National

Dead Stop
3:07 am
Fri September 7, 2012

'Gatsby' Author Fitzgerald Rests In A D.C. Suburb

The grave of The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald lies next to a major thoroughfare for commuters between Rockville, Md., and Washington, D.C.
Jess Gitner NPR

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 2:55 pm

Every weekday, thousands of commuters to the nation's capital drive past the grave of a celebrated American author, and it's a good bet they don't realize it.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author of The Great Gatsby, was born in St. Paul, Minn.; he's associated with that city, as well as Paris, the Riviera and New York. But he's buried in Rockville, Md., outside Washington, D.C., next to a highway between strip malls and train tracks.

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StoryCorps
3:05 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Boy Grows Close To Grandmother, Through Memories

Graham Haggett, 11, and his mother, Shelli Wright, remembered Graham's grandmother Sandra Lee Wright, who was killed in the World Trade Center attacks. Graham brought "Lammy," a stuffed animal his grandmother gave him, to the interview.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 3:23 pm

Graham Haggett was just 10 weeks old when his grandmother Sandra Lee Wright was killed in the World Trade Center attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. But he knows a lot about her, mainly from the stories his mother, Shelli Wright, has told him.

"Somebody described her to me once," Shelli says, "as the kind of person that when she walks in the room, the temperature goes up by 10 degrees."

Sandra Lee Wright worked for Aon Corp., a risk management and insurance company with offices close to the top of the World Trade Center's south tower. She was 57 when she died.

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Education
7:01 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Students Say They've Been Denied The Right To Read

Michelle Johnson and her family talk about conditions within Detroit's Highland Park schools, in July.
Mike Glinski Mlive Detroit

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 8:08 pm

Eight Detroit-area public school students returning to classes this week are plaintiffs against a school system they say has failed them.

Their families and the American Civil Liberties Union say that the Highland Park school system has denied the students the right to learn to read, and that the state has a responsibility to fix that.

Michelle Johnson has five children in Highland Park schools. Her daughter is heading into the 12th grade, but can read at only about the fourth-grade level.

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Drew Peterson Convicted Of Killing His Third Wife

Former Bolingbrook, Ill., police Sgt. Drew Peterson, seen here May 8, 2009, was found guilty Thursday of killing his third wife.
M. Spencer Green AP

Drew Peterson, the former Illinois police officer, who became the focus of scrutiny in 2007 after the disappearance of his fourth wife, was found guilty Thursday of murdering his third wife.

The Associated Press reports that Peterson, 58, did not react as the verdict was read. Relatives of his third wife, Kathleen Savio, gasped before hugging each other as they cried quietly in the courtroom, the AP reported.

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Television
4:49 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

TV Writers Script Safe Sex 'Product Placement'

The FOX show Raising Hope follows young father Jimmy Chance (Lucas Neff) who conceived his daughter Hope (Baylie/Rylie Cruget) in a one-night stand. The show has worked with The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy to write messages about safe sex into the script.
Greg Gayne 2012 Fox Broadcasting Co.

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:09 pm

For an egregious example of a silly product placement, look no further than the CW show The Vampire Diaries, where a character actually says "I Bing'd it" of a search online. But believe it or not, product placement can actually be serious and socially conscious.

Take the Fox comedy Raising Hope. Earlier this year, the show's main character, who'd been a teen mom, caught a high school girl in bed with her boyfriend. "I'm gonna show you where this can lead to!" she screeched. "I'm your ghost of teen pregnancy future!"

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Shots - Health Blog
4:35 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

'Test And Treat' Strategy For Curbing HIV Draws Questions

Nurse Irena Majola tests Justice Mlambo's blood for HIV at a roadside AIDS testing table in a suburb near Cape Town. Under the "test and treat" strategy, about 45 million South Africans would need to be screened for HIV each year.
Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 4:40 pm

San Francisco is trying a new tactic to fight AIDS. Health workers are aggressively testing people for HIV and then immediately putting those who test positive on potent antiretroviral drugs.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:17 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

How Americans Think About Screening

Dr. Karen Lindsfor, a radiologist at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, reads a mammogram in Sacramento, Calif.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:28 am

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, Ben Franklin wrote. But that was before he had to consider the risks and benefits of screening tests for cancers of the breast and prostate.

There are conflicting guidelines on when women should get mammograms and mounting questions on when the PSA blood test for prostate cancer is worthwhile.

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Television
12:03 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Michael Strahan Bringing 'Booty' To Daytime TV?

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 9:02 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health Blog
9:54 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Detergent Packs Lead To Injuries Overseas, Too

A label warns parents to keep Tide laundry detergent packets away from small children.
Pat Sullivan AP

Scottish doctors report treating five children for injuries after swallowing liquid detergent capsules during the last year and a half.

The kids, all younger than 2, showed up in the emergency room with similar symptoms: drooling and stridor (breathing marked by a whistling sound caused by a narrowed airway). Most were treated with steroids and the placement of tubes to help the kids breath.

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The Salt
9:50 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Extreme Weather Means Extreme Food Prices Worldwide, Aid Agency Warns

Somali girls line up to receive a hot meal in Mogadishu last year after the worst drought in the Horn of Africa in decades, compounded by war, put millions in danger of starvation.
Roberto Schmmidt AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:11 pm

Reducing greenhouse gases and saving the polar bears tend to dominate discussions on climate change. But to the booming world population, one climate change issue may be even more pressing – hunger.

A new report by a leading international relief agency warns that climate change will increase the risk of large spikes in global food prices in the future, and lead to more hungry people in the world. That's because extreme weather like droughts, floods and heat waves are predicted to become much more frequent as the planet heats up.

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Around the Nation
7:44 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Alaska Zoo Holds Election For Honorary President

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 10:17 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Law
5:46 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Mass. Prison Reviews Court's Transgender Ruling

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 10:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Prison officials in Massachusetts say they are still reviewing a federal court decision in Boston ordering them to provide sex-change surgery for a prison inmate. Critics are urging officials to appeal what they call an outrageous abuse of taxpayer funds. But as NPR's Tovia Smith reports, the decision this week reflects national trends of prisons treating gender identity disorder as a legitimate medical condition deserving treatment like any other.

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Election 2012
5:35 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Bill Clinton Captivates Delegates, Nominates Obama

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 10:17 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Renee Montagne is back at NPR West. Renee, welcome back.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Thank you very much. After a nice vacation, and so glad to be here, because big news: President Obama speaks to the Democratic Convention tonight. Just as with Mitt Romney last week, the president will have a huge audience to make his case.

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Around the Nation
5:24 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Nesting Loons Help Researchers Track Toxins

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 10:17 am

Scientists have found that the aquatic birds are good indicators of toxins in the environment. That's why researchers have taken to the waters of western Maine for what's believed to be the longest-running loon monitoring study in North America.

Election 2012
5:24 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Thousands Shut Out Of Obama' Acceptance Speech

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 10:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

As we've been reporting, President Obama will not be under the stars for his convention speech tonight. The stars might not have been visible anyway. The campaign moved the event indoors, citing a chance of thunderstorms.

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