National

Around the Nation
5:00 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

Disaster Donations Surge, But What About Tomorrow?

A member of the Red Cross distributes food to residents of Coney Island affected by Superstorm Sandy in the Brooklyn, N.Y., on Nov. 9.
John Minchillo AP

More than $174 million in donations has been raised for those affected in New York and New Jersey by Superstorm Sandy, which devastated parts of the Atlantic coast in late October.

"The more affluent and well-insured people will figure a way to recover their lives, but there are a lot of people in New York who really won't have that capacity and can't speak out for themselves," says Stacy Palmer, the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

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Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Awash With Love: Storm Resurfaces 1940s Letters

Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick found the storm-soaked stack of letters as they were walking along the New Jersey shore.
Lindsay Lazarski Newsworks.org

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 12:15 am

The weekend after Superstorm Sandy, Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick stumbled upon a bundle of letters while they were walking along the New Jersey shore near her home.

The letters were tied with a pink ribbon and thoroughly soaked. Some of the beautiful handwriting had blurred. Chaney took the bundle home, dried out the letters and began to read them.

They were written to a man named Lynn Farnham, signed by "your loving Dot." Chaney says the letters speak of true love and devotion.

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Around the Nation
12:03 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Some Oppose Plans To Raze Unique Chicago Edifice

The Prentice Women's Hospital in Chicago was named one of the 10 most endangered historic places in Illinois by the nonprofit group Landmarks Illinois.
Kiichiro Sato AP

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 1:00 pm

Walk through downtown Chicago and you experience modern architecture to its fullest. There's the Auditorium Building by Louis Sullivan, the Federal Center by Mies van der Rohe and Marina City by Bertrand Goldberg — two towers made even more famous after starring on an album cover by the Chicago band Wilco.

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U.S.
4:57 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

Legal Pot Is Here, But Stash The Wallet For Now

Legalized marijuana in Colorado and Washington state may open the door to a new kind of tourism.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Wed November 28, 2012 5:34 pm

On Election Day, voters in Colorado and Washington state legalized the use of marijuana for recreational use. What's next?

No, really, what happens now?

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National Security
4:13 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

Border Killings Prompt Scrutiny Over Use Of Force

Pedestrians cross the street in Nogales, Mexico, near the border with Arizona. A U.S. Border Patrol agent shot and killed a 16-year-old boy who was throwing rocks near the border fence last month.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 6:26 pm

The Department of Homeland Security is examining its policy on deadly force along the U.S.-Mexico border. In less than two years, U.S. Border Patrol agents have killed 18 Mexican citizens there — including eight people who were throwing rocks.

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Around the Nation
6:34 am
Sat November 24, 2012

Home Sweet (Tiny) Home: S.F. Plans To Downsize

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 10:30 am

This week the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a pilot program to build apartments as small as 220 square feet. The experimental ordinance is prompted by rocketing real estate values in the city.

Around the Nation
5:26 am
Sat November 24, 2012

Strumming The Pain, Songwriters Play Vets' Stories

Songwriter Jay Clementi works on a song with Sgt. 1st Class Scott McRae at the weekend retreat near Fort Hood in Central Texas.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for NPR

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 12:25 pm

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The Two-Way
12:28 am
Sat November 24, 2012

'Dallas' Villain Larry Hagman Dies At 81

Actor Larry Hagman, star of the TV series Dallas, poses during the 2010 Monte Carlo Television Festival in Monaco on June 8, 2010.
Christian Alminana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 24, 2012 2:22 pm

Larry Hagman, who played the villain J.R. Ewing on television's long-running, prime-time soap opera Dallas, has died. He was 81.

A source close to Hagman confirmed his passing to NPR but would not speak on the record at the request of the family.

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World
2:31 pm
Fri November 23, 2012

Russia, U.S. Seek To Resolve Friction On Adoptions

Artyom Savelyev, now 9, was sent back to Russia on a plane by his adoptive U.S. mother in 2010. The case stirred anger in Russia.
Misha Japaridze AP

Originally published on Fri November 23, 2012 7:29 pm

Americans have been adopting Russian children in sizable numbers for two decades, and most of the unions have worked out well. But it remains a sensitive topic in Russia, where officials periodically point to high-profile cases of abuse or other problems.

Now, the two countries are putting the finishing touches on a new agreement governing these adoptions. It will make the process costlier and more time-consuming, but it's designed to address a host of concerns.

Some Russian officials still seem to bristle at the very thought of foreigners adopting Russian children.

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It's All Politics
8:54 am
Fri November 23, 2012

How To Oust A Congressman, SuperPAC-Style

U.S. Rep. Joe Baca of California, shown at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, learned the power of superPACs firsthand this year, when he lost for the first time since he was elected in 1999.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri November 23, 2012 1:53 pm

After spending millions of dollars in the presidential and Senate campaigns with little to show for it, many superPACs and other outside groups are still tending their wounds. But it's too soon to write off superPACs as a waste of wealthy donors' money.

Consider, for instance, this upset in a congressional race outside Los Angeles.

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Monkey See
8:37 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Out Of Season Entertainment And A TV Quiz

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We know you're traveling; we're traveling, too! But we thought we'd send the show out early, just in case you have time to throw it on your iPod before you go over the river and through the woods.

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Shots - Health News
7:32 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Scientists Get A New Look At Einstein's Brain

Pathologist Thomas Harvey took dozens of photos of Einstein's brain. This one shows that Einstein's prefrontal cortex (associated with higher cognition and memory) is unusually convoluted. On the right side of the brain there are four large ridges, where most people have only three.
Brain(2012)/National Museum of Health and Medicine

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 2:00 pm

Albert Einstein was a smart guy. Everybody knows that. But was there something about the structure of his brain that made it special?

Scientists have been trying to answer that question ever since his death. Previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken soon after he died were analyzed last week in the journal Brain. The images and the paper provide a more complete anatomical picture and may help shed light on his genius.

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Around the Nation
7:01 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Postcard Takes 69 Years To Reach Its Destination

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 1:35 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. The postcard begins: Dear Pauline and Theresa, we arrived safe. But the news was out of date. Sent from Rockford, Illinois, the card took 69 years to reach Elmira, New York. Pauline and Theresa's parents went to visit brother George at a military camp. They're all dead now, but another family with two girls lives at the Elmira address, and the card has become a seventh grade history project. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Science
4:35 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Can Shellfish Adapt to More Acidic Water?

Originally published on Fri November 23, 2012 1:53 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The shellfish industry on the West Coast has had a bumpy few years and increasingly, it is pointing to climate change as the cause. Scientists believe the oceans are becoming more acidic as they absorb the increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the air, and they are not sure if oysters and other shellfish will be able to adapt to this change. Lauren Sommer, from member station KQED, has this report.

LAUREN SOMMER, BYLINE: Terry Sawyer does a brisk business in oysters.

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Sports
4:35 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Abdul Jabbar Honored With Statue

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 10:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Standing at seven feet, two inches, basketball great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar already towered over most of the competition during his record-setting NBA career. His signature shot, the skyhook, released as he jumped into the air, made him almost untouchable.

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