National

Remembrances
5:24 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Hairstylist Vidal Sassoon Was Fashion Revolutionary

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The beauty industry has lost one of its titans. The hair stylist Vidal Sassoon died today at his home in Los Angeles after suffering an undisclosed illness. He was 84. NPR's Neda Ulaby has this remembrance.

NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: Vidal Sassoon was emblematic of an era.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SHE LOVES YOU")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: One, two...

THE BEATLES: (Singing) She loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah. She loves you...

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NPR Story
4:59 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Texas Inmate Rivals Obama In W.Va. Primaries

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

There's not much news out of presidential primaries these days, but there was one surprise yesterday in West Virginia's Democratic primary. A convicted felon serving time in a Texas prison won 41 percent of the vote to President Obama's 59 percent.

For more on this unusual candidate and what his strong second-place showing says about Democratic voters in West Virginia, I'm joined from Charleston by Associated Press reporter Lawrence Messina.

Lawrence, welcome.

LAWRENCE MESSINA: Hi.

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The Salt
4:24 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Hospital Food So Fresh, Even The Healthy Come To Dine

Executive chef Tony DeWalt picks some lettuce from the Fauquier Hospital's culinary healing garden.
John Rose

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:48 am

Twice a week, local seniors in Warrenton, Virginia, flock to a hip new dinner spot called the Bistro on the Hill for good food, a great view, and musical accompaniment by a retired piano player from a nearby Nordstrom's.

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Monkey See
3:29 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

10 Things I Hate About 'American Idol' (Besides The Singing And The Judging)

Oh, get on with it: Ryan Seacrest's increasingly elaborate fake-outs when he's delivering results is just one of the most irritating things about the current season of American Idol.
Fox

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 5:17 pm

  1. Ryan Seacrest's double/triple/quadruple fakeouts. Our host used to screw with the contestants by teasing the results before throwing to a guest performance or commercial. Now he gives those results using sentences so convoluted, with so many double-backs and twist-arounds, that you need a white board to diagram them and unpack their actual meaning. Frustrating the singers, yes. Confusing them entirely, no.
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The Salt
2:37 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

What Our Gut Microbes Say About Us

The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis is a beautiful example of a gut microbe.
National Institutes of Health

What if it's not just our genes or our lifestyle, exactly, that makes us skinny or fat, healthy or sick? What if it's also the makeup of the bacterial ecosystem that inhabits our gut?

A growing pile of scientific studies is pointing us in that direction. Researchers in this hot new field describe the microbes in our gut as a vital organ that's as essential as our liver or kidneys. They're finding that this organ, which they call the "microbiome," varies greatly from person to person.

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Around the Nation
2:05 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Solo-Sailing The Americas: Pushing The Extremes

Matt Rutherford sailed for Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating, which gives sailing opportunities to people with mental and physical disabilities.
Mark Duehmig

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 11:24 am

On June 11, 2011, Matt Rutherford set sail from Annapolis, Md., on an epic voyage. He traveled down the Chesapeake Bay, up the East Coast, then through the Northwest Passage, down the Pacific, around Cape Horn, back up the coast of South America, and all the way back home.

In 10 months, he sailed over 27,000 miles in a 27-foot sailboat — named the St. Brendan after the 6th-century explorer — and became the first person to complete a solo, nonstop circumnavigation of the Americas.

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Fitness & Nutrition
12:38 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Stand Up, Walk Around, Even Just For '20 Minutes'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 1:14 pm

If you're sitting at a desk reading this article, take a minute and stand up. That's the latest advice from New York Times Phys Ed columnist Gretchen Reynolds. In her new book, The First 20 Minutes, Reynolds details some of the surprisingly simple ways you can combat the effects of a sedentary lifestyle.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:38 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

FDA Leans On Device Makers To Cut X-Ray Doses For Kids

Easy does it on the X-ray doses for kids.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 12:58 pm

The Food and Drug Administration has a proposition for the companies that make X-ray machines.

Make sure your new equipment has settings and instructions that minimize radiation hazards for kids, or the agency will look to slap a label on the machines that recommends they not be used for children at all.

The agency proposed the approach today (details in the Federal Register); it's the latest move to curb radiation hazards from imaging equipment.

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Science
11:55 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Memphis 'Fly Boys' Soar Into Rocketry Finals

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 1:18 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, we want to turn to a high school competition that is taking off this weekend, and no, we are not talking football or cheerleading. This is the finals of the nation's largest rocketry tournament. One hundred teens will gather for the Team America Rocketry Challenge this weekend in Washington, D.C.

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Around the Nation
11:51 am
Wed May 9, 2012

UN Explores Native American Rights In US

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 1:18 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, as a child, did you ever build a rocket? Well, how about one that can take two raw eggs 800 feet up and bring them back safely again? That's exactly what students from Memphis' Wooddale High School managed to do, and now they're competing in a national competition this weekend. We'll hear their inspiring story in just a few minutes.

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Author Interviews
11:44 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Creating A New Vision Of Islam In America

Feisal Abdul Rauf is the author of three books on Islam, including What's Right with Islam is What's Right with America.

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 1:54 pm

Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, a leading moderate Muslim leader in the U.S., was once the lead cleric associated with the proposed Islamic community center some critics called the "ground zero mosque." In late 2010, a debate over the location of the community center, now called the Cordoba House, became a contentious issue during the midterm elections.

During the debate, Rauf was called a "radical Muslim" and a "militant Islamist" by critics of the proposed community center. He was accused of sympathizing with the Sept. 11 hijackers and having connections to Hamas.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:54 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Shopping Bags Can Also Carry Stomach Flu Virus

An electron micrograph of human norovirus.
Charles D. Humphrey CDC Public Health Image Library ID 10708

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 9:48 am

Think you're safe from norovirus, the nasty bug behind the stomach flu, if you steer clear of someone who has it?

Think again. Researchers in Oregon investigating an outbreak of stomach flu among some young soccer players learned the virus can hitch a ride on those reusable plastic bags many of us have gotten accustomed to carrying to and from the store.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Wed May 9, 2012

French Artist's Painting Sells for $36 Million

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:48 am

Yves Klein made his project "FC1" with water, a blowtorch and two models. The women pressed their wet figures against a fire-resistant board, then stepped away. Afterward, Klein torched the board — an effect that left behind blurry silhouettes of models.

Politics
4:22 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Lugar's 36-Year Senate Career Ends With Primary Loss

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 4:35 am

Republican Senator Dick Lugar of Indiana has lost his bid for re-election. In Tuesday's primary, he was defeated by Tea Party challenger Richard Mourdock.

Politics
4:22 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Milwaukee Mayor To Face Gov. Walker In Recall Election

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 4:42 am

Voters in Wisconsin Tuesday, chose the Democrat who will face Republican Governor Scott Walker in next month's gubernatorial recall election. The winning Democrat was Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett.

Politics
4:22 am
Wed May 9, 2012

N.C. Voters Pass Gay Marriage Ban

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 4:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

North Carolina has become the 30th state to approve a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. State law already prohibits same-sex marriage, but supporters of this amendment say they wanted extra protection. Jessica Jones reports from North Carolina Public Radio.

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Business
4:22 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Pink Slime Maker To Close Plants, 650 To Lose Jobs

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 5:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. Two words - pink slime - have been powerful enough to cost the jobs of 650 meat-processing workers.

Iowa Public Radio's Pat Blank reports on the backlash against a ground-beef filler.

PAT BLANK, BYLINE: Officials with Beef Products Incorporated, or BPI, will permanently close three production plants in Waterloo, Iowa; Amarillo, Texas; and Garden City, Kansas; by the end of the month.

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Business
4:22 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Iowa Community Preserves Short Line Rail Track

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 5:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's stay in Iowa. It was only a few decades ago that railroad tracks laced the state's countryside, linking even the smallest Iowa communities to the rest of the country. Many of these short line railroads have been disappearing. They're being turned into farm land or in some cases, bicycle trails. But in one Iowa community, farmers and businessmen are using their own money to preserve their railroad connection. They see it as an economic lifeline.

Iowa Public Radio's Dean Borg reports.

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Health
4:22 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Should You Buy A Long-Term-Care Insurance Policy?

Kimberly Lankford is a writer for Kipplinger's Retirement Report.
Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 12:14 pm

Kimberly Lankford, personal finance writer for Kiplinger.com and Kiplinger's Personal Finance magazine, talks to David Greene about the shifting market for long-term-care insurance, and if it is still worth buying.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Law
3:37 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Fla. Court To Rule: Can A Lawyer Be Undocumented?

Jose Godinez-Samperio, an undocumented immigrant, passed the Florida bar exam in 2011. Now, the bar says it will admit him only with approval from the state Supreme Court.
Kathleen Flynn

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 4:22 am

It sounds like a typical American success story: A young boy becomes an academic standout, an Eagle Scout and high school valedictorian. Later, he attends college and then law school, all on full scholarships.

But Jose Godinez-Samperio's story is not typical. He's an undocumented immigrant from Mexico — and now he's fighting to be admitted to the Florida bar.

Godinez-Samperio was just 9 years old when he came to the U.S. with his parents. They entered the country legally, but overstayed their visas and settled in the Tampa area.

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Remembrances
5:36 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Roman Totenberg's Remarkable Life And Death

Totenberg teaches student Letitia Hom in his classroom at Boston University. Totenberg made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11.
David L. Ryan The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 1:20 pm

My father, world-renowned virtuoso violinist and teacher Roman Totenberg, whose professional career spanned nine decades and four continents, died early Tuesday morning at the age of 101.

His death was as remarkable as his life. He made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11, performed his last concert when he was in his mid-90s, and was still teaching, literally, on his deathbed. This week, as word flew around the musical world that he was in renal failure, former students flocked to his home in Newton, Mass., to see the beloved "maestro."

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Politics
4:32 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

High-Profile Primaries In Three States On Tuesday

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now, to politics here in the U.S. Today, Indiana voters are deciding the fate of long time Senator Dick Lugar in a Republican primary. Wisconsin is choosing a Democratic opponent to run against Republican Governor Scott Walker. And North Carolina is considering whether to add a ban on gay marriage to the state constitution.

Joining us to review the prospect for today's votes is NPR's senior Washington editor, Ron Elving. Hey, Ron.

RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Melissa.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:00 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

These Health Law Bets Are No Figure Of Speech

How much would you wager on the constitutionality of the sweeping federal health law?
Images_of_Money Flickr

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:43 am

The stakes are high in the U.S. Supreme Court's consideration of the 2010 health law, as countless commentators have observed. In some circles, however, the gambling metaphor has been pushed to its logical conclusion.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:40 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

When Religious Rules And Women's Health Collide

Hospital rules can affect a woman's options for care.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 4:18 pm

When you go to the hospital these days, chances are good that it will be affiliated with a religious organization. And while that may might just mean the chaplain will be of a specific denomination or some foods will be off limits, there may also be rules about the kind of care allowed.

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Politics
11:39 am
Tue May 8, 2012

When The Political Becomes Very Personal

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:13 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we know that minorities have been hard hit by the effects of the recession in everything from employment to foreclosure rates. There's a new office within the agency that's been charged with looking out for consumers that's supposed to take a look at how financial practices affect minorities and women. We'll speak with the new head of that office in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Nebraska Man Changes His Name To 'Tyrannosaurus Rex'

Not the Nebraska Tyrannosaurus Rex.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

He made this decision before scientists told us that, back in the prehistoric day, dinosaur farts likely contributed to climate change:

Tyler Gold of York, Neb., is now officially named Tyrannosaurus Rex Joseph Gold, the local York News Times reports.

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Health Insurance
9:46 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Why Your Drug Copay Could Change

How much a medicine costs you could vary depending on the value your insurer assigns to treatment.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 12:00 pm

What if how much you paid for a drug was based on how much it might help you, instead of the sticker price?

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Co-Workers Rescue Man From Vat Of Acid

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 1:16 pm

While initial headlines that said a man jumped into a vat of acid to rescue a co-worker at at New Jersey construction site may have overstated what happened just a bit, there's still a dramatic tale to tell.

According to NorthJersey.com:

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The Salt
9:06 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Recipe For Safer Drinking Water? Add Sun, Salt And Lime

Pakistani boys collect water from a hand pump on the outskirts of Islamabad.
Anjum Naveed AP

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 11:37 am

Sun, salt and lime sounds like the beginnings of a cocktail recipe, but for some, it could mean cleaner, life-sustaining water.

In many developing countries, the only source of water is contaminated with viruses and bacteria. In fact, the United Nations estimates that 1 in 6 people don't have access to enough fresh drinking water.

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