National

Law
4:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Court To Weigh In On Concealed Weapons In Md.

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 7:18 am

A federal appeals court is considering a challenge to Maryland's handgun permit laws in the case of a man who sued after being denied a concealed carrry permit. At issue is whether Maryland can require people to prove a "good and substantial reason" to exercise a constitutional right.

Shots - Health News
3:23 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Flu Wave Stresses Out Hospitals

Physician assistants Scott Fillman (left) and Andrew Hunadi get ready to see patients with flu symptoms, in a tent erected just outside the emergency entrance at the Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 3:32 pm

What does it feel like to be working in an emergency room during this nasty flu season? Monday. Every day feels like Monday, typically the busiest time of week in the ER.

"Now instead of having a Monday peak, it's seven days a week of a Monday," said Dr. Bill Frohna, who runs the emergency department at MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C.

It's still too soon to say whether this is a historically bad flu season. But it's already clear that emergency rooms around the country are filled with a feverish throng that is much larger than the last time around.

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World
3:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Training Program Aims To Prep Soldiers For Civilian Jobs

Minnesota National Guard Capt. Jeff Pratt, who has nearly 20 years of military service under his belt, found a civilian job with the help of a new jobs program led by the Minnesota National Guard.
Jennifer Simonson for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 10:11 am

Thousands of Minnesota soldiers deployed in Kuwait woke up to a surprise last spring. Just weeks before the end of their tour, a group of corporate recruiters in business-casual attire showed up on base. The first-of-its kind visit was part of a new strategy to help returning service members find civilian jobs before their feet even hit U.S. soil.

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Losing Our Religion
3:21 am
Tue January 15, 2013

More Young People Are Moving Away From Religion, But Why?

(From left) Yusuf Ahmad, Kyle Simpson, and Melissa Adelman also participated in the discussion about religion with NPR's David Greene at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Washington, D.C.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 6:24 pm

One-fifth of Americans are religiously unaffiliated — higher than at any time in recent U.S. history — and those younger than 30 especially seem to be drifting from organized religion. A third of young Americans say they don't belong to any religion.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

U.S. Military's Suicide Rate Surpassed Combat Deaths In 2012

U.S. military suicides rose in 2012. Here, the Army's "Generating Health and Discipline in the Force" report, right, is seen last January. The reports was a follow-up to its "Health Promotion/Risk Reduction/Suicide Prevention" report.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 6:47 am

The number of suicide deaths in the U.S. military surged to a record 349 last year — more than the 295 Americans who died fighting in Afghanistan in 2012. The numbers were first reported by the AP; NPR has confirmed them.

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'Radio Diaries'
5:43 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten

During his inaugural address on Jan. 14, 1963, newly elected Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace vowed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever."
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 8:17 pm

It was just a single line in a speech given 50 years ago today. But that one phrase, "segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever," is remembered as one of the most vehement rallying cries against racial equality in American history.

The year was 1963. Civil rights activists were fighting for equal access to schools and the voting booth, and the federal government was preparing to intervene in many Southern states.

And on Jan. 14, in Montgomery, Ala., newly elected Gov. George Wallace, a Democrat, stepped up to a podium to deliver his inaugural address.

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Energy
5:40 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Five Years Into Fracking Boom, One Pa. Town At A Turning Point

The natural gas fracking boom has sped up life in Towanda, Pa. There are positives and negatives to that fact — Towanda's unemployment rate stayed low throughout the recession, but its crime rate jumped, too. And now that natural gas prices have slowed down drilling, Towanda is wondering whether its boom is already turning into a bust.

Shots - Health News
5:29 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

How Long Does It Take To Shake A Cough?

A health poster from World War II carries a message that still rings true.
National Archives

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 5:15 pm

Antibiotics only work against bacteria, but many people get the drugs to treat viral infections, too.

More than half of people coughing and wheezing from acute bronchitis are treated with antibiotics, even though less than 10 percent of the cases involve bacterial infections.

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Around the Nation
5:21 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Homeless Seek Shelter, Crops Suffer Amid Southwest Cold Snap

James Truman inspects a grapefruit tree for frost damage on his 21-acre citrus farm northwest of Phoenix.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 6:33 pm

Cold has descended on an area of the country that is known for its near-perfect weather this time of year.

For several nights in a row, subfreezing temperatures have sent homeless people in Arizona to warming centers, while farmers in Southern California are preparing for a possible crop freeze.

It's Cold Outside

Toni Eskeli tries to keep warm, wrapped in a scarf and a peacoat near downtown Phoenix. She and her boyfriend huddle around a picnic table, rolling cigarettes, doing what they can to stay warm.

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Around the Nation
5:21 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Families Of Newtown Victims Launch New Initiative

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 9:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Family members of those killed at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut, have spent the past month grieving. Now, some of them have banded together and say they're ready to be part of a national discussion about how to make our communities safer. They call themselves the Sandy Hook Promise. Jeff Cohen, of member station WNPR, has the story.

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Around the Nation
5:21 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Demand High At San Francisco Firearms Show As Nation Mulls Gun Control

Concerns about new gun control measures has many weapons flying off the shelves. At one recent gun show in San Francisco, assault rifles were in short supply even though their prices had skyrocketed.

Health
5:07 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

47 States Report Widespread Influenza Outbreaks

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

The influenza virus is on a lot of minds today. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 47 states are reporting widespread outbreaks. The flu was even mentioned several times during last night's Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills. Here's comedian Amy Poehler joking about one star who stayed home.

AMY POEHLER: Meryl Streep is not here tonight. She has the flu. And I hear she's amazing in it.

(LAUGHTER)

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The Salt
5:04 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Women With A Berry-Snacking Habit May Have Healthier Hearts

Regular consumption of blueberries, such as these found at Butler's Orchard in Maryland, may prevent heart attacks in middle-aged women.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 10:08 am

When it comes to supernutritious foods, the blueberry has long had a health halo floating over it.

Going back to Colonial times when Native Americans and English settlers ground up blueberries and added them to porridge, in both dried and fresh forms, there have been hints of health-promoting effects.

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Politics
4:38 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Dear Mr. President: What Do You Want Obama To Remember?

Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 4:55 pm

President Obama will soon be sworn into office, and whether you voted for him or not, he's everybody's president. What do you want him to remember in his second term?

Share your thoughts at http://inauguration2013.tumblr.com/

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Couple Whose Bike Was Stolen, And Returned, Will Donate It

Courtney Forbes, 21, stands with the tandem bicycle that she and her husband, Harly relied on for transportation before it was stolen last week. They plan to donate the bike, which has since been returned, to the Washington School for the Blind.
Kimberlee Turner

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 6:47 am

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