National

TED Radio Hour
9:08 am
Fri July 18, 2014

What Does It Take To Dive Into Dangerous Waters?

"When I stand on that shore, the main thing is, I want that destination, I want it" — Diana Nyad
Marla Aufmuth TED

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 2:35 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Champions.

About Diana Nyad's TedTalk

In pitch-black, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, hallucinating, Diana Nyad kept swimming. She describes the journey of her historic 110-mile swim from Cuba to Florida, at age 64.

About Diana Nyad

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Monkey See
8:03 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: For Our 200th Episode, Quizzes And A Q&A

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

It seems like it's been about 200 weeks since we started hyping the 200th episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour, and it's finally here. This is the second hour of our June 24 live show in NPR's Studio 1, and it's got a bit of everything — but first, a few announcements.

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Police Chief Lessons Gave Kerlikowske Insight Into Protesters

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 11:38 am

New commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection Gil Kerlikowske talked to Steve Inskeep in his first extended interview on the use of force and controversial shootings by the Border Patrol.

Business
5:52 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Microsoft Announces Biggest Layoffs In Company's History

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 8:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's Business News starts with a downsized Microsoft. Microsoft announced the biggest layoffs in its history yesterday. It's cutting 18,000 jobs worldwide over the next year - that's 14% of its workforce. The company's new CEO wants to adapt to a society and an industry increasingly dependent on mobile devices. From member station KPLU, Bellamy Pailthorp reports.

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Around the Nation
5:49 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Reminder: Better Pay Your Trash Bill

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 8:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a reminder to pay your trash bill. This comes courtesy of a trash hauling company in Redwing Minnesota. The company is called Paul's Industrial Garage, P-I-G, PIG. A customer did not pay for trash hauling, so a company employee dumped almost two tons of garbage on his lawn. PIG has now been fined for dumping, quote, "wet putrescible waste."

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Putrescible?

Remembrances
5:41 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Broadway Legend Elaine Stritch Dies At 89

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 8:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Broadway has lost a legend. She's Elaine Stritch, who died yesterday at the age of 89. Even recently she was gaining new fans with a guest role on the TV series "30 Rock." But as we're about to hear, Stritch made her name on the stage. Jeff Lunden has this appreciation of a singular talent.

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Around the Nation
5:37 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Calif. Officials Debate How To Get Residents To Cut Water Use

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 8:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In California, residents are being urged to conserve water as the state suffers from a historic drought. But a new report says the state's water use has actually gone up over the last year. California enacted statewide water restrictions this week. Those include fines of up to $500 a day. Now, to find out what actually gets people to cut their water use, NPR's Sam Sanders hit the streets of L.A.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: Rick Silva has just pulled up on a violator.

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Politics
5:35 am
Fri July 18, 2014

While Campaigning For Other Democrats, Sen. Warren Gains Fans

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 10:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We report next on a woman who's become a focus of presidential speculation. Hillary Clinton, of course, is an overwhelming front-runner for the Democratic nomination, but Elizabeth Warren has excited a lot of Democratic activists. The Massachusetts senator is spending her summer traveling the country.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:03 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Border Agency Chief Opens Up About Deadly Force Cases

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner R. Gil Kerlikowske sits under an image of New York's Ground Zero in his office in Washington. For him, it serves as a daily reminder of the security threats that have shaped his agency.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 8:57 am

The new commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection says he is reviewing scores of incidents in which agents have used deadly force.

R. Gil Kerlikowske made that statement during an exclusive interview with NPR's Morning Edition. It was his first extended conversation about controversial incidents in which the Border Patrol has killed civilians without apparent accountability. (Click here for a full transcript of the interview.)

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Shots - Health News
3:36 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Head Scientist At CDC Weighs Costs Of Recent Lab Safety Breaches

The CDC's director, Tom Frieden, testified before a congressional subcommittee Wednesday regarding a recent anthrax incident and lab safety improvements he is instituting.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 10:40 am

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the hot seat.

It all started in mid-June, when the CDC announced that dozens of its scientists might have accidentally been exposed to anthrax.

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The Salt
5:48 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

QUIZ: Which Of These State Fair Foods Are Faux?

Deep-fried breakfast on-a-stick is a new food at this year's Minnesota State Fair. It contains American and Swiss cheeses, a sausage patty, one egg and Canadian bacon sandwiched between two pancakes, then dipped in a light, sweet batter and deep-fried on a stick.
Courtesy of Minnesota State Fair

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 7:54 pm

It is the season of state fairs, when you may have a chance to expand your palate or test your gag reflex at the concession stands. (Once you're stuffed, maybe you'll get to admire a butter sculpture.)

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Around the Nation
4:57 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Ring The Bells: A Carillon Campaign Is Going Nationwide

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 8:40 pm

Reporter Julie Rose unravels the unique art of the carillon. A carillonneur is someone who, at a wedding or funeral, hammers away on wooden pegs with their fists and hands to coax music from large bells. Brigham Young University has a particularly active carillon, with recitals every afternoon — often involving students who have only recently discovered the instrument.

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Men In America
4:53 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

The Face Of The Millennial Man, Sketched In Data

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 8:40 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. We've been hearing from men about what they think it means to be a man and what their lives are like.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

JOE EHRMANN: I recognize that I was a socialized male that had separated my heart from my head, trying to live life from the neck up.

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U.S.
4:53 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

As Immigration Crisis Grows, A Protest Movement Gains Steam

In Oracle, Ariz., on Tuesday, protesters gather near the entrance to a juvenile facility in an effort to stop the arrival of a busload of Central American immigrant children. The bus never arrived.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 11:01 pm

Anti-illegal immigration activists are planning several hundred protests in cities across the country on Friday and Saturday, part of a growing backlash against the federal government's efforts to temporarily house migrant children detained at the border.

Protesters say they are concerned about safety, as the Obama administration pushes to move detainees from Texas to shelters run by nonprofits in other states.

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Months From Water Crisis, Leaking W.Va. Tanks Are Demolished

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 8:40 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

At the beginning of the year, residents of Charleston, West Virginia smelled a licorice odor in their water. It turned out a chemical used in coal production had leaked out of a nearby storage tank, contaminating the water supply for 300,000 people. This week, tanks at the center of this crisis are being demolished. But as Dave Mistich of West Virginia Public Broadcasting reports, that doesn't necessarily bring closure.

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