National

Around the Nation
7:07 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Birds Of Different Feathers Flock Together

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A rooster, a mallard, and a white duck walked into a pond and into a beautiful friendship. A white duck with a limp, a rooster nicknamed Cocky and a mallard have settled down together at a pond on the grounds of a retirement community in White Rock, South Carolina. The State newspaper reports the trio has captured the imagination of residents there, who can't get enough of the birds of different feathers flocking together. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:03 am
Thu February 21, 2013

New Jersey Man Breaks Arcade Record

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
5:43 am
Thu February 21, 2013

New York Times Co. To Sell 'Boston Globe'

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 6:30 am

The company said it wanted to focus on The New York Times — its flagship newspaper. The Times bought the Globe for a record $1.1 billion in 1993.

Business
5:43 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Follow Report on H-1B Visa Story

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 6:28 am

Two days ago, Morning Edition aired a story about the H-1B program which grants temporary work visas to foreigners with special skills like computer programming. In the story, it was reported that employers have to show they tried to recruit Americans first. But as it turns out, many companies bypass American applicants.

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Fla. Gov. Scott Reverses Medicaid Decision

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 6:49 am

Florida Governor Rick Scott announced late Wednesday that he will expand Medicaid to an estimated 900,000 residents. The move is a surprise because the governor has previously been a vocal critic of President Obama's health care overhaul.

All Tech Considered
5:14 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Amid Lawsuits, Aereo Brings Broadcast TV To The Internet

Aereo allows users to connect to a distant antenna — a tiny device that acts like an old set of rabbit ears — and watch broadcast TV channels on their computer, tablet or smartphone. Currently the service is available only in New York City, and it's embroiled in legal complications.
Source images from iStockphoto.com, composite by Camila Domonoske

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:52 am

An antenna or a provider: For nearly all Americans, those are the only two ways to access live network TV. Anyone within range of a transmitter can hook up rabbit ears to tune in to ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, and other broadcasters, while cable or satellite subscribers get local channels through their subscription.

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Planet Money
3:05 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Three Ways To Totally Transform U.S. Immigration Policy

Immigrants wait for their citizenship interviews at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on Jan. 29.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 10:42 am

With immigration policy in the news again, I asked three economists, "Dream big: If you could create any immigration policy for the U.S., what would it be?" Here's what they said.

1. The Best And The Brightest

Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research would give out more visas to highly skilled workers: scientists, engineers, computer programmers and doctors.

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It's All Politics
3:02 am
Thu February 21, 2013

One Place You May Notice The Sequester: At The Airport

A passenger jet flies past the FAA control tower at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport in 2011.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:52 am

Unless Congress acts, across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take effect March 1 will be felt throughout the government. Some of the most visible effects will be noticed by air travelers.

Officials predict that cutbacks at the Federal Aviation Administration could lead to takeoff delays and fewer flights overall.

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Shots - Health News
6:33 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

In Reversal, Florida Gov. Scott Agrees To Medicaid Expansion

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, long a foe of the administration's health overhaul, reversed course and agree to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid in the state.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 7:25 am

Perhaps Florida Gov. Rick Scott's motto should be "never say never."

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U.S.
6:11 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Georgia Death Penalty Under Renewed Scrutiny After 11th-Hour Stay

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 7:05 pm

A Georgia inmate's execution was halted Tuesday night with less than an hour to go. Prison officials had already given Warren Lee Hill one of the drugs when a federal appeals court stepped in.

Hill has an IQ of 70 and his attorneys have long claimed that he's mentally impaired. His case is now raising questions about Georgia's law, which makes it difficult for defendants to prove they should be exempt from execution.

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The Salt
5:15 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Smaller But Better? Organic Tomatoes May Pack More Nutritional Punch

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 2:05 pm

A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE finds that tomatoes grown on organic farms were about 40 percent smaller than conventionally grown tomatoes. The upside? They pack more of a nutritional punch. The researchers found the organic tomatoes had significantly higher levels of vitamin C, sugar and lycopene.

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Shots - Health News
5:12 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Arizona Seeks To Balance Patients And Profits With Home Care

Luz Sepada, 59, lives in South Tucson, Ariz. Before the University of Arizona Health Plan assumed control of her medical care, Sepada was hospitalized 10 times in one year. After she was assigned a UAHP case manager, Sepada has been able to stay at home with no trips to the emergency department.
Sarah Varney KHN

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:11 pm

Can for-profit health insurance companies be trusted to take care of the nation's sickest and most expensive patients?

Many states, under an initiative supported by the Obama administration, are planning to let the companies manage health care for those elderly and disabled people covered by both Medicare and Medicaid.

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Monkey See
5:12 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Home Video Review: 'On The Waterfront'

As dockworker Terry Malloy in Elia Kazan's On the Waterfront, a young Marlon Brando firmly established himself as a leading Hollywood icon.
Criterion Collection

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:11 pm

Time again for a home-viewing recommendation from NPR movie critic Bob Mondello. Today, Bob suggests a tale of moral crisis — On the Waterfront, in a freshly restored Blu-ray version from Criterion.

Mugs and palookas, racketeers and dockworkers, mob boss Lee J. Cobb running the union with an iron fist, Marlon Brando tripping up its control when Eva Marie Saint urges him to go to the feds and rat out the rats.

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Shots - Health News
4:06 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Feds Outline What Insurers Must Cover, Down To Polyp Removal

Colonoscopy copay? Zero.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 9:41 am

The Obama administration on Wednesday released its final rule on essential health benefits, which sets out the coverage insurers must offer starting in 2014.

Insurers must cover 10 broad categories of care, including emergency services, maternity care, hospital and doctors' services, mental health and substance abuse care and prescription drugs.

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Sports
3:39 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

NASCAR Champ Finds Fans With Beer, Tweets And Bangin' Fenders

Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, gets out of his car after qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona on Feb. 17.
Jonathan Ferrey Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:11 pm

The first big race of the NASCAR season is on Sunday, and Brad Keselowski, the sport's brash, young champion, will begin defending his title.

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