National

Business
3:21 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Car Dealers Sue Tesla, Citing State Franchise Laws

A Tesla Motors showroom in San Jose, Calif. Car dealers in New York and Massachusetts have filed a lawsuit that seeks to block Tesla from selling its vehicles in those states.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:46 pm

Tesla Motors usually makes headlines for its technology. Its new Model S is the first entirely electric vehicle to be named car of the year by Automobile Magazine.

Friday's news is less flattering: A judge in New York will take up a lawsuit against the company about how Tesla sells its cars.

When Mark Seeger bought a Tesla in Seattle, he was actually just looking for a pair of shoes.

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StoryCorps
3:20 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Vet Recalls The 'Legacy Of War That Lasts Forever'

Harvey Hilbert was shot in the head in Vietnam in 1966 in a firefight where he mistakenly shot and killed a fellow soldier. "You know, I'm 65 years old, and I can remember clearly that young man — the color of his skin, his face, his cries," Hilbert told StoryCorps.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:46 pm

Harvey Hilbert enlisted in the Army in 1964. He was in the infantry, and in January 1966, he was sent to Vietnam to fight. Five months later, his unit was sent into the jungle. That was the last time he fought in Vietnam.

"It was coming on dusk, and we went into what's called a hot landing zone — means we were under fire," Hilbert told StoryCorps. "We jumped off the helicopters and took a position. And then the enemy stopped shooting."

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Shots - Health News
3:19 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Disappoints, But Work Continues

A mother dresses her baby after doctors examined him during the malaria vaccine trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya in October 2009.
Karel Prinsloo AP

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:59 pm

The public health world has waited for the results for more than a year. After a half-billion dollars in R&D, would the front-runner malaria vaccine protect the top-priority targets: young infants?

The results are disappointing. The vaccine — called RTS,S for its various molecular components — reduced infants' risk of malaria by about a third.

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Shots - Health News
3:18 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Stakes Rise In Malaria Battle As Cracks Appear In Drug's Armor

This 5-year-old boy was carried to a Thai malaria clinic by his mother from deep inside Myanmar. If the mother had waited even a day longer, doctors say, the child probably would have died.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:25 pm

Malaria remains a huge problem in much of the world, but over the past decade the number of people getting sick and dying from the disease has gone down dramatically.

Health workers attribute much of this progress to the widespread use of artemisinin-based drugs. The problem now is that resistance to these drugs is starting to develop in Southeast Asia.

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It's All Politics
3:18 am
Fri November 9, 2012

'Let Mitt Be Mitt': But Who Was He?

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney arrives onstage early Wednesday morning in Boston, moments before conceding defeat in the 2012 presidential election.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 10:30 pm

The postmortems for Republican Mitt Romney's presidential campaign are rolling in.

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Shots - Health News
5:33 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Why Energy Drinks May Not Be The Answer For Sleepy Soldiers

U.S. Army Pvt. Freymond Tyler sleeps on a laptop next to his gun at combat outpost Makuan in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, in 2011.
Romeo Gacad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 11:12 am

The promise of a quick boost has made caffeine-rich energy drinks all the rage among soldiers in combat zones.

The troops endure long hours under difficult conditions. But those convenient pick-me-ups could come with a steep price: difficulty sleeping.

Soldiers in Afghanistan who consumed three or more energy drinks daily were more likely to sleep fewer hours and have their sleep disrupted because of stress or illness, researchers found.

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It's All Politics
5:20 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Likely Suspects: Guessing Obama's Second-Term Cabinet

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick introduces President Obama at a Democratic National Committee fundraiser last year. Could Patrick be chosen to replace Eric Holder as attorney general?
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 6:18 pm

Every second-term president has to rebuild some or all of his Cabinet as high-profile members often time their resignations with the end of the president's first term. President Obama already is expected to receive a number of resignations, which he will have to fill.

With the guessing game under way, here's a look at some of the people who may emerge from a second-term Cabinet shakeup:

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It's All Politics
4:37 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

For Religious Conservatives, Election Was A 'Disaster'

Attendees pray during The Family Research Council's Values Voter Summit on Sept. 14 in Washington, D.C.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:13 pm

Many religious conservatives thought this might be the year of an evangelical comeback, when voters would throw President Obama out because of his support of same-sex marriage and abortion, and his health plan's birth control mandate. It didn't work out that way.

"I think this was an evangelical disaster," says Albert Mohler, president of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky.

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World
4:32 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Elated Kenyans Revel In Obama Win

Kenyans dance at a watch party for the U.S. presidential election in Kogelo village, home to President Obama's step-grandmother. Kenyans were elated by the president's re-election.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:02 pm

As the news spread that the son of the late Barack Obama Sr. — a Kenyan government economist — had held on to the most powerful presidency in the world, the elation across this East African nation was contagious.

One Nairobi radio DJ could scarcely contain himself on Wednesday. "How are your feelings this morning, this Obama Day morning? Talk to me and share your feelings with me," he said.

High Hopes For A Long-Expected Visit

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It's All Politics
4:25 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Florida's Most Populous County Finishes Vote Count

A Miami-Dade Elections Department employee tallies absentee ballot reports in Doral, Fla., on Thursday.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:53 pm

It only took two extra days, but Florida's Miami-Dade County has finished counting votes in the presidential election.

Supervisor of Elections Penelope Townsley said Thursday she was pleased to announce that the state's most populous county, with more than 2.5 million people, was "the first of the large counties to complete its tabulation process."

Townsley was referring to three other large counties — Broward (population 1.8 million), Palm Beach (population 1.3 million) and Duval (population 870,000) — that were still tallying absentee ballots.

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Around the Nation
4:24 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Nor'Easter Deals Extra Blow To Those Without Power

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:02 pm

A California power crew took on one damaged street on Long Island.

Around the Nation
4:24 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Power Crews Back To Square One In New Jersey

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:02 pm

Melissa Block talks to Ron Morano, chief spokesman for Jersey Central Power and Light, about continued power outages after Sandy and Wednesday's Nor'easter.

Politics
4:19 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

'Fiscal Cliff' Will Change Terms Of Debate In Congress

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The political landscape of Washington, after more than a year of campaigning and billions of dollars in political spending, is stunningly unchanged. President Obama is in the White House. Republicans control the House of Representatives. Democrats hold the Senate.

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NPR Story
4:07 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Pot Legalization Could Cut Deeply Into Cartel Profits

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As Barb mentioned, this week, Colorado and Washington State passed measures legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. We're going to hear reaction now from the country where much of America's pot is grown, Mexico. The sale, growth, and use of marijuana there remains illegal. And Mexico's incoming government fears these new laws will force them to rethink how they fight cross-border pot smuggling. But others think the measures could help fight narco-trafficking and cut into the cartels' power.

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Shots - Health News
4:02 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Health-Minded Smartphone Users Have In Common With Obama Voters

Elizabeth Ball checks her phone while waiting to vote Monday in Bowling Green, Ohio.
J.D. Pooley AP

Maybe I've got too many election results on my brain.

But the Pew Research Center's report about how people are using their mobile phones to get health information sent me to the data from the exit polls. Really.

Why?

The bottom line of the Pew report is that cellphone "owners who are Latino, African American, between the ages of 18-49, or hold a college degree are also more likely to gather health information" than other people on their mobile phones.

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