National

It's All Politics
4:55 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

For Bloomberg, Guns (Like Big Sodas) Are A Health Issue

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks to the media outside the White House after meeting with Vice President Joe Biden on Wednesday to discuss the administration's proposals to reduce gun violence.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 5:17 pm

The victory of a pro-gun-control candidate in the Illinois Democratic primary race to replace Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. was also a political win for New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, whose superPAC backed the winner over a candidate it linked to the NRA.

But Robin Kelly's victory Tuesday was, for Bloomberg, more than just another achievement on the gun control front. It was one more win in Bloomberg's unique assault on what he views as the public health problems of our time.

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The Picture Show
4:05 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

A Photographer Remembers Wounded Knee, 40 Years Later

Vietnam veteran Sid Mills, a Yakima man, stands guard.
Owen Luck

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 12:33 pm

Forty years ago, a caravan of more than 50 cars full of demonstrators pulled into Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. That day marked the beginning of a 71-day occupation led by members of the Oglala Lakota tribe and followers of the American Indian Movement, attempting to address long-standing grievances — not only with the U.S. government but also with tribal leaders.

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The Salt
3:47 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Do Parents Really Know What Their Kids Are Eating?

Donta Jackson's snack of choice is a bag of Skittles.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:09 pm

After school and evening are "crunch time" for most families. It's the time when crucial decisions get made that affect kids' fitness and weight. And that includes snacking.

To get an idea of what parents thought their kids were doing during this time, NPR conducted a poll with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. Youth Radio's Chantell Williams talked about the findings with teens and their parents.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

The Changing Politics Of Health Care

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now it's a supersize edition of the Political Junkie. Ken Rudin, of course, is staying with us. John Kasich, Rick Scott, now, Chris Christie - three high-profile Republican governors and outspoken critics of Obamacare - have all decided to accept federal money to expand Medicaid coverage. The governor of New Jersey explained his reasoning yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Shots - Health News
1:59 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Scientists Sift For Clues On SARS-Like Virus

A new coronavirus looks a lot like its cousin SARS under the microscope, but it appears they're quite different when it comes to contagiousness.
NIAID/RML

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 4:40 pm

Ever since a previously unknown virus killed a Saudi Arabian man last summer, scientists from around the globe have been trying to figure it out.

On Wednesday, two of the researchers who helped identify the virus shared fresh details about recent cases, including some ideas about how people catch it.

The session was part of an annual research meeting on biodefense and emerging diseases put on by the American Society for Microbiology in Washington, D.C.

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Shots - Health News
12:05 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

When Sizing Up Childhood Obesity Risks, It Helps To Ask About Random Kids

A poll needs to ask about randomly selected children in households across the country to bring context to what's happening with kids like 7-year-old Henry Condes in Los Angeles.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 12:17 pm

To understand the challenges around childhood obesity in the U.S., you need to take a close look at the lives of children and the households in which their habits are formed.

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, where I'm a researcher, created a unique poll to do that.

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Race
12:03 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Students Vote To Drop 'Redskins'

Students at Cooperstown Central School recently voted to stop calling their sport teams the Redskins. In turn, an Indian tribe offered to pay for new team uniforms. Host Michel Martin talks about the gesture with Ray Halbritter, of the Oneida Nation.

Beauty Shop
12:03 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Do We Still Need A Women's Movement?

100 years ago, thousands of women marched on Washington D.C. to demand the right to vote. Host Michel Martin asks the Beauty Shop ladies about that moment in history, and where the women's rights movement stands today.

Politics
11:56 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Is There Really A 'Line' For Immigration?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, it's been 100 years since thousands of women marched on Washington to demand the right to vote. We are heading into the Beauty Shop - that's our diverse panel of women commentators - to look back at that moment in history and talk about where the women's movement stands today.

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Arts & Life
11:56 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Fashion For Pregnancy Bumps

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we want to talk about fashion, but a very specific type of fashion that's taken a big step forward in recent years. We're talking about maternity fashion. Pregnancy is a special time in most women's lives. But even the happiest moms used to dread those Peter Pan collars, those giant bows, and do I even need to mention, the T-shirts with the, you know, arrow pointing to the belly.

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Around the Nation
6:13 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Tax On Hampton's Wealthy Pays To Fix Public Beach

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There is a longstanding debate over whether the federal government should pay to rebuild eroded beaches. Some think it's a waste of taxpayer money and others liken it to maintaining the country's infrastructure. In the playground for the rich and famous - the Hamptons - some wealthy homeowners have skipped the debate entirely. Charles Lane of member station WSHU reports that they're shelling out $25 million to fix the public beach in front of their private homes.

(SOUNDBITE OF OCEAN)

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Economy
6:13 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Across-The-Board Cuts Make Sequester Uniquely Painful

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

When people talk about the deep federal budget cuts, that are scheduled to take effect on Friday, they often come back to the same phrase. It's popped up on our air dozens of times in the last few weeks.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Across-the-board spending cuts.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: An ax across-the-board.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #3: Across-the-board.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Across-the-board.

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Education
6:13 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Colleges Prepare For Automatic Federal Budget Cuts

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 7:37 am

Colleges and universities are bracing for steep spending reductions in student aid and research funding due to the looming sequestration process. Financial aid offices are scrambling to offset the drop. University researchers say they're already seeing delays in federal grant making.

Around the Nation
6:13 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Sequester Cuts Free Some Immigration Detainees

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency has released hundreds of immigration detainees ahead of Friday's sequester deadline. The decision was made to help bring down the agency's budget, in light of the automatic spending cuts. ICE officials are getting both praise and a lot of heat for the unusual move. NPR's Ted Robbins has the story.

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Around the Nation
6:13 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Ex-State Rep. Likely To Replace Jesse Jackson, Jr.

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 10:34 am

Former Illinois legislator Robin Kelly has captured the Democratic nomination in the race to replace disgraced former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. She is all but assured a win in April's general election because the Chicago-area district is overwhelmingly Democratic.

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