National

Books
10:03 am
Wed February 13, 2013

'Dry Bones'? Hardly — There's Still Life In Detroit

An image from "Detroit Disassembled," an exhibit on display at the National Building Museum. (Andrew Moore, The Aurora, Brush Park neighborhood, 2008)
Andrew Moore National Building Museum

"Girdles and red nail polish and intestinal cleansing and bar fights and sewer pipes and wiretaps and eternal life and decay all around. It was insanity. It was outrageous. It was a reporter's wet dream. Where the hell was I?

"I paid the bill and left.

"The sign outside said DETROIT CITY LIMITS."

The corrupt, crime-addled Detroit of Charlie LeDuff's new memoir, Detroit: An American Autopsy, isn't the same city that I left a month ago.

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Around the Nation
7:58 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Sen. Rubio Parched By State Of The Union Response

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Republican Senator Marco Rubio delivered the Republican reply to the State of the Union. In mid-critique, Rubio wanted water but water was out of reach. The senator ducked down, reached off screen, found it, sipped it and resumed. But the Twittersphere had left the building. Water tweets flooded the nation. Rubio tweeted too - a picture of his water bottle. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
7:42 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Single Gunshot Reportedly Ends Dramatic California Manhunt

Police blocked roads Tuesday leading to the mountains near San Bernardino, Calif., where accused killer Christopher Dorner was thought to be hiding.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 2:47 pm

  • NPR's Kirk Siegler, reporting for the NPR Newscast

We most recently updated the top of this post at 1:25 p.m. ET.

While authorities have canceled the "tactical alert" that had been in place during the manhunt for accused killer Christopher Jordan Dorner, the case has not been closed because it's not absolutely certain that Dorner is dead, a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman just told reporters.

So, Los Angeles police officers and their families who have been under protection while Dorner was on the run will continue to get that protection until his death has been confirmed.

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Around the Nation
7:32 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Sewage Plant Offers Valentine's Day Tour

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

In New York, it's hard to get a dinner reservation to a trendy restaurant on Valentine's Day. And apparently, for hipsters in Brooklyn's Greenpoint neighborhood, it can be tough to get a spot on a romantic tour of a sewage treatment plant. New York's Department of Environmental Protection says this Valentine's Day, it had to add an extra tour because of the demand. Why the sewage plant tour is so trendy? Hmm, maybe the pheromones.

Politics
6:31 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Obama Calls For Strengthening The Middle Class

The White House seemed surprised last month when President Obama's inaugural address was characterized in some quarters as a liberal manifesto. So Tuesday night's State of the Union speech was firmly grounded in the bread-and-butter pocketbook issues facing the middle class.

Around the Nation
6:24 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Airlines Take To Bundling Frills

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:53 am

Airlines have found another way to make money on top of the base ticket price. Linda Wertheimer talks to Scott McCartney, the airline columnist for The Wall Street Journal, about a new trend in the airline industry.

Around the Nation
6:24 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Manhunt For Fired-LAPD Officer Appears Over

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:49 am

In Southern California, the week-long manhunt for Christopher Dorner appears to be over. He is the former LAPD officer who is believed to be responsible for four murders.

Politics
6:24 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Lawmakers React To State Of The Union Address

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And also watching the president's address last night was NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith. She was in the chamber and spoke to members of Congress afterwards.

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Animals
6:24 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Affenpinscher Is Westminster's Top Dog

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It is a scruffy, little black pooch named Banana Joe that is now America's new top dog. Joe, an Affenpinscher, won Best in Show last night in New York at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

Josh Dean is author of the book "Show Dog." And he joined us to talk about the results. Good morning.

JOSH DEAN: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: So, a lot of people may not know what an Affenpinscher actually is.

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: Why don't you describe the breed for us?

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Working Late: Older Americans On The Job
3:50 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Series Overview: More Americans Working Past Retirement Age

John David, 73, chats with one of his students after his exercise class at the 92nd St Y in New York.
Shiho Fukada for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 8:58 am

The top financial worry of Americans is that they won't have enough money when they retire, according to a recent Gallup poll. And the average age at which Americans expect to retire keeps rising — from age 60 in the mid-1990s to age 67 now, the survey showed.

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Working Late: Older Americans On The Job
3:43 am
Wed February 13, 2013

For One Senior, Working Past Retirement Age Is A Workout

John David, 73, teaches fitness classes to help older people stay healthy and fit. Here he teaches an hourlong class at the 92nd Street Y in New York City.
Shiho Fukada for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 8:29 pm

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

Retirement isn't what it used to be, or even when it used to be.

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Politics
5:28 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Obama To Focus On Job Creation, Economic Growth In State Of The Union

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And we turn now to the big political news of the day. In a matter of hours President Obama will deliver his State of the Union address to Congress, the first of his second term. Tens of millions of Americans will be watching as the president lays out his agenda and picks up where he left off in his inaugural address last month. He's expected to focus on job creation and talk about how leveling the playing field to give everyone a fair shot will help the economy grow.

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Around the Nation
5:28 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

New York City Ends 30 Year Experiment With 'Don't Honk' Signs

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's evident to anyone who's visited New York City that it is a loud place to live. Also, that much of the noise is caused by frustrated drivers.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR HORNS)

SIEGEL: Well, when it comes to honking, New York is making a U-turn. City officials are removing hundreds of don't honk signs from the streets. They say there is no evidence the signs are working. But as NPR's Joel Rose reports, others say New York is admitting defeat in the war on noise.

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Around the Nation
5:28 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Fugitive Ex-LAPD Cop Reportedly Exchanges Gunfire With Officers Near Big Bear

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

And we begin this hour with a terrifying scene in the mountains of Southern California. A fugitive, the former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner, is apparently involved in a gun battle with law enforcement officers. Details are still sketchy, but NPR's Kirk Siegler joins us from NPR West to talk more about this. And, Kirk, start by telling us the latest.

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Shots - Health News
4:31 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Folic Acid For Pregnant Mothers Cuts Kids' Autism Risk

Despite public health campaigns urging women in the U.S. to take folic acid, many are still not taking the supplements when they become pregnant.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 1:19 pm

A common vitamin supplement appears to dramatically reduce a woman's risk of having a child with autism.

A study of more than 85,000 women in Norway found that those who started taking folic acid before getting pregnant were about 40 percent less likely to have a child who developed the disorder, researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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