monte Carlo Television Festival in Monaco on June 8, 2010.
Christian Alminana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 2:22 pm

Larry Hagman, who played the villain J.R. Ewing on television's long-running, prime-time soap opera Dallas, has died. He was 81.

A source close to Hagman confirmed his passing to NPR but would not speak on the record at the request of the family.

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World
2:31 pm
Fri November 23, 2012

Russia, U.S. Seek To Resolve Friction On Adoptions

Artyom Savelyev, now 9, was sent back to Russia on a plane by his adoptive U.S. mother in 2010. The case stirred anger in Russia.
Misha Japaridze AP

Originally published on Fri November 23, 2012 7:29 pm

Americans have been adopting Russian children in sizable numbers for two decades, and most of the unions have worked out well. But it remains a sensitive topic in Russia, where officials periodically point to high-profile cases of abuse or other problems.

Now, the two countries are putting the finishing touches on a new agreement governing these adoptions. It will make the process costlier and more time-consuming, but it's designed to address a host of concerns.

Some Russian officials still seem to bristle at the very thought of foreigners adopting Russian children.

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It's All Politics
8:54 am
Fri November 23, 2012

How To Oust A Congressman, SuperPAC-Style

U.S. Rep. Joe Baca of California, shown at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, learned the power of superPACs firsthand this year, when he lost for the first time since he was elected in 1999.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri November 23, 2012 1:53 pm

After spending millions of dollars in the presidential and Senate campaigns with little to show for it, many superPACs and other outside groups are still tending their wounds. But it's too soon to write off superPACs as a waste of wealthy donors' money.

Consider, for instance, this upset in a congressional race outside Los Angeles.

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Monkey See
8:37 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Out Of Season Entertainment And A TV Quiz

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We know you're traveling; we're traveling, too! But we thought we'd send the show out early, just in case you have time to throw it on your iPod before you go over the river and through the woods.

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