National

The Salt
12:52 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Diet And Acne: For A Clearer Complexion, Cut The Empty Carbs

For better skin, maybe you should stick to the whole grain bagels.
istockphoto.com

If you're prone to outbreaks of acne, you may want to try cutting back on empty carbs and sweets. Researchers are revisiting the connections between diet and pimples, and a growing body of evidence suggests that eating a diet rich in high glycemic index foods may be tied to flare-ups.

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Shots - Health News
12:28 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Overdose Deaths From Narcotics Keep Climbing

Hydrocodone pills, the generic version of Vicodin, shown at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:12 pm

For the 11th year running, deaths from drug overdoses rose in the U.S in 2010.

Pharmaceuticals were involved in more than half of the 38,329 overdose deaths that year.

Opioid painkillers, such as hydrocodone, or Vicodin, were the most common prescription drugs implicated. They were cited in 16,651 fatalities, or 44 percent of the total.

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Politics
12:03 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Same Old Standoff In Washington?

President Obama wants Congress to act fast to avoid massive government budget cuts that could hit in March. Washington is seeing more gridlock as Republicans blocked a vote to confirm Chuck Hagel as Secretary of Defense. Host Michel Martin talks about the latest in politics.

Pop Culture
12:03 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Should Lena Dunham Be Playing Ping Pong Naked?

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:57 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Aristotle and Dante are the names of two important philosophers from history, but they're also the names of the principle characters in an award-winning new young adult novel about two Mexican-American boys and their journey of self-discovery. We'll hear from the author of "Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe." That is just ahead.

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The Salt
10:18 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Calorie Counts: Fatally Flawed, Or Our Best Defense Against Pudge?

Could it all be wrong? Some scientists say calorie counts are too inaccurate to be trusted.
Ed Ou AP

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Guilty Plea From Jesse Jackson Jr. Over 'Lavish' Spending

Former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., as he entered court in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 4:51 pm

  • NPR's David Schaper reporting

We most recently updated the top of this post at 2:50 p.m. ET.

Saying that "I've never been more clear in my life" about what he was doing, a tearful Jesse Jackson Jr. on Wednesday pleaded guilty to using about $750,000 in campaign funds collected for his congressional races to buy himself presents that included a Rolex watch worth more than $43,000.

The former congressman, a Democrat from Chicago, appeared in a Washington, D.C., courtroom. When he's sentenced in June, he could get a prison term of nearly five years.

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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Wed February 20, 2013

'It Felt Like An Earthquake': One Still Missing After Kansas City Explosion

Fire fighters and utility workers at the scene of a massive gas explosion and fire Tuesday night in Kansas City, Mo.
Orlin Wagner AP

"It sounded like thunder, but it felt like an earthquake," Tracey Truitt, a lawyer who was working in a nearby building, tells the Kansas City Star about an explosion Tuesday evening that leveled a restaurant in the city's Country Club Plaza.

At least 16 people were injured and as of early this morning one person remained missing, the Star says.

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Politics
6:57 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Automatic Spending Cut Would Cause 'Hardship' For People

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 4:39 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Business
6:55 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Boeing's Tech Workers Vote To Authorize Strike

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Boeing has won a partial victory in a contract dispute with its engineering union, and that reduces the odds of a strike, as Ashley Gross of member station KPLU in Seattle reports.

ASHLEY GROSS, BYLINE: The engineering union covers two sets of workers - salaried engineers and hourly technical workers. The engineers voted to accept Boeing's final offer. The technical workers rejected it and authorized a strike.

They'll negotiate again before a walkout, but that split vote puts union leaders like Tom McCarty in a tough position.

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Business
6:53 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Law Change Makes It Harder To Unlock Cellphones

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Maybe you don't like your mobile phone carrier, but you like your phone and you want to keep it but change providers. An obscure change in federal law makes it illegal to switch without permission from your carrier.

If you have, for example, AT&T, in order to switch to T-Mobile you have to unlock the phone, and AT&T can now stop you from doing that.

The change in the copyright law has some people upset, and they're petitioning the White House for a fix.

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Health
6:30 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Being Obese Can Weigh On Employees' Insurance

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As Yuki just reported, employers are looking very closely at using carrots and sticks to get workers to change their unhealthy ways. Let's learn more now about that provision in the health care law which allows employers to put in place wellness programs aimed at improving health and managing health care costs. Morgan Downey is an advocate for people with obesity. He's also the editor of the Downey Obesity Report.

Thanks for joining us.

MORGAN DOWNEY: Not at all. It's my pleasure.

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NPR Story
6:07 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Civil Penalties At Stake In BP's Trial

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. BP faces trial next week in a civil lawsuit to fix blame for the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history. It's the 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico.

MONTAGNE: Eleven rig workers were killed and nearly five million barrels of oil spilled. Some of the oil drifted onto beaches and wetlands from Florida to Texas.

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NPR Story
6:07 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Where Does Overhauling Immigration Stand?

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Bipartisan groups and lawmakers are working together on another issue: Immigration. Yesterday, the president spoke with several senators involved in negotiations on that issue. But, at the same time, some senators criticized the White House for drafting its own plan for changing immigration laws.

We're going to talk through this subject with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. She's on the line.

Mara, good morning.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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Working Late: Older Americans On The Job
3:08 am
Wed February 20, 2013

When A Bad Economy Means Working 'Forever'

The recession put a dent in Sims-Wood's savings, and she expects she'll have to stay in the workforce "forever."
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 8:34 pm

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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All Tech Considered
3:04 am
Wed February 20, 2013

In New York, Taxi Apps Raise Objections From Competitors

New York City rules will soon permit yellow cab drivers to accept rides through smartphone apps.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:56 am

Even people who've never been to New York can tell you how to hail one of the iconic yellow cabs there. You just raise an arm and flag one down.

But the city wants to change that. Following the lead of cities like San Francisco and Washington, D.C., New York wants to permit passengers to use smartphone apps to find a cab.

Since Mayor La Guardia established New York's modern taxi system in 1937, there have been two big innovations in cab hailing: the whistle and the red light bulb on top of apartment building awnings.

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